220

We are using Retrofit in our Android app, to communicate with an OAuth2 secured server. Everything works great, we use the RequestInterceptor to include the access token with each call. However there will be times, when the access token will expire, and the token needs to be refreshed. When the token expires, the next call will return with an Unauthorized HTTP code, so that's easy to monitor. We could modify each Retrofit call the following way: In the failure callback, check for the error code, if it equals Unauthorized, refresh the OAuth token, then repeat the Retrofit call. However, for this, all calls should be modified, which is not an easily maintainable, and good solution. Is there a way to do this without modifying all Retrofit calls?

14
  • 1
    This looks relevant to my other question. I will look into it again soon, but one possible approach is wrapping OkHttpClient. Something like this: github.com/pakerfeldt/signpost-retrofit Also, since I'm using RoboSpice with Retrofit, creating a base Request class may be another possible approach as well. Probably you'll have to figure out how to achieve your flow without a Context though, maybe using Otto/EventBus. Commented Mar 21, 2014 at 20:39
  • 1
    Well you could fork it, and remove the unneeded cases. I will look into this maybe today, and post here if I achieved something that might solve our problem. Commented Mar 22, 2014 at 11:12
  • 2
    Turned out, that the library didn't handle refreshing tokens, but gave me an idea. I made a small gist about some !untested code, but in theory, I think it should work: gist.github.com/ZolnaiDani/9710849 Commented Mar 22, 2014 at 17:20
  • 3
    @neworld A solution I can think of: make the changeTokenInRequest(...) synchronized, and at the first line, check when was the last time the token was refreshed. If it has been just some seconds (milliseconds) ago, do not refresh the token. You can also set this timeframe to 1 hour or so, to stop constantly requesting new tokens when there's another problem outside the token being outdated. Commented Jun 9, 2014 at 11:54
  • 2
    Retrofit 1.9.0 just added support for OkHttp 2.2, which has interceptors. This should make your job a lot easier. For more info, see: github.com/square/retrofit/blob/master/… and github.com/square/okhttp/wiki/Interceptors You have to extend OkHttp for these too, though. Commented Jan 12, 2015 at 20:13

11 Answers 11

277

Please do not use Interceptors to deal with authentication.

Currently, the best approach to handle authentication is to use the new Authenticator API, designed specifically for this purpose.

OkHttp will automatically ask the Authenticator for credentials when a response is 401 Not Authorised retrying last failed request with them.

public class TokenAuthenticator implements Authenticator {
    @Override
    public Request authenticate(Proxy proxy, Response response) throws IOException {
        // Refresh your access_token using a synchronous api request
        newAccessToken = service.refreshToken();

        // Add new header to rejected request and retry it
        return response.request().newBuilder()
                .header(AUTHORIZATION, newAccessToken)
                .build();
    }

    @Override
    public Request authenticateProxy(Proxy proxy, Response response) throws IOException {
        // Null indicates no attempt to authenticate.
        return null;
    }

Attach an Authenticator to an OkHttpClient the same way you do with Interceptors

OkHttpClient okHttpClient = new OkHttpClient();
okHttpClient.setAuthenticator(authAuthenticator);

Use this client when creating your Retrofit RestAdapter

RestAdapter restAdapter = new RestAdapter.Builder()
                .setEndpoint(ENDPOINT)
                .setClient(new OkClient(okHttpClient))
                .build();
return restAdapter.create(API.class);
35
  • 9
    Does this mean that every request will fail always 1 time or do you add the token when doing requests?
    – Jdruwe
    Commented Sep 30, 2015 at 17:53
  • 14
    @Jdruwe it looks like this code would fail 1 time, and then it will make the request. however if you add an interceptor thats only purpose is to always add an access token (regardless if its expired or not) then this will only be called when a 401 is received which will only occur when that token has expired.
    – narciero
    Commented Oct 3, 2015 at 16:59
  • 83
    TokenAuthenticator depends an a service class. The service class depends on an OkHttpClient instance. To create an OkHttpClient I need the TokenAuthenticator. How can I broke this cycle? Two different OkHttpClients? They are going to have different connection pools... Commented Mar 9, 2016 at 13:46
  • 17
    How about many parallel requests which need to refresh token? It will be many refresh token request at same time. How to avoid it? Commented Nov 2, 2016 at 9:23
  • 19
    Ok, so solution for @Ihor's problem could be synchronizing the code inside Authenticator. It solved problem in my case. in Request authenticate(...) method: - do any initalization stuff - start synchronized block ( synchronized(MyAuthenticator.class) { ... } ) - in that block retrieve current access & refresh token - check if failed request was using latest access token (resp.request().header("Authorization")) - if not just run it once again with updated access token - otherwise run refresh token flow - update/persist updated access and refresh token - finish synchronized block - rerun Commented Mar 1, 2017 at 9:16
73

