42

Here is my code, but I want a better solution, how do you think about the problem?

def get_all_substrings(string):
  length = len(string)
  alist = []
  for i in xrange(length):
    for j in xrange(i,length):
      alist.append(string[i:j + 1]) 
  return alist

print get_all_substring('abcde')
3
  • 1
    Better in what sense and what is the problem with this solution? Commented Mar 18, 2014 at 3:57
  • Maybe more faster? Or not so simple.
    – lqhcpsgbl
    Commented Mar 18, 2014 at 3:59
  • @user2357112, OP's native language is obviously not English, and it seems like OP is saying "or maybe it's not so simple to make this function faster".
    – sleblanc
    Commented Apr 10, 2019 at 12:32

9 Answers 9

48

The only improvement I could think of is, to use list comprehension like this

def get_all_substrings(input_string):
  length = len(input_string)
  return [input_string[i:j+1] for i in xrange(length) for j in xrange(i,length)]

print get_all_substrings('abcde')

The timing comparison between, yours and mine

def get_all_substrings(string):
  length = len(string)
  alist = []
  for i in xrange(length):
    for j in xrange(i,length):
      alist.append(string[i:j + 1]) 
  return alist

def get_all_substrings_1(input_string):
  length = len(input_string)
  return [input_string[i:j + 1] for i in xrange(length) for j in xrange(i,length)]

from timeit import timeit
print timeit("get_all_substrings('abcde')", "from __main__ import get_all_substrings")
# 3.33308315277
print timeit("get_all_substrings_1('abcde')", "from __main__ import get_all_substrings_1")
# 2.67816185951
4
  • If you're doing timeit, you might find range is quicker than xrange for such a small range Commented Mar 18, 2014 at 4:10
  • @gnibbler I get slightly bigger number when I use range :( Commented Mar 18, 2014 at 4:14
  • @thefourtheye, don't be sad - it's a good thing if there isn't any longer a penalty to using xrange for small ranges (apart from the Python3 thing) Commented Mar 18, 2014 at 4:16
  • I'm guessing the time complexity of this is O(n log n)?
    – Tian
    Commented Nov 16, 2020 at 5:01
18

can be done concisely with itertools.combinations

from itertools import combinations

def get_all_substrings_2(string):
    length = len(string) + 1
    return [string[x:y] for x, y in combinations(range(length), r=2)]
1
  • 2
    This is much more performant than the currently selected answer too.
    – jidicula
    Commented Feb 20, 2021 at 22:52
10

You could write it as a generator to save storing all the strings in memory at once if you don't need to

def get_all_substrings(string):
    length = len(string)
    for i in xrange(length):
        for j in xrange(i + 1, length + 1):
            yield(string[i:j]) 

for i in get_all_substrings("abcde"):
    print i

you can still make a list if you really need one

alist = list(get_all_substrings("abcde"))

The function can be reduced to return a generator expression

def get_all_substrings(s):
    length = len(s)
    return (s[i: j] for i in xrange(length) for j in xrange(i + 1, length + 1))

Or of course you can change two characters to return a list if you don't care about memory

def get_all_substrings(s):
    length = len(s)
    return [s[i: j] for i in xrange(length) for j in xrange(i + 1, length + 1)]
1
  • 2
    This saved me, I was getting a memory error, I did some searching, found your solution and it solved my issue as well. Thank you. Commented Sep 23, 2018 at 17:57
7

I've never been fond of range(len(seq)), how about using enumerate and just using the index value:

def indexes(seq, start=0):
    return (i for i,_ in enumerate(seq, start=start))

def gen_all_substrings(s):
    return (s[i:j] for i in indexes(s) for j in indexes(s[i:], i+1))

def get_all_substrings(string):
    return list(gen_all_substrings(string))

print(get_all_substrings('abcde'))
4

Python 3

s='abc'
list(s[i:j+1] for i in range (len(s)) for j in range(i,len(s)))

['a', 'ab', 'abc', 'b', 'bc', 'c']
1
  • 4
    This duplicates other answers. Have you added anything to the top 2 answers from 2-4 years ago?
    – jpp
    Commented Dec 15, 2018 at 23:56
1

Use itertools.permutations to generate all pairs of possible start and end indexes, and filter out only those where the start index is less than then end index. Then use these pairs to return slices of the original string.

from itertools import permutations

def gen_all_substrings(s):
    lt = lambda pair: pair[0] < pair[1]
    index_pairs = filter(lt, permutations(range(len(s)+1), 2))
    return (s[i:j] for i,j in index_pairs)

def get_all_substrings(s):
    return list(gen_all_substrings(s))

print(get_all_substrings('abcde'))
0

Another solution:

def get_all_substrings(string):
   length = len(string)+1
   return [string[x:y] for x in range(length) for y in range(length) if string[x:y]]

print get_all_substring('abcde')
0
0

Another solution using 2-D matrix approach

p = "abc"
a = list(p)
b = list(p)
c = list(p)
count = 0
for i in range(0,len(a)):
       dump = a[i]
            for j in range(0, len(b)):
                if i < j:
                    c.append(dump+b[j])
                    dump = dump + b[j]  
0

If you want to get the substrings sorted by the length:

s = 'abcde'
def allSubstrings(s: str) -> List[str]:
    length = len(s)
    mylist = []
    for i in range(1, length+1):
        for j in range(length-i+1):
            mylist.append(s[j:j+i])
    return mylist

print(allSubstrings(s))

['a', 'b', 'c', 'd', 'e', 'ab', 'bc', 'cd', 'de', 'abc', 'bcd', 'cde', 'abcd', 'bcde', 'abcde']
1
  • 1
    Comprehensions are significantly faster than loops.
    – MatBailie
    Commented Jan 7, 2023 at 1:28

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