8

here is my code:

def merge_lists(head1, head2):
    if head1 is None and head2 is None:
        return None
    if head1 is None:
        return head2
    if head2 is None:
        return head1
    if head1.value < head2.value:
        temp = head1
    else:
        temp = head2
    while head1 != None and head2 != None:
        if head1.value < head2.value:
            temp.next = head1
            head1 = head1.next
        else:
            temp.next = head2
            head2 = head2.next
    if head1 is None:
        temp.next = head2
    else:
        temp.next = head1
    return temp
    pass

the problem here is stucked in the infinite loop.can any one tell me what the problem is

the examples are:

 assert [] == merge_lists([],[])
 assert [1,2,3] == merge_lists([1,2,3], [])
 assert [1,2,3] == merge_lists([], [1,2,3])
 assert [1,1,2,2,3,3,4,5] == merge_lists([1,2,3], [1,2,3,4,5])
9
  • 2
    Python native list members don't have head and value attributes. Your examples can't run as-is.
    – mtrw
    Commented Mar 19, 2014 at 13:25
  • i didnot get your point can you tell me more clearly @mtrw
    – srik sri
    Commented Mar 19, 2014 at 13:28
  • @srikarthikmodukuri We don't know what 'head1' and 'head2' refer to - you have not included them in the code sample. Please do. Commented Mar 19, 2014 at 13:32
  • @srikarthikmodukuri - if head1 = [1,2,3] then accessing head1.value will give error AttributeError: 'list' object has no attribute 'value'. So with native python list this program will never work. Are you passing some different type of list to function merge_lists??
    – Anurag
    Commented Mar 19, 2014 at 13:36
  • here head1 means one sorted list and head2 means another sorted list @selllikesybok
    – srik sri
    Commented Mar 19, 2014 at 13:37

5 Answers 5

16

The problem with the current code is that it causes a side-effect of the temp node's next before it navigates to the next node from the current node. This is problematic when the current temp node is the current node.

That is, imagine this case:

temp = N
temp.next = N  # which means N.next = N
N = N.next     # but from above N = (N.next = N) -> N = N

There is a corrected version, with some other updates:

def merge_lists(head1, head2):
    if head1 is None:
        return head2
    if head2 is None:
        return head1

    # create dummy node to avoid additional checks in loop
    s = t = node() 
    while not (head1 is None or head2 is None):
        if head1.value < head2.value:
            # remember current low-node
            c = head1
            # follow ->next
            head1 = head1.next
        else:
            # remember current low-node
            c = head2
            # follow ->next
            head2 = head2.next

        # only mutate the node AFTER we have followed ->next
        t.next = c          
        # and make sure we also advance the temp
        t = t.next

    t.next = head1 or head2

    # return tail of dummy node
    return s.next
2
  • thanks for telling me i understood the concept and code well.thanks
    – srik sri
    Commented Mar 20, 2014 at 6:06
  • Can you explain the dummy node concept? I did indeed have many more lines and control flow. Commented Apr 12, 2020 at 0:04
11

Recursive algorithm for merging two sorted linked lists

def merge_lists(h1, h2):
    if h1 is None:
        return h2
    if h2 is None:
        return h1

    if (h1.value < h2.value):
        h1.next = merge_lists(h1.next, h2)
        return h1
    else:
        h2.next = merge_lists(h2.next, h1)
        return h2
1
  • 1
    Can you specify the time and space complexity of this solution?
    – Shruti Kar
    Commented May 3, 2019 at 21:10
0

Complete code:-

Definition of "Node" class for every single node of Linked List.

class Node:
    def __init__(self,data):
        self.data = data
        self.next = None

Definition of "linkedlist" Class.

class linkedlist:
    def __init__(self):
        self.head = None

Definition of "Merge" function.