If you are using Retrofit >= 1.9.0 then you could make use of OkHttp's new Interceptor, which was introduced in OkHttp 2.2.0. You would want to use an Application Interceptor, which permits you to retry and make multiple calls.

Your Interceptor could look something like this pseudocode:

public class CustomInterceptor implements Interceptor {

    @Override
    public Response intercept(Chain chain) throws IOException {
        Request request = chain.request();

        // try the request
        Response response = chain.proceed(request);

        if (response shows expired token) {
            // close previous response
            response.close()

            // get a new token (I use a synchronous Retrofit call)

            // create a new request and modify it accordingly using the new token
            Request newRequest = request.newBuilder()...build();

            // retry the request
            return chain.proceed(newRequest);
        }

        // otherwise just pass the original response on
        return response;
    }

}

After you define your Interceptor, create an OkHttpClient and add the interceptor as an Application Interceptor.

    OkHttpClient okHttpClient = new OkHttpClient();
    okHttpClient.interceptors().add(new CustomInterceptor());

And finally, use this OkHttpClient when creating your RestAdapter.

    RestService restService = new RestAdapter().Builder
            ...
            .setClient(new OkClient(okHttpClient))
            .create(RestService.class);

Warning: As Jesse Wilson (from Square) mentions here, this is a dangerous amount of power.

With that being said, I definitely think this is the best way to handle something like this now. If you have any questions please don't hesitate to ask in a comment.

6
  • 3
    How are you achieving a synchronous call in Android when Android does not allow network calls on the main thread? I am running into problems returning a Response from an asynchronous call.
    – lgdroid57
    Commented Jun 19, 2015 at 21:17
  • 1
    @lgdroid57 You are correct, thus you should already be on another thread when you started the original request that triggered the interceptor to run.
    – theblang
    Commented Jun 19, 2015 at 21:28
  • 4
    This worked great except I had to make sure to close the previous response or I would leak the previous connection ... final Request newRequest = request.newBuilder()....build(); response.body().close(); return chain.proceed(newRequest);
    – DallinDyer
    Commented Jul 8, 2015 at 18:27
  • Thanks! I was running into an issue where the Callback of the original request was receiving an error message of "closed" instead of the original response, due to the body being consumed in the Interceptor. I was able to fix this for successful responses, but I was not able to fix this for failed responses. Any suggestions?
    – lgdroid57
    Commented Jul 10, 2015 at 3:22
  • Thanks @mattblang, it looks nice. One question: is the request callback guaranteed to be called even on the retry? Commented Sep 2, 2015 at 15:20
29

TokenAuthenticator depends an a service class. The service class depends on an OkHttpClient instance. To create an OkHttpClient I need the TokenAuthenticator. How can I break this cycle? Two different OkHttpClients? They are going to have different connection pools..

If you have, say, a Retrofit TokenService that you need inside your Authenticator but you would only like to set up one OkHttpClient you can use a TokenServiceHolder as a dependency for TokenAuthenticator. You would have to maintain a reference to it at the application (singleton) level. This is easy if you are using Dagger 2, otherwise just create class field inside your Application.

