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There is probably a very simple answer to this question but I'd like to know the best practice for handling this type of scenario. Running MVC4, I have a page that performs a redirects to a Controller action that performs a lookup and dynamically renders content on another page.

The page makes a call to the following controller for the lookup:

    public ActionResult GetMembershipLevel(string userid)
    {
       var memberDetails = MemberDetails.GetMembershipDetails(userid);
       TempData["MemberDetails"] = memberDetails;
       var memberLevel = memberDetails.MemberLevel;
       switch (memberLevel)
       {
           case 0:
               return RedirectToAction("Basic");
           case 1:
               return RedirectToAction("Gold");
           case 2:
               return RedirectToAction("Platinum");
       }
       return null;
    }

After the lookup, based on the Members details the data is stored in the TempData object and Redirected to an ActionResult within the same controller to provide the model data that get sent to 1 of potentially 3 views. I did this because each view will render a different set of the Model based on Member classifications:

    public ActionResult Basic()
    {
        var details = (MembershipDetail)TempData["MemberDetails"];
        ViewBag.Member = details.IndividualName;
        return View(tuple);
    }

In this code snippet, the Model is returned to a View called Basic and all this works fine. Except in the case that a manual refresh is made within the Browser. Then all Hell breaks out with the notorious "Object Not Set To an Instance Of an Object" at the line "ViewBag.Artist = details.IndividualName;"

I know the reason it's happening is because a refresh of the same page cannot and does not repeat the entire cycle that landed the user on the page. It was a Redirect with the user's selected Id initially and a refresh simply refreshes the existing page without the Id parameter causing the TempData to be null on subsequent refreshes.

I did some research and found a couple of suggestions. 1. Add modules runAllManagedModulesForAllRequests="true" to the WebConfig. (I ruled this out as a potential fix immediately as I don't believe it is relevant to my problem.

  1. Decorate my Controller with the [HandleError] attribute. (This actually worked and alleviated the problem)

But my question, "Is this the correct and best method of handling the issue?"

I read concerning the attribute, "When you provide only the HandleError attribute to your class (or to your action method for that matter), then when an unhandled exception occurs MVC will look for a corresponding View named "Error" first in the Controller's View folder. If it can't find it there then it will proceed to look in the Shared View folder (which should have an Error.aspx file in it by default)"

So it leads me to believe that implementation of the [HandleError] attribute should require a corresponding View.

If this is correct; It seems what I've accomplished is resolution of the issue but not much more than a comparable try catch block that doesn't implement the catch.

Right or Wrong? Is this method acceptable under the circumstances?

  • Not really sure of the context in which you are using this, but I generally try to avoid using TempData for anything other than simple one time messages. It the userid is the id of the current user you can easily perform another query in the respective action (Basic, Gold, etc.) and create the necessary view model. If you could provide more details on the intent, maybe there could be a better design decision, than using TempData. – Vasil Dininski Mar 19 '14 at 16:25
  • Thanks for the response Vasil. The UserId is not that of the current user. Users are only presented with a list of site members. When they see a member they'd be interested in acquiring more information on they select that user from a list. The selected users id is then used to determine the amount of content and page layout based on their subscription level. I typically try to use TempData as a last resort but it seemed to work well for this scenario. – Mark Mar 19 '14 at 16:33
3

I believe you should design your application in a different way.

Instead of having different actions that you redirect to (what stops a user from simply typing in a url with Gold instead of Basic?) you should instead have a single page that renders the correct view based on their membership status. This essentially solves your entire problem. Plus it makes it impossible for someone to type in a membership level they don't have.

Essentially, you would do this:

public ActionResult Membership()
{
     var memberDetails = MemberDetails.GetMembershipDetails(userid);

     var memberLevel = memberDetails.MemberLevel;
     switch (memberLevel)
     {
         default:
         case 0:
             return View("Basic", memberDetails);
         case 1:
             return View("Gold", memberDetails);
         case 2:
             return View("Platinum", memberDetails);
     }
}
  • Erik, you make a valid point in that there is nothing to prohibit the user from simply typing Gold instead of Basic but each view requires a different layout. Your proposition is elegant no doubt for returning different sets of the Model based on a Members Level, but how would you propose to render the layouts differently like that? – Mark Mar 19 '14 at 16:55
  • Edit Sorry, that was a stupid question. Wasn't really paying close attention. But are you proposing that this an answer to the initial question? I will modifiy my code accordingly and report the results. Thanks. – Mark Mar 19 '14 at 17:03
  • Works like a charm. Thanks. It doesn't directly answer the initial question and I'd really like to get a response to that; but it is a more elegant solution than I'd originally purposed; so that alone deserves some points. Thanks. – Mark Mar 19 '14 at 17:18
  • @Mark - Glad I could help. It's always best to design things in such a way that the user can't do something they're not supposed to, rather than have to put in a bunch of controls to prevent it, error checks, and other factors that increase complexity. – Erik Funkenbusch Mar 19 '14 at 17:48

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