44

I'am new to C and would like to play with threads a bit. I would like to return some value from a thread using pthread_exit()

My code is as follows:

#include <pthread.h>
#include <stdio.h>

void *myThread()
{
   int ret = 42;
   pthread_exit(&ret);
}

int main()
{
   pthread_t tid;
   void *status;

   pthread_create(&tid, NULL, myThread, NULL);
   pthread_join(tid, &status);

   printf("%d\n",*(int*)status);   

   return 0;
}

I would expect the program output "42\n" but it outputs a random number. How can I print the returned value?

EDIT: According to first answers the problem is that I am returning pointer to local variable. What is the best practice of returning/storing variables of multiple threads? A global hash table?

Thanks in advance

  • 1
    In response to the edit: I'd tend to use an array if I needed to provided multiple threads each with a place to write their results. If you don't know in advance an upper limit on how many threads you're going to create, then I'd normally consider that a problem. But in general any structure is fine so long as whoever starts the thread can ensure there's a place for the thread to store its result; the thread is told where to store it; and whoever joins the thread can recover the result and if necessary free it. If the thread exits with the same value it was passed as parameter, that can help. – Steve Jessop Feb 12 '10 at 12:08
43

You are returning the address of a local variable, which no longer exists when the thread function exits. In any case, why call pthread_exit? why not simply return a value from the thread function?

void *myThread()
{
   return (void *) 42;
}

and then in main:

printf("%d\n",(int)status);   

If you need to return a complicated value such a structure, it's probably easiest to allocate it dynamically via malloc() and return a pointer. Of course, the code that initiated the thread will then be responsible for freeing the memory.

  • 3
    If you actually mean "why not", then the reason why not is that casting 42 to a pointer type is undefined behaviour. Of course if it does anything bad then it's one of those "it's a C implementation, Jim, but not as we know it" moments. – Steve Jessop Feb 12 '10 at 11:49
  • 1
    This works but I dont understand how. What does the cast (void*) mean? I am making a pointer from the number 42 and then casting it back to int? Does it have any drawbacks? Finally what is the pthread_exit() good for when I can use just return? – Petr Peller Feb 12 '10 at 11:52
  • 5
    pthread_exit is like exit. It allows your thread to bail out early in the same way that a program can bail out early, and it can be called from any code in the thread, whereas to return you have to make your way back up to the thread entry point. The difference, of course, is that in a thread you'll most likely leak resources all over the place if you try to exit other than back out through the entry point. – Steve Jessop Feb 12 '10 at 12:02
  • 5
    Casting 42 to void * is not UB. It's implementation-defined. And real-world implementations define it as expected. – R.. May 24 '11 at 2:17
  • 2
    The result could be a trap representation, though. I'm being cautious about traps in two ways. First, I think it's fairly reasonable just to avoid writing code that could read them, even in ways that it might be argued the standard allows because the relevant text mentions only lvalues. Second, I ignore the fact that in real life no implementation defines its types to have any, except maybe floating-point types. On the sliding scale from relying only on the standard, through common implementation practice, to false assumptions that bite, it's a pretty safe bet to be less cautious in both ways. – Steve Jessop May 30 '12 at 21:28
26

You've returned a pointer to a local variable. That's bad even if threads aren't involved.

The usual way to do this, when the thread that starts is the same thread that joins, would be to pass a pointer to an int, in a location managed by the caller, as the 4th parameter of pthread_create. This then becomes the (only) parameter to the thread's entry-point. You can (if you like) use the thread exit value to indicate success:

#include <pthread.h>
#include <stdio.h>

int something_worked(void) {
    /* thread operation might fail, so here's a silly example */
    void *p = malloc(10);
    free(p);
    return p ? 1 : 0;
}

void *myThread(void *result)
{
   if (something_worked()) {
       *((int*)result) = 42;
       pthread_exit(result);
   } else {
       pthread_exit(0);
   }
}

int main()
{
   pthread_t tid;
   void *status = 0;
   int result;

   pthread_create(&tid, NULL, myThread, &result);
   pthread_join(tid, &status);

   if (status != 0) {
       printf("%d\n",result);
   } else {
       printf("thread failed\n");
   }

   return 0;
}

If you absolutely have to use the thread exit value for a structure, then you'll have to dynamically allocate it (and make sure that whoever joins the thread frees it). That's not ideal, though.