The parameters "ll1" and "ll2" are the head of the two linked list.

def merge_lists(ll1, ll2):
    if ll1 is None:
        return ll2
    if ll2 is None:
        return ll1

    if (ll1.data < ll2.data):
        ll1.next = merge_lists(ll1.next, ll2)
        return ll1
    else:
        ll2.next = merge_lists(ll2.next, ll1)
        return ll2

Taking input into list.

l1 = []
try:
    l1 = list(map(int,input().strip().split()))
except EOFError:
    pass
l2 = []
try:
    l2 = list(map(int,input().strip().split()))
except EOFError:
    pass

Creating linked list namely ll1 and ll2 from the input list values.

ll1 = linkedlist()
ll1.head = Node(l1[0])
itr1 = ll1.head
for i in range(1,n1):
    temp = Node(l1[i])
    itr1.next = temp
    itr1 = itr1.next

ll2 = linkedlist()
ll2.head = Node(l2[0])
itr2 = ll2.head
for i in range(1,n2):
    temp = Node(l2[i])
    itr2.next = temp
    itr2 = itr2.next

Merging two sorted linked list using merge function by passing the head of the two linked list

itr = merge(ll1.head,ll2.head)

"merge" function returns an iterator itself whose values are printed as:

while itr != None:
    print(itr.data,end=" ")
    itr = itr.next

Custom input and output:-

Input

1

4

1 3 5 7

4

2 4 6 12

Output

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 12

2
  • 2
    Hi and thanks for your feedback. However, explaining how this can solve the OP question and why his solution didn't work is more valuable.
    – WaLinke
    Commented Jan 6, 2020 at 11:05
  • @WaLinke Thanks for pointing out, I have updated the solution of merging two linked list with explanation. Commented Jan 8, 2020 at 9:29
0

To me, it was more pythonic to convert a LinkedList to list and back. I also implemented print function to output the LinkedList, which helps for testing and debugging.

def ln_to_list(ln):
    tmp = ln
    lst = [ln.val]
    while tmp.next:
        tmp = tmp.next
        lst.append(tmp.val)
    return lst

def print_ln(ln):
    return '->'.join([str(el) for el in ln_to_list(ln)])
    
def ln_from_list(lst):
    if not lst or len(lst) == 0: 
        return None
    head = ListNode(lst[0])
    tmp = head
    for i in lst[1:]:
        tmp.next = ListNode(i)
        tmp = tmp.next
    return head
0

First of all let me make clear, it is the problem of the leet code as I mentioned so here I was just trying to answer the problem, the logic itself.

Time complexity: O(n+m) where n is len(l1) and m is len(l2) as we are traversing only once.

Space complexity: O(1), we don't create any new object and just reconnect each other.

 class ListNode:
     def __init__(self, val=0, next=None):
        self.val = val
        self.next = next
 class Solution:
     def mergeTwoLists(self, l1, l2):
        head = res = ListNode()
    
        while l1 and l2:
            if l1.val <= l2.val:
                res.next = l1
                l1 = l1.next
            else:
                res.next = l2
                l2 = l2.next
            res = res.next
        if l1: res.next = l1
        if l2: res.next = l2
        return(head.next)

#create a new linkedlist which is used to store the result

#here I have used two refereces to the same list since I should return the root of the list

#head will be used during the process and res will be returned. –

6
  • Welcome to Stack Overflow! Thanks for providing this algorithm along with its time and space complexity. Can you explain how it works? Why have a Solution class instead of just having a mergeTwoLists function? What's the difference between head and res, and why do they both refer to the same object?
    – drmuelr
    Commented Jan 5, 2021 at 4:55
  • Actually let me make clear, it is the problem of the leet code as I mentioned so here I was just trying to answer the problem, the logic itself. Commented Jan 5, 2021 at 5:15
  • #create a new linkedlist which is used to store the result #here I have used two refereces to the same list since I should return the root of the list #head will be used during the process and res will be returned. Commented Jan 5, 2021 at 5:19
  • I hope you get it. Commented Jan 5, 2021 at 5:21
  • 1
    Ok, I wil do that. Commented Jan 5, 2021 at 5:47

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