In TokenAuthenticator.java

public class TokenAuthenticator implements Authenticator {

    private final TokenServiceHolder tokenServiceHolder;

    public TokenAuthenticator(TokenServiceHolder tokenServiceHolder) {
        this.tokenServiceHolder = tokenServiceHolder;
    }

    @Override
    public Request authenticate(Proxy proxy, Response response) throws IOException {

        //is there a TokenService?
        TokenService service = tokenServiceHolder.get();
        if (service == null) {
            //there is no way to answer the challenge
            //so return null according to Retrofit's convention
            return null;
        }

        // Refresh your access_token using a synchronous api request
        newAccessToken = service.refreshToken().execute();

        // Add new header to rejected request and retry it
        return response.request().newBuilder()
                .header(AUTHORIZATION, newAccessToken)
                .build();
    }

    @Override
    public Request authenticateProxy(Proxy proxy, Response response) throws IOException {
        // Null indicates no attempt to authenticate.
        return null;
    }

In TokenServiceHolder.java:

public class TokenServiceHolder {

    TokenService tokenService = null;

    @Nullable
    public TokenService get() {
        return tokenService;
    }

    public void set(TokenService tokenService) {
        this.tokenService = tokenService;
    }
}

Client setup:

//obtain instance of TokenServiceHolder from application or singleton-scoped component, then
TokenAuthenticator authenticator = new TokenAuthenticator(tokenServiceHolder);
OkHttpClient okHttpClient = new OkHttpClient();    
okHttpClient.setAuthenticator(tokenAuthenticator);

Retrofit retrofit = new Retrofit.Builder()
    .baseUrl("https://api.github.com/")
    .client(okHttpClient)
    .build();

TokenService tokenService = retrofit.create(TokenService.class);
tokenServiceHolder.set(tokenService);

If you are using Dagger 2 or a similar dependency injection framework there are some examples in the answers to this question

5
  • Where is TokenService class created? Commented Nov 8, 2017 at 16:30
  • @YogeshSuthar it's a Retrofit service - see the related question Commented Nov 8, 2017 at 18:49
  • Thanks, can you provide the implementation of refreshToken() from service.refreshToken().execute();. Not able to find it's implementation anywhere. Commented Nov 11, 2017 at 8:13
  • @Yogesh The refreshToken method is from your API. Whatever you call to refresh a token (a call with username and password maybe?). Or maybe a request where you submit a token and the response is a new token Commented Nov 11, 2017 at 8:21
  • Why not simply inject (manually) TokenService directly instead of TokenServiceHolder?
    – Abbas
    Commented Dec 14, 2021 at 20:17
15

Using TokenAuthenticator like @theblang answer is a correct way for handle refresh_token.

Here is my implement (I have using Kotlin, Dagger, RX but you may use this idea for implement to your case)
TokenAuthenticator

class TokenAuthenticator @Inject constructor(private val noneAuthAPI: PotoNoneAuthApi, private val accessTokenWrapper: AccessTokenWrapper) : Authenticator {

    override fun authenticate(route: Route, response: Response): Request? {
        val newAccessToken = noneAuthAPI.refreshToken(accessTokenWrapper.getAccessToken()!!.refreshToken).blockingGet()
        accessTokenWrapper.saveAccessToken(newAccessToken) // save new access_token for next called
        return response.request().newBuilder()
                .header("Authorization", newAccessToken.token) // just only need to override "Authorization" header, don't need to override all header since this new request is create base on old request
                .build()
    }
}

For prevent dependency cycle like @Brais Gabin comment, I create 2 interface like

interface PotoNoneAuthApi { // NONE authentication API
    @POST("/login")
    fun login(@Body request: LoginRequest): Single<AccessToken>

    @POST("refresh_token")
    @FormUrlEncoded
    fun refreshToken(@Field("refresh_token") refreshToken: String): Single<AccessToken>
}

and

interface PotoAuthApi { // Authentication API
    @GET("api/images")
    fun getImage(): Single<GetImageResponse>
}

AccessTokenWrapper class

class AccessTokenWrapper constructor(private val sharedPrefApi: SharedPrefApi) {
    private var accessToken: AccessToken? = null

