40

How do I check for end-of-file using the std::getline function? If I use eof() it won't signal eof until I attempt to read beyond end-of-file.

  • That eof isn’t recommended is true, but for a different reason. Reading past EOF is exactly what you do when you want to test for EOF, so eof works well in that regard. – Konrad Rudolph Feb 12 '10 at 12:03
55

The canonical reading loop in C++ is:

while (getline(cin, str)) {

}

if (cin.bad()) {
    // IO error
} else if (!cin.eof()) {
    // format error (not possible with getline but possible with operator>>)
} else {
    // format error (not possible with getline but possible with operator>>)
    // or end of file (can't make the difference)
}
12

Just read and then check that the read operation succeeded:

 std::getline(std::cin, str);
 if(!std::cin)
 {
     std::cout << "failure\n";
 }

Since the failure may be due to a number of causes, you can use the eof member function to see it what happened was actually EOF:

 std::getline(std::cin, str);
 if(!std::cin)
 {
     if(std::cin.eof())
         std::cout << "EOF\n";
     else
         std::cout << "other failure\n";
 }

getline returns the stream so you can write more compactly:

 if(!std::getline(std::cin, str))

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.