202

What is the best way to guard against null in a for loop in Java?

This seems ugly :

if (someList != null) {
    for (Object object : someList) {
        // do whatever
    }
}

Or

if (someList == null) {
    return; // Or throw ex
}
for (Object object : someList) {
    // do whatever
}

There might not be any other way. Should they have put it in the for construct itself, if it is null then don't run the loop?

3
  • 2
    You are probably better off throwing an NPE. null is not the same as an empty collection. Feb 12, 2010 at 8:35
  • 6
    @GregMattes How February question is a duplicate of October question?
    – Val
    Sep 9, 2013 at 8:47
  • 1
    Just need to use Collections.nonNullElementsIn(...): stackoverflow.com/a/34913556/5637185 Jan 21, 2016 at 1:00

11 Answers 11

249

You should better verify where you get that list from.

An empty list is all you need, because an empty list won't fail.

If you get this list from somewhere else and don't know if it is ok or not you could create a utility method and use it like this:

for( Object o : safe( list ) ) {
   // do whatever 
 }

And of course safe would be:

public static List safe( List other ) {
    return other == null ? Collections.EMPTY_LIST : other;
}
10
  • 63
    Note that Collections.emptyList() will avoid allocating an extra object (IIRC).
    – Jon Skeet
    Feb 12, 2010 at 6:31
  • 8
    @Jon: I have always asked my self, what was the use of that emptyList java.sun.com/j2se/1.5.0/docs/api/java/util/… What's IIRC?
    – OscarRyz
    Feb 12, 2010 at 6:34
  • 14
    IIRC = "If I recall correctly". And yes, there is a singleton instance that is returned for all calls to Collections.emptyList().
    – ColinD
    Feb 12, 2010 at 6:40
  • This ... doesn't actually answer the question. Why is it accepted answer? Apr 30, 2015 at 21:34
  • 2
    @ChristopherWirt because it does answer the question :D
    – Tarik
    Dec 29, 2015 at 15:16
103

You could potentially write a helper method which returned an empty sequence if you passed in null:

public static <T> Iterable<T> emptyIfNull(Iterable<T> iterable) {
    return iterable == null ? Collections.<T>emptyList() : iterable;
}

Then use:

for (Object object : emptyIfNull(someList)) {
}

I don't think I'd actually do that though - I'd usually use your second form. In particular, the "or throw ex" is important - if it really shouldn't be null, you should definitely throw an exception. You know that something has gone wrong, but you don't know the extent of the damage. Abort early.

5
  • 3
    I would change the Iterable<T> list parameter to Iterable<T> iterable, as not every iterable is a list.
    – Lombo
    Feb 12, 2010 at 6:35
  • Be careful using this method: because of use of Collections class, the use of this method involve your list te be immutable
    – Tanorix
    Apr 26, 2017 at 16:34
  • @tanorix: In what way?
    – Jon Skeet
    Apr 26, 2017 at 16:42
  • @JonSkeet you can see that emptyList() of Collections class return an immutable list : docs.oracle.com/javase/8/docs/api/java/util/… so if the user do not want to have his list immutable it can be problematic
    – Tanorix
    Apr 27, 2017 at 9:14
  • @tanorix: But the point of this question is about iterating over the returned value. That doesn't modify it. That's why the return type of emptyIfNull is Iterable<T> - there's the unfortunate remove method on Iterator<T>, but that's the only mutable aspect of it (and if you've got an empty collection, why are you trying to remove anything from it?) It's not clear what you're objecting to here.
    – Jon Skeet
    Apr 27, 2017 at 9:28
39

It's already 2017, and you can now use Apache Commons Collections4

The usage:

for(Object obj : ListUtils.emptyIfNull(list1)){
    // Do your stuff
}

You can do the same null-safe check to other Collection classes with CollectionUtils.emptyIfNull.