    // get accessToken from cache or from SharePreference
    fun getAccessToken(): AccessToken? {
        if (accessToken == null) {
            accessToken = sharedPrefApi.getObject(SharedPrefApi.ACCESS_TOKEN, AccessToken::class.java)
        }
        return accessToken
    }

    // save accessToken to SharePreference
    fun saveAccessToken(accessToken: AccessToken) {
        this.accessToken = accessToken
        sharedPrefApi.putObject(SharedPrefApi.ACCESS_TOKEN, accessToken)
    }
}

AccessToken class

data class AccessToken(
        @Expose
        var token: String,

        @Expose
        var refreshToken: String)

My Interceptor

class AuthInterceptor @Inject constructor(private val accessTokenWrapper: AccessTokenWrapper): Interceptor {

    override fun intercept(chain: Interceptor.Chain): Response {
        val originalRequest = chain.request()
        val authorisedRequestBuilder = originalRequest.newBuilder()
                .addHeader("Authorization", accessTokenWrapper.getAccessToken()!!.token)
                .header("Accept", "application/json")
        return chain.proceed(authorisedRequestBuilder.build())
    }
}

Finally, add Interceptor and Authenticator to your OKHttpClient when create service PotoAuthApi

Demo

https://github.com/PhanVanLinh/AndroidMVPKotlin

Note

Authenticator flow
  • Example API getImage() return 401 error code
  • authenticate method inside TokenAuthenticator will fired
  • Synchronize noneAuthAPI.refreshToken(...) called
  • After noneAuthAPI.refreshToken(...) response -> new token will add to header
  • getImage() will AUTO called with new header (HttpLogging WILL NOT log this call) (intercept inside AuthInterceptor WILL NOT CALLED)
  • If getImage() still failed with error 401, authenticate method inside TokenAuthenticator will fired AGAIN and AGAIN then it will throw error about call method many time(java.net.ProtocolException: Too many follow-up requests). You can prevent it by count response. Example, if you return null in authenticate after 3 times retry, getImage() will finish and return response 401

  • If getImage() response success => we will result the result normally (like you call getImage() with no error)

Hope it help

2
  • This solution uses 2 different OkHttpClients, as evident in your ServiceGenerator class. Commented Sep 3, 2018 at 8:31
  • @SpecialSnowflake you are right. If you follow my solution, you need to create 2 OkHttp because I created 2 service (oauth and none auth). I think it will not cause any problem. Let me know your idea
    – Linh
    Commented Sep 3, 2018 at 9:11
4

As Brais Gabin said in the comment I had the problem that TokenAuthenticator depends on a service class. The service class depends on an OkHttpClient instance and to create an OkHttpClient I need the TokenAuthenticator.

So how I broke this cycle?

I created a new okHttpClient object, a new Retrofit object and with that object I did the call to get the new token using the refreshToken ( check getUpdatedToken() function)

class TokenAuthenticator : Authenticator {

    override fun authenticate(route: Route?, response: Response): Request? {
        return runBlocking {

            // 1. Refresh your access_token using a synchronous api request
           val response = getUpdatedToken(refreshToken)

           //2. In my case here I store the new token and refreshToken into SharedPreferences

           response.request.newBuilder()
                        .header("Authorization", "Bearer   ${tokenResponse.data?.accessToken}")
                        .build()

           // 3. If there's any kind of error I return null
           
        }
    }

    private suspend fun getUpdatedToken( refreshToken: String): TokenResponse {
        val okHttpClient = OkHttpClient().newBuilder()
            .addInterceptor(errorResponseInterceptor)
            .build()

        val retrofit = Retrofit.Builder()
            .baseUrl(BuildConfig.BASE_URL)
            .client(okHttpClient)
            .addConverterFactory(MoshiConverterFactory.create())
            .build()


        val service = retrofit.create(RefreshTokenApi::class.java)
        return service.refreshToken(refreshToken)

    }

}

RefreshTokenApi

interface RefreshTokenApi {

    @FormUrlEncoded
    @POST("refreshToken")
    suspend fun refreshToken(
        @Field("refresh_token") refreshToeken: String
    ): TokenResponse
}

