I have written the following function to estimate the pairwise correlations of multinomial variables using so-called Cramér's V. I use the vcd package for this purpose, but to my knowledge there is no existing function that would create a symmetrical correlation matrix of V from a matrix or data.frame similar to cor.

The function is:

require(vcd)
get.V<-function(y){
  col.y<-ncol(y)
  V<-matrix(ncol=col.y,nrow=col.y)
  for(i in 1:col.y){
    for(j in 1:col.y){
      V[i,j]<-assocstats(table(y[,i],y[,j]))$cramer
    }
  }
  return(V)
}

However, for large numbers of variables it gets relatively slow.

no.var<-5
y<-matrix(ncol=no.var,sample(1:5,100*no.var,TRUE))
get.V(y)

As you increase no.var computing time may explode. Since I need to apply this to a data.frame of lengths 100 and higher, my question is, whether it is possible to 'speed up' my function by more elegant programming, maybe. Thank you.

  • Assuming the calculation is commutative, you can just do half the calculations. Beyond that you'll have to optimize assocstats, which may well be possible as it seems to do a bit more than just the raw calculation you want. – BrodieG Mar 19 '14 at 19:18
up vote 4 down vote accepted

You are best off using the vectorized version of outer like Tyler suggested. You can still get a performance boost by writing a function to calculate just the Cramer's V. The assocstats function uses summary on the table and that calculates a lot of statistics you don't want. If you reply the call to assocstats to a a user defined function along the lines of

cv <- function(x, y) {
    t <- table(x, y)
    chi <- chisq.test(t)$statistic
    cramer <- sqrt(chi / (NROW(x) * (min(dim(t)) - 1)))
    cramer
}

This new function, by calculating only Cramer's V, runs in about 40% of the time required for assocstats. You could potentially speed it up again my reducing the chisq.test to something that only calculates the chi square test statistic.

Even if you just adjust your loop index values to realize you have a symmetric matrix with 1 on the diagonals and use this cv function instead of assocstats you are looking at easily a 5 fold increase in performance.

Edit: As requested, the full code I've been using to get a 4x speed up is

cv <- function(x, y) {
  t <- table(x, y)
  chi <- suppressWarnings(chisq.test(t))$statistic
  cramer <- sqrt(chi / (NROW(x) * (min(dim(t)) - 1)))
  cramer
}

get.V3<-function(y, fill = TRUE){
  col.y<-ncol(y)
  V<-matrix(ncol=col.y,nrow=col.y)
  for(i in 1:(col.y - 1)){
    for(j in (i + 1):col.y){
      V[i,j]<-cv(y[,i],y[,j])
    }
  }
  diag(V) <- 1 
  if (fill) {
    for (i in 1:ncol(V)) {
      V[, i] <- V[i, ]
    }
  }
  V
}

It looks to be very similar to what Hadley suggests below, although his version of the function to get Cramer's V uses correct = FALSE in chisq.test. If all the tables are larger than 2x2, the setting on correct doesn't matter. For 2x2 tables, the results will vary depending on the argument. It is probably best to follow his example and set it to correct = FALSE so that everything is calculated the same regardless of the table size.

  • 3
    I think this actually is the wisest approach. +1 Then combine with sgibb's solution and boom. – Tyler Rinker Mar 19 '14 at 19:51
  • 1
    I did a little benchmark of the code posted by @tomka, the changed loop index suggested by @sgibb and then the new function for Cramer's V I posted above. With no.var = 50, the starting code took an average of 5.212 seconds. Moving to @sgibb's loop index changes cuts that in half to 2.557 seconds. Adding the "hand coded" calculation for Cramer's V cuts it down to 1.249 seconds. The loops cut the time in half and then using the simpler function did it again for a total run time about 24% of the starting code. – iacobus Mar 19 '14 at 20:40
  • Can you post your code (combination of hand coded version and @sgibb's loop) as get.V4 , please? – tomka Mar 19 '14 at 21:17
  • 1
    Tomka, the full code that I've been using is posted above. You will need to change the 3 in get.V3 to get.V4 or whatever number you want to set it as. – iacobus Mar 19 '14 at 21:52