4
  • 2
    Will work though creates unnecessary list object. A CollectionUtils.ifNotEmpty may be more verbose but more efficient and faster. Not that it would matter much...
    – Lawrence
    Aug 29, 2017 at 10:07
  • 2
    In 2017 I would expect List.emptyIfNull(list1)
    – Dima
    Dec 4, 2017 at 20:37
  • 5
    @Lawrence, the method doesn't create new list objects, it uses Collections.emptyList() internally, which in its turn always returns the same preallocated empty unmodifiable list.
    – Yoory N.
    Feb 27, 2018 at 6:33
  • What if you call myobject.getCompanies().getAddresses() and both return a List and both can be null?
    – powder366
    Jun 28, 2020 at 13:42
12

With Java 8 Optional:

for (Object object : Optional.ofNullable(someList).orElse(Collections.emptyList())) {
    // do whatever
}
2
  • 1
    Its more verbose than simple ternary operator like someList != null ? someList : Collections.emptyList() and also creates and immediately throws away an instance of Optional object.
    – Yoory N.
    Feb 27, 2018 at 6:44
  • 4
    how are these monster lines more elegant than a simple if(someList==null) statement. Let's write a bank application in one line... Nov 9, 2018 at 8:55
12

Use ArrayUtils.nullToEmpty from the commons-lang library for Arrays

for( Object o : ArrayUtils.nullToEmpty(list) ) {
   // do whatever 
}

This functionality exists in the commons-lang library, which is included in most Java projects.

// ArrayUtils.nullToEmpty source code 
public static Object[] nullToEmpty(final Object[] array) {
    if (isEmpty(array)) {
        return EMPTY_OBJECT_ARRAY;
    }
    return array;
}

// ArrayUtils.isEmpty source code
public static boolean isEmpty(final Object[] array) {
    return array == null || array.length == 0;
}

This is the same as the answer given by @OscarRyz, but for the sake of the DRY mantra, I believe it is worth noting. See the commons-lang project page. Here is the nullToEmpty API documentation and source

Maven entry to include commons-lang in your project if it is not already.

<dependency>
    <groupId>org.apache.commons</groupId>
    <artifactId>commons-lang3</artifactId>
    <version>3.4</version>
</dependency>

Unfortunately, commons-lang doesn't provide this functionality for List types. In this case you would have to use a helper method as previously mentioned.

public static <E> List<E> nullToEmpty(List<E> list)
{
    if(list == null || list.isEmpty())
    {
        return Collections.emptyList();
    }
    return list;
}
8

If you are getting that List from a method call that you implement, then don't return null, return an empty List.

If you can't change the implementation then you are stuck with the null check. If it should't be null, then throw an exception.

I would not go for the helper method that returns an empty list because it may be useful some times but then you would get used to call it in every loop you make possibly hiding some bugs.

4

I have modified the above answer, so you don't need to cast from Object

public static <T> List<T> safeClient( List<T> other ) {
            return other == null ? Collections.EMPTY_LIST : other;
}

and then simply call the List by

for (MyOwnObject ownObject : safeClient(someList)) {
    // do whatever
}

Explaination: MyOwnObject: If List<Integer> then MyOwnObject will be Integer in this case.

3

For anyone uninterested in writing their own static null safety method you can use: commons-lang's org.apache.commons.lang.ObjectUtils.defaultIfNull(Object, Object). For example:

    for (final String item : 
    (List<String>)ObjectUtils.defaultIfNull(items, Collections.emptyList())) { ... }

ObjectUtils.defaultIfNull JavaDoc

2
  • For me, this answer is the most elegant Nov 11, 2016 at 16:45
  • Another similar approach using Java's native Objects class isObjects.requireNonNullElse(itemsList, new ArrayList<String>()) Oct 26, 2021 at 7:36
1

Another way to effectively guard against a null in a for loop is to wrap your collection with Google Guava's Optional<T> as this, one hopes, makes the possibility of an effectively empty collection clear since the client would be expected to check if the collection is present with Optional.isPresent().

0

Use, CollectionUtils.isEmpty(Collection coll) method which is Null-safe check if the specified collection is empty.

for this import org.apache.commons.collections.CollectionUtils.

Maven dependency

<dependency>
    <groupId>org.apache.commons</groupId>
    <artifactId>commons-collections4</artifactId>
    <version>4.0</version>
</dependency>
-5
for (Object object : someList) {

   // do whatever
}  throws the null pointer exception.
0

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