In this project I'm using Koin and I configured this way:

object RetrofigConfig {
    fun provideRetrofit(okHttpClient: OkHttpClient): Retrofit {
        return Retrofit.Builder()
            .baseUrl(BuildConfig.BASE_URL)
            .client(okHttpClient)
            .addConverterFactory(MoshiConverterFactory.create())
            .build()
    }

    fun provideOkHttpClient(
        tokenAuthenticator: TokenAuthenticator
    ): OkHttpClient {

        return OkHttpClient().newBuilder()
            .authenticator(tokenAuthenticator)
            .build()
    }

    fun provideServiceApi(retrofit: Retrofit): ServiceApi {
        return retrofit.create(ServiceApi::class.java)
    }
}

The important line there is OkHttpClient().newBuilder().authenticator(tokenAuthenticator)

Because this is the first time I'm implementing this I don't know if this is the best way but is the way it is working in my project.

3
  • is it safe to use runBlocking or is there just for simplicity?
    – gts13
    Commented Oct 11, 2021 at 16:57
  • and I suppose you return null in the end of the authenticate function, right?
    – gts13
    Commented Oct 11, 2021 at 19:05
  • Regarding runBlocking. No need to use it here. Use Call<TokenResponse>.execute() instead. Coroutines are nice but no need to use it for entirely synchronous tasks since it introduces unnecessary dependencies. Commented May 6, 2022 at 12:42
3

I know this an old thread, but just in case someone stumbled in it.

TokenAuthenticator depends an a service class. The service class depends on an OkHttpClient instance. To create an OkHttpClient I need the TokenAuthenticator. How can I break this cycle? Two different OkHttpClients? They are going to have different connection pools..

I was facing the same problem, but I wanted to create only one OkHttpClient becuase I don't think that I need another one for just the TokenAuthenticator itself, I was using Dagger2, so I ended up providing the service class as Lazy injected in the TokenAuthenticator, you can read more about Lazy injection in dagger 2 here, but it's like basically saying to Dagger to NOT go and create the service needed by the TokenAuthenticator right away.

You can refer to this SO thread for sample code: How to resolve a circular dependency while still using Dagger2?

1

Using one Interceptor (inject the token) and one Authenticator (refresh operations) do the job but:

I had a double call problem too: the first call always returned a 401: the token wasn't inject at the first call (interceptor) and the authenticator was called: two requests were made.

The fix was just to reaffect the request to the build in the Interceptor:

BEFORE:

private Interceptor getInterceptor() {
    return (chain) -> {
        Request request = chain.request();
        //...
        request.newBuilder()
                .header(AUTHORIZATION, token))
                .build();
        return chain.proceed(request);
    };
}

AFTER:

private Interceptor getInterceptor() {
    return (chain) -> {
        Request request = chain.request();
        //...
        request = request.newBuilder()
                .header(AUTHORIZATION, token))
                .build();
        return chain.proceed(request);
    };
}

IN ONE BLOCK:

private Interceptor getInterceptor() {
    return (chain) -> {
        Request request = chain.request().newBuilder()
                .header(AUTHORIZATION, token))
                .build();
        return chain.proceed(request);
    };
}

Hope it helps.

Edit: I didn't find a way to avoid the first call to always returning 401 using only the authenticator and no interceptor

0

You can try creating a base class for all your loaders in which you would be able to catch a particular exception and then act as you need. Make all your different loaders extend from the base class in order to spread the behaviour.

9
  • Retrofit does not work that way. It uses java annotations, and interfaces to describe an API call Commented Mar 17, 2014 at 10:18
  • I know how retrofit works, but you're still "wrapping" your API calls inside an AsynTask aren't you?
    – k3v1n4ud3
    Commented Mar 17, 2014 at 10:26
  • No, I use the calls with a Callback, so they run asynchronously. Commented Mar 17, 2014 at 10:32
  • Then you can probably create a base callback class and make all your callbacks extend it.
    – k3v1n4ud3
    Commented Mar 17, 2014 at 11:25
  • 2
    Any solution to this? Is exactly my case here. =/ Commented Sep 18, 2014 at 2:35
0

After Long research, I customized Apache client to handle Refreshing AccessToken For Retrofit In which you send access token as parameter.