As well as the reducing the number of tests performed, or otherwise optimising the running of the whole function, we might be able to make assocstats faster. We'll start by establishing a test case to make sure we don't accidentally make a faster function that's incorrect.

x <- vcd::Arthritis$Improved
y <- vcd::Arthritis$Treatment
correct <- vcd::assocstats(table(x, y))$cramer
correct

## [1] 0.3942

is_ok <- function(x) stopifnot(all.equal(x, correct))

We'll start by making a version of assocstats that's very close to the original.

cramer1 <- function (x, y) {
  mat <- table(x, y)

  tab <- summary(MASS::loglm(~1 + 2, mat))$tests

  phi <- sqrt(tab[2, 1] / sum(mat))
  cont <- sqrt(phi ^ 2 / (1 + phi ^ 2))

  sqrt(phi ^ 2 / min(dim(mat) - 1))
}
is_ok(cramer1(x, y))

The slowest operation here is going to be loglm, so before we try making that faster, it's worth looking for an alternative approach. A little googling finds a useful blog post. Let's also try that:

cramer2 <- function(x, y) {
  chi <- chisq.test(x, y, correct=FALSE)$statistic[[1]]

  ulength_x <- length(unique(x))
  ulength_y <- length(unique(y))

  sqrt(chi / (length(x) * (min(ulength_x, ulength_y) - 1)))
}
is_ok(cramer2(x, y))

How does the performance stack up:

library(microbenchmark)

microbenchmark(
  cramer1(x, y),
  cramer2(x, y)
)

## Unit: microseconds
##           expr    min     lq median     uq  max neval
##  cramer1(x, y) 1080.0 1149.3 1182.0 1222.1 2598   100
##  cramer2(x, y)  800.7  850.6  881.9  934.6 1866   100

cramer2() is faster. chisq.test() is likely to be the bottleneck, so lets see if we can make that function faster by doing less: chisq.test() does a lot more than compute the test-statistic, so it's likely that we can make it faster. A few minutes careful work reduces the function to:

chisq_test <- function (x, y) {
  O <- table(x, y)
  n <- sum(O)

  E <- outer(rowSums(O), colSums(O), "*")/n

  sum((abs(O - E))^2 / E)
}

We can then create a new cramer3() that uses chisq.test().

cramer3 <- function(x, y) {
  chi <- chisq_test(x, y)

  ulength_x <- length(unique(x))
  ulength_y <- length(unique(y))

  sqrt(chi / (length(x) * (min(ulength_x, ulength_y) - 1)))
}
is_ok(cramer3(x, y))
microbenchmark(
  cramer1(x, y),
  cramer2(x, y),
  cramer3(x, y)
)

## Unit: microseconds
##           expr    min     lq median     uq  max neval
##  cramer1(x, y) 1088.6 1138.9 1169.6 1221.5 2534   100
##  cramer2(x, y)  796.1  840.6  865.0  906.6 1893   100
##  cramer3(x, y)  334.6  358.7  373.5  390.4 1409   100

And now that we have our own simple version of chisq.test() we could eek out a little more speed by using the results of table() to figure out the number of unique elements in x and y:

cramer4 <- function(x, y) {
  O <- table(x, y)
  n <- length(x)
  E <- outer(rowSums(O), colSums(O), "*")/n

  chi <- sum((abs(O - E))^2 / E)
  sqrt(chi / (length(x) * (min(dim(O)) - 1)))
}
is_ok(cramer4(x, y))
microbenchmark(
  cramer1(x, y),
  cramer2(x, y),
  cramer3(x, y),
  cramer4(x, y)
)

## Unit: microseconds
##           expr    min     lq median     uq  max neval
##  cramer1(x, y) 1097.6 1145.8 1183.3 1233.3 2318   100
##  cramer2(x, y)  800.7  840.5  860.7  895.5 2079   100
##  cramer3(x, y)  334.4  353.1  365.7  384.1 1654   100
##  cramer4(x, y)  248.0  263.3  273.2  283.5 1342   100

Not bad - we've made it 4 times faster just using R code. From here, you could try to get even more speed by:

