226

I'm trying to use Java's ThreadPoolExecutor class to run a large number of heavy weight tasks with a fixed number of threads. Each of the tasks has many places during which it may fail due to exceptions.

I've subclassed ThreadPoolExecutor and I've overridden the afterExecute method which is supposed to provide any uncaught exceptions encountered while running a task. However, I can't seem to make it work.

For example:

public class ThreadPoolErrors extends ThreadPoolExecutor {
    public ThreadPoolErrors() {
        super(  1, // core threads
                1, // max threads
                1, // timeout
                TimeUnit.MINUTES, // timeout units
                new LinkedBlockingQueue<Runnable>() // work queue
        );
    }

    protected void afterExecute(Runnable r, Throwable t) {
        super.afterExecute(r, t);
        if(t != null) {
            System.out.println("Got an error: " + t);
        } else {
            System.out.println("Everything's fine--situation normal!");
        }
    }

    public static void main( String [] args) {
        ThreadPoolErrors threadPool = new ThreadPoolErrors();
        threadPool.submit( 
                new Runnable() {
                    public void run() {
                        throw new RuntimeException("Ouch! Got an error.");
                    }
                }
        );
        threadPool.shutdown();
    }
}

The output from this program is "Everything's fine--situation normal!" even though the only Runnable submitted to the thread pool throws an exception. Any clue to what's going on here?

Thanks!

1
  • 1
    you never queried the Future of the task, what what happened there. The entire service executor or program is not going to be crashed. The exception is catched and is wrapped under ExecutionException. And will he rethrown if you call future.get(). PS: The future.isDone() [Please read the real api name] will return true, even when the runnable finished erroneously. Because the task is done for real.
    – Jai Pandit
    Mar 2 '20 at 22:21

12 Answers 12

258

WARNING: It should be noted that this solution will block the calling thread.


If you want to process exceptions thrown by the task, then it is generally better to use Callable rather than Runnable.

Callable.call() is permitted to throw checked exceptions, and these get propagated back to the calling thread:

Callable task = ...
Future future = executor.submit(task);
try {
   future.get();
} catch (ExecutionException ex) {
   ex.getCause().printStackTrace();
}

If Callable.call() throws an exception, this will be wrapped in an ExecutionException and thrown by Future.get().

This is likely to be much preferable to subclassing ThreadPoolExecutor. It also gives you the opportunity to re-submit the task if the exception is a recoverable one.

8
  • 7
    > Callable.call() is permitted to throw checked exceptions, and these get propagated back to the calling thread: Note that the thrown exception will propagate to the calling thread only if future.get() or its overloaded version is called.
    – nhylated
    Aug 27 '14 at 10:06
  • 19
    It is perfect, but what to do if I run tasks in parallel and do not want to block execution? Mar 5 '15 at 13:59
  • 59
    Don't use this solution, as it breaks the whole purpose of using the ExecutorService. An ExecutorService is an asynchronous execution mechanism which is capable of executing tasks in the background. If you call future.get() right after execute it will block the calling thread until the task is finished. Apr 2 '16 at 21:08
  • 2
    This solution should not be so high rated. Future.get() works synchronously and will act as a blocker until the Runnable or Callable have been executed and as stated above defeats the purpose of using the Executor Service
    – Super Hans
    May 23 '19 at 17:10
  • 2
    As #nhylated pointed out, this deserves a jdk BUG. If Future.get() is not called, any uncaught exception from Callable is silently ignored. Very bad design.... just spent 1+ day to figure out a library used this and jdk silently ignored exceptions. And, this still exists in jdk12.
    – Ben Jiang
    May 28 '19 at 3:21
162

From the docs:

Note: When actions are enclosed in tasks (such as FutureTask) either explicitly or via methods such as submit, these task objects catch and maintain computational exceptions, and so they do not cause abrupt termination, and the internal exceptions are not passed to this method.

When you submit a Runnable, it'll get wrapped in a Future.