Initiate your Adapter with cookie Persistent Client

restAdapter = new RestAdapter.Builder()
                .setEndpoint(SERVER_END_POINT)
                .setClient(new CookiePersistingClient())
                .setLogLevel(RestAdapter.LogLevel.FULL).build();

Cookie Persistent client which maintains cookies for all requests and checks with each request response, if it is unauthorized access ERROR_CODE = 401, refresh access token and recall the request, else just processes request.

private static class CookiePersistingClient extends ApacheClient {

    private static final int HTTPS_PORT = 443;
    private static final int SOCKET_TIMEOUT = 300000;
    private static final int CONNECTION_TIMEOUT = 300000;

    public CookiePersistingClient() {
        super(createDefaultClient());
    }

    private static HttpClient createDefaultClient() {
        // Registering https clients.
        SSLSocketFactory sf = null;
        try {
            KeyStore trustStore = KeyStore.getInstance(KeyStore
                    .getDefaultType());
            trustStore.load(null, null);

            sf = new MySSLSocketFactory(trustStore);
            sf.setHostnameVerifier(SSLSocketFactory.ALLOW_ALL_HOSTNAME_VERIFIER);
        } catch (KeyManagementException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        } catch (UnrecoverableKeyException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        } catch (KeyStoreException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        } catch (NoSuchAlgorithmException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        } catch (CertificateException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        } catch (IOException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
        HttpParams params = new BasicHttpParams();
        HttpConnectionParams.setConnectionTimeout(params,
                CONNECTION_TIMEOUT);
        HttpConnectionParams.setSoTimeout(params, SOCKET_TIMEOUT);
        SchemeRegistry registry = new SchemeRegistry();
        registry.register(new Scheme("https", sf, HTTPS_PORT));
        // More customization (https / timeouts etc) can go here...

        ClientConnectionManager cm = new ThreadSafeClientConnManager(
                params, registry);
        DefaultHttpClient client = new DefaultHttpClient(cm, params);

        // Set the default cookie store
        client.setCookieStore(COOKIE_STORE);

        return client;
    }

    @Override
    protected HttpResponse execute(final HttpClient client,
            final HttpUriRequest request) throws IOException {
        // Set the http context's cookie storage
        BasicHttpContext mHttpContext = new BasicHttpContext();
        mHttpContext.setAttribute(ClientContext.COOKIE_STORE, COOKIE_STORE);
        return client.execute(request, mHttpContext);
    }

    @Override
    public Response execute(final Request request) throws IOException {
        Response response = super.execute(request);
        if (response.getStatus() == 401) {

            // Retrofit Callback to handle AccessToken
            Callback<AccessTockenResponse> accessTokenCallback = new Callback<AccessTockenResponse>() {

                @SuppressWarnings("deprecation")
                @Override
                public void success(
                        AccessTockenResponse loginEntityResponse,
                        Response response) {
                    try {
                        String accessToken =  loginEntityResponse
                                .getAccessToken();
                        TypedOutput body = request.getBody();
                        ByteArrayOutputStream byte1 = new ByteArrayOutputStream();
                        body.writeTo(byte1);
                        String s = byte1.toString();
                        FormUrlEncodedTypedOutput output = new FormUrlEncodedTypedOutput();
                        String[] pairs = s.split("&");
                        for (String pair : pairs) {
                            int idx = pair.indexOf("=");
                            if (URLDecoder.decode(pair.substring(0, idx))
                                    .equals("access_token")) {
                                output.addField("access_token",
                                        accessToken);
                            } else {
                                output.addField(URLDecoder.decode(
                                        pair.substring(0, idx), "UTF-8"),
                                        URLDecoder.decode(
                                                pair.substring(idx + 1),
                                                "UTF-8"));
                            }
                        }
                        execute(new Request(request.getMethod(),
                                request.getUrl(), request.getHeaders(),
                                output));
                    } catch (IOException e) {
                        e.printStackTrace();
                    }