  • Using tcrossprod() instead of outer()
  • Making a faster version of table() for this special (2d) case
  • Using Rcpp to compute the test-statistic from the tabular data
  • I think there is an error somewhere. cramer4 does not give the same estimates for V as assocstats. Could not spot it yet though. – tomka Mar 20 '14 at 11:53
  • @tomka Can you provide more details? It works with that one sample input – hadley Mar 20 '14 at 12:52
  • I have found why the version 4 fails. It s because of min(dim(O)). In my data, I have dim(O) = [42, 518] and length(unique(data$DateLet)) 519 (42 is Ok however). I can't say why but it's clearly the reason. Should not be that hard to workaround. Don't know if it is linked but I use data.table lib. – pommedeterresautee Sep 1 '14 at 14:11

You could reduce the calculation time by calculate only one half of your matrix:

get.V2 <-function(y){
  cb <- combn(1:ncol(y), 2, function(i)assocstats(table(y[, i[1]], y[, i[2]]))$cramer)
  m <- matrix(0, ncol(y), ncol(y))
  m[lower.tri(m)] <- cb
  diag(m) <- 1
  ## copy the lower.tri to upper.tri, suggested by @iacobus
  for (i in 1:nrow(m)) {
    m[i, ] <- m[, i]
  }
  return(m)
}


EDIT: added @iacobus suggestion to populate the upper.tri of the matrix and added a little benchmark:

library("vcd")
library("qdapTools")
library("rbenchmark")

## suggested by @TylerRinker
get.V3 <- function(y)v_outer(y, function(i, j)assocstats(table(i, j))$cramer)

set.seed(1)
no.var<-10
y<-matrix(ncol=no.var,sample(1:5,100*no.var,TRUE))

benchmark(get.V(y), get.V2(y), get.V3(y), replications=10, order="relative")
#       test replications elapsed relative user.self sys.self user.child sys.child
#2 get.V2(y)           10   0.992    1.000     0.988    0.000          0         0
#1  get.V(y)           10   2.239    2.257     2.232    0.004          0         0
#3 get.V3(y)           10   2.495    2.515     2.484    0.004          0         0
  • 2
    I was working on an answer along these same lines and can't figure out how to copy the lower triangle into the upper either. I ended up having to use a loop that set V[i, ] <- V[, i]. It wasn't too expensive as it only has to run nrow(V) times which is going to be much less than nrow(V)^2 / 2 times required to populate the matrix. – iacobus Mar 19 '14 at 19:28
  • @iacobus: Thanks, I added your suggestion. – sgibb Mar 19 '14 at 19:36
  • Very nice elaboration & testing, thank you. – tomka Mar 19 '14 at 19:40
  • 3
    Thanks for the benchmarks. My approach saves programming time but certainly does not reduce computational time +1 PS I am testing on 1000 variables and am still waiting for the process to complete. – Tyler Rinker Mar 19 '14 at 19:40
  • 1
    m[upper.tri(m)] <- cb ? – hadley Mar 19 '14 at 20:52

This uses a vectorized version of outer:

library(qdapTools)
y <- matrix(ncol=no.var,sample(1:5,100*no.var,TRUE))

get.V2<-function(x, y){
    assocstats(table(x, y))$cramer
}
v_outer(y, get.V2)

## > v_outer(y, get.V2)
##       V1    V2    V3    V4    V5
## V1 1.000 0.224 0.158 0.195 0.217
## V2 0.224 1.000 0.175 0.163 0.240
## V3 0.158 0.175 1.000 0.208 0.145
## V4 0.195 0.163 0.208 1.000 0.189
## V5 0.217 0.240 0.145 0.189 1.000

Edit

On 1000 variables these are the system times:

Tyler: Time difference of 38.79437 mins
sgibb: Time difference of 19.54342 mins

Clearly sgibb's approach is superior.

  • Thank you. Need to update my R to 3.0.3 for testing with ´qdap` - will take a moment. – tomka Mar 19 '14 at 19:40
  • 1
    You can cut sgibb's run time in half by using a simpler version of the function to calculation Cramer's V. You should be able to get the runtime down to less than 10 minutes for 1000 variables. – iacobus Mar 19 '14 at 20:41

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