3

I have been using Longest Common Subsequence (LCS) to find the similarly between sequences. The following dynamic programming code computes the answer.

def lcs(a, b):
    lengths = [[0 for j in range(len(b)+1)] for i in range(len(a)+1)]
    # row 0 and column 0 are initialized to 0 already
    for i, x in enumerate(a):
        for j, y in enumerate(b):
            if x == y:
                lengths[i+1][j+1] = lengths[i][j] + 1
            else:
                lengths[i+1][j+1] = \
                    max(lengths[i+1][j], lengths[i][j+1])
    # read the substring out from the matrix
    result = ""
    x, y = len(a), len(b)
    while x != 0 and y != 0:
        if lengths[x][y] == lengths[x-1][y]:
            x -= 1
        elif lengths[x][y] == lengths[x][y-1]:
            y -= 1
        else:
            assert a[x-1] == b[y-1]
            result = a[x-1] + result
            x -= 1
            y -= 1
    return result

However I have realised what I really want to solve is a little different. Given a fixed k I need to make sure that the common subsequence only involves substrings of length exactly k. For example, set k = 2 and let the two strings be

A = "abcbabab"
B = "baababcc"

The subsequence that I need would be "ba"+"ab" = baab.

Is it possible to modify the dynamic programming solution to solve this problem?

The original longest common subsequence problem would just be the k=1 case.

A method that doesn't work.

If we perform the LCS algorithm above, we can get the alignment from the dynamic programming table and check whether those symbols appear in non-overlapping substrings of length k in both input sequences, and delete them if not. The problem is that this doesn't give an optimal solution.

  • What is the scale of k? My gut tells me the solution would be exponential in k, but I have no proof what so ever for this claim. – amit Mar 17 '14 at 9:54
  • @amit k can be up to n. I feel there should be an O(n^2) solution based on dynamic programming but I can't work it out yet. – felix Mar 17 '14 at 9:56
  • And for aaa, aaa with k=2 longest subsequence should be aa, right? (If no, what is the longest sequence in aaa_bc_bc, bc:bc:aaa?) – amit Mar 17 '14 at 10:08
  • @amit aaa, aaa with k=2 longest subsequence is aa as you say. Yes. – felix Mar 17 '14 at 10:09
2

The correction is basically when the two strings in the relevant index have a matching substring (instead of a matching letter, as it is now).

The idea is instead of simply checking for a substring of size 1 in the original solution, check for a substring of length k, and add 1 to the solution (and 'jump' by k in the string).

The formula for the recursive approach that should be translated to the DP solution is:

f(i,0) = 0
f(0,j) = 0
f(i,j) = max{
          f(i-k,j-k) + aux(s1,s2,i,j,k)
          f(i-1,j)
          f(i,j-1)
             }

where aux(s1,s2,i,j,k) is a function that is aimed to check if the two substrings are a match, and is defined as:

aux(s1,s2,i,j,k) = 1         | if s1.substring(i-k,i) equals s2.substring(j-k, j)
                   -infinity | otherwise

You can reconstruct the alignment later using an auxilary matrix that marks the choices of max{}, and go from last to first when the matrix is complete.

Example:

bcbac and cbcba. k=2

Matrix generated by f:

      c   b   c  b   a
   0  0   0   0  0   0
b  0  0   0   0  0   0
c  0  0   0   1  1   1   
b  0  0   1   1  1   1
a  0  0   1   1  1   2
c  0  0   1   1  1   2

And for reproducing the alignment you generate 'choices' matrix:

1 - chose f(i-k,j-k) + aux(s1,s2,i,j,k)
2 - chose f(i-1,j)
3 - chose f(i,j-1)
d - don't care, (all choices are fine)
x/y -means one of x or y.

c      b      c     b      a

b   2/3    2/3    2/3   2/3    2/3
c   2/3    2/3     1     2      2   
b   2/3     3     2/3    d     2/3
a   2/3     3     2/3   2/3     1
c   2/3     3     2/3   2/3     3

Now, reconstructing the alignment - start from the last (bottom right) cell:

  1. It's '3' - move up, don't add anything to the alignment.
  2. It's 1 - we need to add 'ba' to the alignment. (alignment='ba' currently). move k up and left.
  3. It's 1, ad 'bc' to the alignment. current alignment: 'bcba'. move k up and left.
  4. It's 2/3 - move left OR up.

The order of visiting while reconstructing is: (0 means - not visited, number in many cells means any of these is OK).

      c   b   c  b   a
   0  4   0   0  0   0
b  4  3   0   0  0   0
c  0  0   0   0  0   0   
b  0  0   0   2  0   0
a  0  0   0   0  0   0
c  0  0   0   0  0   1
  • Can this be made O(n^2) time? Each call to aux seems to take linear time in the worst case I think and there are roughly n^2 such calls. – felix Mar 17 '14 at 10:22
  • @felix This is done on O(nmk) (n,m are the lengths of the two strings). Checking equality of the relevant substrings is O(k), so each call to aux() is O(k) (worst case). – amit Mar 17 '14 at 10:23
  • Right. Do you think it can be done in O(nm) time instead? Say k = n/1000. – felix Mar 17 '14 at 10:34
  • I suppose aux can be precomputed as a table in O(nm) time, right? – felix Mar 17 '14 at 10:46
  • How could you extract an actual alignment? Can you do the usual predecessor trick? – felix Mar 17 '14 at 10:50

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.