                }

                @Override
                public void failure(RetrofitError error) {
                    // Handle Error while refreshing access_token
                }
            };
            // Call Your retrofit method to refresh ACCESS_TOKEN
            refreshAccessToken(GRANT_REFRESH,CLIENT_ID, CLIENT_SECRET_KEY,accessToken, accessTokenCallback);
        }

        return response;
    }
}
3
  • Is there a reason that you are using the ApacheClient instead of the suggested solution? Not that it isn't a good solution, but it needs a lot more coding, compared to using Interceptors. Commented Apr 14, 2015 at 18:15
  • Its customized to be cookie persistent client, maintains session throughout services. Even in Request Intercceptor, you can add accesstoken in headers. But what if you want to add it as a param? Also OKHTTPClient is having limitations. ref: stackoverflow.com/questions/24594823/… Commented Apr 15, 2015 at 18:03
  • It is more generalised to be used in any case 1. Cookie Persistent Client 2. Accepts HTTP and HTTPS requests 3. Update Access Token in Params. Commented Apr 15, 2015 at 18:04
0

here is my code working for me. may be helpful for some one

   class AuthenticationInterceptorRefreshToken @Inject 
   constructor( var hIltModules: HIltModules,) : Interceptor {

   @Throws(IOException::class)
   override fun intercept(chain: Interceptor.Chain): Response {

  val originalRequest = chain.request()
  val response = chain.proceed(originalRequest)

  if (response.code == 401) {
    synchronized(this) {
        val originalRequest = chain.request()
        val authenticationRequest = originalRequest.newBuilder()
            .addHeader("refreshtoken", " $refreshToken")
            .build()
        val initialResponse = chain.proceed(authenticationRequest)

        when (initialResponse.code) {

            401 -> {
                val responseNewTokenLoginModel = runBlocking {
                    hIltModules.provideAPIService().refreshToken()
                }

                when (responseNewTokenLoginModel.statusCode) {
                    200 -> {
                        refreshToken = responseNewTokenLoginModel.refreshToken
                        access_token = responseNewTokenLoginModel.accessToken

                        val newAuthenticationRequest = originalRequest.newBuilder()
                            .header("refreshtoken",
                                " $refreshToken")
                            .build()
                        return chain.proceed(newAuthenticationRequest)
                    }
                    else -> {
                        return null!!
                    }
                }
            }
            else -> return initialResponse
        }
    }
}; return response

}

-1

To anyone who wanted to solve concurrent/parallel calls when refreshing token. Here's a workaround

class TokenAuthenticator: Authenticator {

    override fun authenticate(route: Route?, response: Response?): Request? {
        response?.let {
            if (response.code() == 401) {
                while (true) {
                    if (!isRefreshing) {
                        val requestToken = response.request().header(AuthorisationInterceptor.AUTHORISATION)
                        val currentToken = OkHttpUtil.headerBuilder(UserService.instance.token)

                        currentToken?.let {
                            if (requestToken != currentToken) {
                                return generateRequest(response, currentToken)
                            }
                        }

                        val token = refreshToken()
                        token?.let {
                            return generateRequest(response, token)
                        }
                    }
                }
            }
        }

        return null
    }

    private fun generateRequest(response: Response, token: String): Request? {
        return response.request().newBuilder()
                .header(AuthorisationInterceptor.USER_AGENT, OkHttpUtil.UA)
                .header(AuthorisationInterceptor.AUTHORISATION, token)
                .build()
    }

    private fun refreshToken(): String? {
        synchronized(TokenAuthenticator::class.java) {
            UserService.instance.token?.let {
                isRefreshing = true

                val call = ApiHelper.refreshToken()
                val token = call.execute().body()
                UserService.instance.setToken(token, false)

                isRefreshing = false

                return OkHttpUtil.headerBuilder(token)
            }
        }

        return null
    }

    companion object {
        var isRefreshing = false
    }
}

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.