Your afterExecute should be something like this:

public final class ExtendedExecutor extends ThreadPoolExecutor {

    // ...

    protected void afterExecute(Runnable r, Throwable t) {
        super.afterExecute(r, t);
        if (t == null && r instanceof Future<?>) {
            try {
                Future<?> future = (Future<?>) r;
                if (future.isDone()) {
                    future.get();
                }
            } catch (CancellationException ce) {
                t = ce;
            } catch (ExecutionException ee) {
                t = ee.getCause();
            } catch (InterruptedException ie) {
                Thread.currentThread().interrupt();
            }
        }
        if (t != null) {
            System.out.println(t);
        }
    }
}
8
  • 8
    Thanks, I ended up using this solution. Additionally, in case anyone is interested: others have suggested not subclassing the ExecutorService, but I did anyway because I wanted to monitor tasks as they complete rather than waiting for all of them to terminate and then calling get() on all of the returned Futures.
    – Tom
    Feb 14 '10 at 4:54
  • 2
    Another approach to subclassing the executor is to subclass FutureTask and override its 'done' method
    – nos
    Feb 14 '10 at 9:44
  • 1
    Tom >> Can you please post your sample snippet code where you subclassed ExecutorService to monitor tasks as they complete...
    – jagamot
    Mar 31 '10 at 15:36
  • 1
    This answer won't work if you are using ComplableFuture.runAsync as afterExecute will contain an object that is package private and no way to access the throwable. I got around it by wrapping the call. See my answer below.
    – mjs
    Dec 14 '14 at 11:12
  • 4
    Do we have to check if the future is completed using future.isDone()? Since afterExecute is run after the Runnable is completed, I assume future.isDone() always returns true.
    – Searene
    Aug 3 '19 at 11:44
19

The explanation for this behavior is right in the javadoc for afterExecute:

Note: When actions are enclosed in tasks (such as FutureTask) either explicitly or via methods such as submit, these task objects catch and maintain computational exceptions, and so they do not cause abrupt termination, and the internal exceptions are not passed to this method.

0
16

I got around it by wrapping the supplied runnable submitted to the executor.

CompletableFuture.runAsync(() -> {
        try {
              runnable.run();
        } catch (Throwable e) {
              Log.info(Concurrency.class, "runAsync", e);
        }
}, executorService);
2
  • 3
    You can improve readability by using whenComplete() method of CompletableFuture. Jul 25 '18 at 10:07
  • @EduardWirch this works but you cannot throw back an exception from the whenComplete()
    – Akshat
    Apr 13 '20 at 18:57
6

I'm using VerboseRunnable class from jcabi-log, which swallows all exceptions and logs them. Very convenient, for example:

import com.jcabi.log.VerboseRunnable;
scheduler.scheduleWithFixedDelay(
  new VerboseRunnable(
    Runnable() {
      public void run() { 
        // the code, which may throw
      }
    },
    true // it means that all exceptions will be swallowed and logged
  ),
  1, 1, TimeUnit.MILLISECONDS
);
4

Another solution would be to use the ManagedTask and ManagedTaskListener.

You need a Callable or Runnable which implements the interface ManagedTask.

The method getManagedTaskListener returns the instance you want.

public ManagedTaskListener getManagedTaskListener() {

And you implement in ManagedTaskListener the taskDone method:

@Override
public void taskDone(Future<?> future, ManagedExecutorService executor, Object task, Throwable exception) {
    if (exception != null) {
        LOGGER.log(Level.SEVERE, exception.getMessage());
    }
}

More details about managed task lifecycle and listener.

0
2

This works

  • It is derived from SingleThreadExecutor, but you can adapt it easily
  • Java 8 lamdas code, but easy to fix

It will create a Executor with a single thread, that can get a lot of tasks; and will wait for the current one to end execution to begin with the next

In case of uncaugth error or exception the uncaughtExceptionHandler will catch it

public final class SingleThreadExecutorWithExceptions {

    public static ExecutorService newSingleThreadExecutorWithExceptions(final Thread.UncaughtExceptionHandler uncaughtExceptionHandler) {

        ThreadFactory factory = (Runnable runnable)  -> {
            final Thread newThread = new Thread(runnable, "SingleThreadExecutorWithExceptions");
            newThread.setUncaughtExceptionHandler( (final Thread caugthThread,final Throwable throwable) -> {
                uncaughtExceptionHandler.uncaughtException(caugthThread, throwable);
            });
            return newThread;
        };
        return new FinalizableDelegatedExecutorService
                (new ThreadPoolExecutor(1, 1,
                        0L, TimeUnit.MILLISECONDS,
                        new LinkedBlockingQueue(),
                        factory){


