26

When I select from SQL Server, I want to get a date, but omit the millisecond value, and I want it to be as a date type. So if I have a value 1/1/2009 1:23:11.923, I want to omit the millisecond but retain the date type, so that it will be the value 1/1/2009 1:23:11.000 (I know you really can't omit the millisecond value with a date, just want it to be zero).

Is there a function in SQL Server to do this? Or do I have to write my own function? Again, I don't want it as a varchar type, but a datetime type.

9

If you don't want to use string conversions, here's a solution:

DECLARE @TheDate datetime, @Today datetime
SET @TheDate = GetDate()

SET @Today = DateAdd(dd, DateDiff(dd, 0, @TheDate), 0)
SELECT DateAdd(s, DateDiff(s, @Today, @TheDate), @Today)
  • This works perfectly without rounding to the seconds. Helped me. Thanks :) – Rashmi Pandit Aug 1 '14 at 1:12
  • For those who are looking for answer without milliseconds part then this is not for you, This give '000' at milliseconds, You can try @Peter Radocchia's approach. If you are okay with '000' this is perfect for you. But cleaner the better – Gaurravs Sep 20 '16 at 11:03
53

Use DATETIME2, a new datatype in SQL Server 2008 that supports fractional precision:

SELECT
  CONVERT(DATETIME2(0),SYSDATETIME()) [yyyy-mm-dd hh:mm:ss]
, CONVERT(DATETIME2(1),SYSDATETIME()) [yyyy-mm-dd hh:mm:ss.f]
, CONVERT(DATETIME2(2),SYSDATETIME()) [yyyy-mm-dd hh:mm:ss.ff]
, CONVERT(DATETIME2(3),SYSDATETIME()) [yyyy-mm-dd hh:mm:ss.fff]
, CONVERT(DATETIME2(4),SYSDATETIME()) [yyyy-mm-dd hh:mm:ss.ffff]
, CONVERT(DATETIME2(5),SYSDATETIME()) [yyyy-mm-dd hh:mm:ss.fffff]
, CONVERT(DATETIME2(6),SYSDATETIME()) [yyyy-mm-dd hh:mm:ss.ffffff]
, CONVERT(DATETIME2(7),SYSDATETIME()) [yyyy-mm-dd hh:mm:ss.fffffff]

The conversion will round to the nearest unit, eg:

2014-09-04 09:35:47.0162993 as DATETIME2(4) -> 
2014-09-04 09:35:47.0163

Alternatively, on SQL 2005 and eariler:

SELECT
  original  = GETDATE()
, [floor]   = DATEADD(ms,-DATEPART(ms,GETDATE()),GETDATE())
, [ceiling] = DATEADD(ms,1000-DATEPART(ms,GETDATE()),GETDATE())
, [rounded] = DATEADD(ms,CASE WHEN DATEPART(ms,GETDATE()) < 500 THEN 0 ELSE 1000 END-DATEPART(ms,GETDATE()),GETDATE())

This is a bit faster than converting to and from a string representation.

  • 1
    Wow, that's great, but unfortunately, SQL Server 2005 :-( – Brian Mains Feb 11 '10 at 21:45
  • 1
    Brian, I removed the SQL Server 2008 tag. If you need a solution that only works on 2005, you shouldn't tag with a version that is not correct. – Aaron Bertrand Feb 11 '10 at 23:28
  • 1
    @PeterRadocchia I have not checked the SQL 2005 statements, but the ones that use DATETIME2 round the milliseconds to the nearest second. – Rashmi Pandit Aug 1 '14 at 1:13
  • 1
    @PeterRadocchia you should mention it. People may use your solution depending on whether they need rounding or plain truncation – Rashmi Pandit Sep 4 '14 at 2:21
  • 1
    @PeterRadocchia Great, thanks! This should be helpful for those seeking answers :) – Rashmi Pandit Sep 4 '14 at 23:53
11

Use:

SELECT CONVERT(DATETIME, CONVERT(VARCHAR(19), GETDATE(), 120))

This:

CONVERT(VARCHAR(19), GETDATE(), 120)

...omits the milliseconds, returning a VARCHAR. So you CAST/CONVERT that into a DATETIME in order to work with the desired data type.

See this link for a list of various date/time formats you can work with.

  • Converting number to string, and then back again is highly inefficient. Use the datetime functions provided within SQL – TFD Feb 11 '10 at 23:39
6

try this

 declare @DATE datetime
 select @DATE = '1/1/2009 1:23:11.923'



 SELECT convert(datetime,CONVERT(char(35),@DATE,120))

or with date functions only

DECLARE @DATE DATETIME
SELECT @DATE = '1/1/2009 1:23:11.923'

SELECT DATEADD(SECOND, DATEDIFF(SECOND, 39000, @DATE), 39000)
  • Converting number to string, and then back again is highly inefficient. Use the datetime functions provided within SQL – TFD Feb 11 '10 at 23:40
  • you will get an overflow with with milliseconds – SQLMenace Feb 11 '10 at 23:48
  • 1
    All you have to do is subtract the milliseconds w/ DATEADD(). No adding from 0 required. – Peter Radocchia Feb 12 '10 at 0:14
4
SELECT  GETDATE(),
        CONVERT(DATETIME, CONVERT(VARCHAR(MAX), GETDATE(), 120), 120)
  • Isn't the , 120 on the outermost CONVERT redundant? – OMG Ponies Feb 11 '10 at 18:32
  • the CONVERT format style (120) is ignored when converting from string to datetime. BOL says: the style of the date format used to convert datetime or smalldatetime data to character data (nchar, nvarchar, char, varchar, nchar, or nvarchar data types); or the string format used to convert float, real, money, or smallmoney data to character data (nchar, nvarchar, char, varchar, nchar, or nvarchar data types). When style is NULL, the result returned is also NULL. – KM. Feb 11 '10 at 18:50
  • 1
    @KM: in this very case, the argument is redundant indeed since this very format leaves no chance for ambiguity. However, it's not always the case. Just run this: SELECT CONVERT(DATETIME, '01/02/2010', 101), CONVERT(DATETIME, '01/02/2010', 103). – Quassnoi Feb 11 '10 at 18:54
  • 1
    @KM: I think you have a very outdated version of Books Online (possibly 2000 or 2005 RTM)? There have been several updates since then, you should make sure your local copy is up to date. Observe the changed wording in the CAST and CONVERT topic: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms187928%28SQL.90%29.aspx - @Quassnoi is absolutely correct, in fact I was going to post the exact same example he did. – Aaron Bertrand Feb 11 '10 at 23:36
  • 1
    @Quassnoi: VARCHAR(MAX) might be a little much, no? :-) – Aaron Bertrand Feb 11 '10 at 23:37
3

Subtract millisecond from date. (Or add negative value of millisecond)

SELECT DATEADD(ms, -DATEPART(ms, GETDATE()), GETDATE()) 

From SQL Server remove milliseconds from datetime

2
DATEADD(SECOND, DATEDIFF(SECOND, 0, < your datetime column >), 0)

May need to change the 0 to something else to prevent an overflow error. Don't have a SQL Server at hand right now to verify.

While this method does not appear to be intuitive at first sight, have a look here for the rationale behind it: http://karaszi.com/the-ultimate-guide-to-the-datetime-datatypes

  • Lol. Good catch, Aaron. Changed it. – Frank Kalis Feb 12 '10 at 7:09

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