  • 2
    I just found this out but according to pubs.opengroup.org/onlinepubs/9699919799/functions/… you dont need to use pthread_exit in your function call for the thread. "The normal mechanism by which a thread terminates is to return from the routine that was specified in the pthread_create() call that started it. The pthread_exit() function provides the capability for a thread to terminate without requiring a return from the start routine of that thread, thereby providing a function analogous to exit()." pthread_exit should be used for early termination. – Zachary Kraus Aug 27 '14 at 4:05
  • 1
    printf ("thread failed\n"); - I would instead print the error to stderr using fprintf. – Ashish Ahuja Dec 28 '15 at 5:56
  • comparing void * status to int zero will result in "warning: comparison between pointer and integer" – VeraKozya Jul 15 at 23:39
21

Here is a correct solution. In this case tdata is allocated in the main thread, and there is a space for the thread to place its result.

#include <pthread.h>
#include <stdio.h>

typedef struct thread_data {
   int a;
   int b;
   int result;

} thread_data;

void *myThread(void *arg)
{
   thread_data *tdata=(thread_data *)arg;

   int a=tdata->a;
   int b=tdata->b;
   int result=a+b;

   tdata->result=result;
   pthread_exit(NULL);
}

int main()
{
   pthread_t tid;
   thread_data tdata;

   tdata.a=10;
   tdata.b=32;

   pthread_create(&tid, NULL, myThread, (void *)&tdata);
   pthread_join(tid, NULL);

   printf("%d + %d = %d\n", tdata.a, tdata.b, tdata.result);   

   return 0;
}
  • 1
    This is the cleanest example here - I am surprised it's not more highly upvoted. In particular it shows that managing the storage at the calling level is the right thing to do - and also that the pointer can be used to pass more complex structures - both in and out. – Floris Apr 11 '17 at 13:03
  • Yeah, thanx for the example! Best answer! – Arjan Poortman Jan 13 at 19:06
4

I think you have to store the number on heap. The int ret variable was on stack and was destructed at the end of execution of function myThread.

void *myThread()
{
       int *ret = malloc(sizeof(int));
       if (ret == NULL) {
           // ...
       }
       *ret = 42;
       pthread_exit(ret);
}

Don't forget to free it when you don't need it :)

Another solution is to return the number as value of the pointer, like Neil Butterworth suggests.

  • It's stupid that pthread_exit accepts only pointer as parameter then :( – Petr Peller Feb 12 '10 at 11:42
  • 4
    It's not "stupid", it's a limitation of the C type system. In order to return a parameter of arbitrary type back though the pthreads system you either need a Python-style object system, where variables don't have types, only values do, or else you need a lot of C++ template technology. In exactly the same way, you can only return void* from the thread entry point, you can't return (e.g.) a double. – Steve Jessop Feb 12 '10 at 12:04
  • 1
    Also don't forget that to check that malloc worked :-) – Cristian Ciupitu Oct 23 '14 at 20:16
2

You are returning a reference to ret which is a variable on the stack.

2
#include<stdio.h>
#include<pthread.h>
void* myprint(void *x)
{
 int k = *((int *)x);
 printf("\n Thread created.. value of k [%d]\n",k);
 //k =11;
 pthread_exit((void *)k);

}
int main()
{
 pthread_t th1;
 int x =5;
 int *y;
 pthread_create(&th1,NULL,myprint,(void*)&x);
 pthread_join(th1,(void*)&y);
 printf("\n Exit value is [%d]\n",y);
}  
  • Returning value of a local variable from thread function. without using global variable. – Abhishek Nov 18 '14 at 8:14
1

Question : What is the best practice of returning/storing variables of multiple threads? A global hash table?

This totally depends on what you want to return and how you would use it? If you want to return only status of the thread (say whether the thread completed what it intended to do) then just use pthread_exit or use a return statement to return the value from the thread function.

But, if you want some more information which will be used for further processing then you can use global data structure. But, in that case you need to handle concurrency issues by using appropriate synchronization primitives. Or you can allocate some dynamic memory (preferrably for the structure in which you want to store the data) and send it via pthread_exit and once the thread joins, you update it in another global structure. In this way only the one main thread will update the global structure and concurrency issues are resolved. But, you need to make sure to free all the memory allocated by different threads.

0

if you're uncomfortable with returning addresses and have just a single variable eg. an integer value to return, you can even typecast it into (void *) before passing it, and then when you collect it in the main, again typecast it into (int). You have the value without throwing up ugly warnings.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.