                    protected void afterExecute(Runnable runnable, Throwable throwable) {
                        super.afterExecute(runnable, throwable);
                        if (throwable == null && runnable instanceof Future) {
                            try {
                                Future future = (Future) runnable;
                                if (future.isDone()) {
                                    future.get();
                                }
                            } catch (CancellationException ce) {
                                throwable = ce;
                            } catch (ExecutionException ee) {
                                throwable = ee.getCause();
                            } catch (InterruptedException ie) {
                                Thread.currentThread().interrupt(); // ignore/reset
                            }
                        }
                        if (throwable != null) {
                            uncaughtExceptionHandler.uncaughtException(Thread.currentThread(),throwable);
                        }
                    }
                });
    }



    private static class FinalizableDelegatedExecutorService
            extends DelegatedExecutorService {
        FinalizableDelegatedExecutorService(ExecutorService executor) {
            super(executor);
        }
        protected void finalize() {
            super.shutdown();
        }
    }

    /**
     * A wrapper class that exposes only the ExecutorService methods
     * of an ExecutorService implementation.
     */
    private static class DelegatedExecutorService extends AbstractExecutorService {
        private final ExecutorService e;
        DelegatedExecutorService(ExecutorService executor) { e = executor; }
        public void execute(Runnable command) { e.execute(command); }
        public void shutdown() { e.shutdown(); }
        public List shutdownNow() { return e.shutdownNow(); }
        public boolean isShutdown() { return e.isShutdown(); }
        public boolean isTerminated() { return e.isTerminated(); }
        public boolean awaitTermination(long timeout, TimeUnit unit)
                throws InterruptedException {
            return e.awaitTermination(timeout, unit);
        }
        public Future submit(Runnable task) {
            return e.submit(task);
        }
        public  Future submit(Callable task) {
            return e.submit(task);
        }
        public  Future submit(Runnable task, T result) {
            return e.submit(task, result);
        }
        public  List> invokeAll(Collection> tasks)
                throws InterruptedException {
            return e.invokeAll(tasks);
        }
        public  List> invokeAll(Collection> tasks,
                                             long timeout, TimeUnit unit)
                throws InterruptedException {
            return e.invokeAll(tasks, timeout, unit);
        }
        public  T invokeAny(Collection> tasks)
                throws InterruptedException, ExecutionException {
            return e.invokeAny(tasks);
        }
        public  T invokeAny(Collection> tasks,
                               long timeout, TimeUnit unit)
                throws InterruptedException, ExecutionException, TimeoutException {
            return e.invokeAny(tasks, timeout, unit);
        }
    }



    private SingleThreadExecutorWithExceptions() {}
}
1
  • 1
    Using finalize is a bit unstable unfortunately, since it'll only be called "later when the garbage collector collects it" (or perhaps not in the case of a Thread, dunno)...
    – rogerdpack
    Mar 28 '18 at 15:13
1

If you want to monitor the execution of task, you could spin 1 or 2 threads (maybe more depending on the load) and use them to take tasks from an ExecutionCompletionService wrapper.

0

If your ExecutorService comes from an external source (i. e. it's not possible to subclass ThreadPoolExecutor and override afterExecute()), you can use a dynamic proxy to achieve the desired behavior:

public static ExecutorService errorAware(final ExecutorService executor) {
    return (ExecutorService) Proxy.newProxyInstance(Thread.currentThread().getContextClassLoader(),
            new Class[] {ExecutorService.class},
            (proxy, method, args) -> {
                if (method.getName().equals("submit")) {
                    final Object arg0 = args[0];
                    if (arg0 instanceof Runnable) {
                        args[0] = new Runnable() {
                            @Override
                            public void run() {
                                final Runnable task = (Runnable) arg0;
                                try {
                                    task.run();
                                    if (task instanceof Future<?>) {
                                        final Future<?> future = (Future<?>) task;

                                        if (future.isDone()) {
                                            try {
                                                future.get();
                                            } catch (final CancellationException ce) {
                                                // Your error-handling code here
                                                ce.printStackTrace();
                                            } catch (final ExecutionException ee) {
                                                // Your error-handling code here
                                                ee.getCause().printStackTrace();
                                            } catch (final InterruptedException ie) {
                                                Thread.currentThread().interrupt();
                                            }
                                        }
                                    }
                                } catch (final RuntimeException re) {
                                    // Your error-handling code here
                                    re.printStackTrace();
                                    throw re;
                                } catch (final Error e) {
                                    // Your error-handling code here
                                    e.printStackTrace();
                                    throw e;
                                }
                            }
                        };
                    } else if (arg0 instanceof Callable<?>) {
                        args[0] = new Callable<Object>() {
                            @Override
                            public Object call() throws Exception {
                                final Callable<?> task = (Callable<?>) arg0;
                                try {
                                    return task.call();
                                } catch (final Exception e) {
                                    // Your error-handling code here
                                    e.printStackTrace();
                                    throw e;
                                } catch (final Error e) {
                                    // Your error-handling code here
                                    e.printStackTrace();
                                    throw e;
                                }
                            }
                        };
                    }
                }
                return method.invoke(executor, args);
            });
}
0

This is because of AbstractExecutorService :: submit is wrapping your runnable into RunnableFuture (nothing but FutureTask) like below

AbstractExecutorService.java

public Future<?> submit(Runnable task) {
    if (task == null) throw new NullPointerException();
    RunnableFuture<Void> ftask = newTaskFor(task, null); /////////HERE////////
    execute(ftask);
    return ftask;
}

Then execute will pass it to Worker and Worker.run() will call the below.

ThreadPoolExecutor.java

final void runWorker(Worker w) {
    Thread wt = Thread.currentThread();
    Runnable task = w.firstTask;
    w.firstTask = null;
    w.unlock(); // allow interrupts
    boolean completedAbruptly = true;
    try {
        while (task != null || (task = getTask()) != null) {
            w.lock();
            // If pool is stopping, ensure thread is interrupted;
            // if not, ensure thread is not interrupted.  This
            // requires a recheck in second case to deal with
            // shutdownNow race while clearing interrupt
            if ((runStateAtLeast(ctl.get(), STOP) ||
                 (Thread.interrupted() &&
                  runStateAtLeast(ctl.get(), STOP))) &&
                !wt.isInterrupted())
                wt.interrupt();
            try {
                beforeExecute(wt, task);
                Throwable thrown = null;
                try {
                    task.run();           /////////HERE////////
                } catch (RuntimeException x) {
                    thrown = x; throw x;
                } catch (Error x) {
                    thrown = x; throw x;
                } catch (Throwable x) {
                    thrown = x; throw new Error(x);
                } finally {
                    afterExecute(task, thrown);
                }
            } finally {
                task = null;
                w.completedTasks++;
                w.unlock();
            }
        }
        completedAbruptly = false;
    } finally {
        processWorkerExit(w, completedAbruptly);
    }
}

Finally task.run(); in the above code call will call FutureTask.run(). Here is the exception handler code, because of this you are NOT getting the expected exception.

class FutureTask<V> implements RunnableFuture<V>

public void run() {
    if (state != NEW ||
        !UNSAFE.compareAndSwapObject(this, runnerOffset,
                                     null, Thread.currentThread()))
        return;
    try {
        Callable<V> c = callable;
        if (c != null && state == NEW) {
            V result;
            boolean ran;
            try {
                result = c.call();
                ran = true;
            } catch (Throwable ex) {   /////////HERE////////
                result = null;
                ran = false;
                setException(ex);
            }
            if (ran)
                set(result);
        }
    } finally {
        // runner must be non-null until state is settled to
        // prevent concurrent calls to run()
        runner = null;
        // state must be re-read after nulling runner to prevent
        // leaked interrupts
        int s = state;
        if (s >= INTERRUPTING)
            handlePossibleCancellationInterrupt(s);
    }
}
0

This is similar to mmm's solution, but a bit more understandable. Have your tasks extend an abstract class that wraps the run() method.

public abstract Task implements Runnable {

    public abstract void execute();

    public void run() {
      try {
        execute();
      } catch (Throwable t) {
        // handle it  
      }
    }
}


public MySampleTask extends Task {
    public void execute() {
        // heavy, error-prone code here
    }
}
-5

Instead of subclassing ThreadPoolExecutor, I would provide it with a ThreadFactory instance that creates new Threads and provides them with an UncaughtExceptionHandler

3
  • 3
    I tried this as well, but the uncaughtException method never seems to get called. I believe this is because a worker thread in the ThreadPoolExecutor class is catching the exceptions.
    – Tom
    Feb 11 '10 at 22:41
  • 6
    The uncaughtException method is not called because the ExecutorService's submit method is wrapping the Callable/Runnable in a Future; the exception is being captured there.
    – Emil Sit
    May 20 '11 at 18:50
  • it should work if you use execute(): void, instead of submit():Future, though. Sep 25 '20 at 10:14

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