75

I want to check if a point lies within a specific polygon. The polygon is:

 polygon=   [ [-73.89632720118, 40.8515320489962],
              [-73.8964878416508, 40.8512476593594],
              [-73.8968799791431, 40.851375925454],
              [-73.8967188588015, 40.851660158514],
              [-73.89632720118, 40.8515320489962] ]

The points I want to check are:

1 = [40.8515320489962,-73.89632720118]
2 = [40.8512476593594,-73.8964878416508]
3 = [40.851375925454,-73.8968799791431]
4 = [40.851660158514,-73.8967188588015]
5 = [40.8515320489962,-73.89632720118]

How can I tell if each of these points lies within this polygon?

The algorithm below does not work. I don't know why.

pt[lat,long]

function isPointInPoly(poly, pt){
    for(var c = false, i = -1, l = poly.length, j = l - 1; ++i < l; j = i)
        ((poly[i][1] <= pt[1] && pt[1] < poly[j][1]) || (poly[j][1] <= pt[1] && pt[1] < poly[i].y))
        && (pt[0] < (poly[j][0] - poly[i][0]) * (pt[1] - poly[i][1]) / (poly[j][1] - poly[i][1]) + poly[i][0])
        && (c = !c);
    return c;
}

I don't want to use a third party solution such as google maps API or this one https://github.com/mattwilliamson/Google-Maps-Point-in-Polygon.

My attempt is here: http://jsfiddle.net/nvNNF/2/

  • 4
    Pick a point outside the polygon check and see if a line from that point to your point intersects an odd number of lines that define the perimeter of the polygon. – Hogan Mar 20 '14 at 2:03
  • You can check the code live here: I put one the point in polygone jsfiddle.net/nvNNF/2 and it returns "False" – user3378649 Mar 20 '14 at 2:22
  • 1
  • poly[i].y should be poly[i][1] at the end of line 3. Also that function checks if the point is inside the polygon not if the point belongs to the polygon. – Ben Aug 26 '14 at 16:02
  • No reason for your for loop to have so many variables, reducing readability. You can test each condition individually and then alert, and once you reach the end of your code, then you combine all your conditions and check again. – almost a beginner Mar 16 '17 at 0:52
110

There is a project on Github with code: https://github.com/substack/point-in-polygon (MIT license):

function inside(point, vs) {
    // ray-casting algorithm based on
    // https://wrf.ecse.rpi.edu/Research/Short_Notes/pnpoly.html/pnpoly.html
    
    var x = point[0], y = point[1];
    
    var inside = false;
    for (var i = 0, j = vs.length - 1; i < vs.length; j = i++) {
        var xi = vs[i][0], yi = vs[i][1];
        var xj = vs[j][0], yj = vs[j][1];
        
        var intersect = ((yi > y) != (yj > y))
            && (x < (xj - xi) * (y - yi) / (yj - yi) + xi);
        if (intersect) inside = !inside;
    }
    
    return inside;
};

Usage:

// array of coordinates of each vertex of the polygon
var polygon = [ [ 1, 1 ], [ 1, 2 ], [ 2, 2 ], [ 2, 1 ] ];
inside([ 1.5, 1.5 ], polygon); // true

The test function is here: https://github.com/substack/point-in-polygon/blob/master/index.js

Note: This code doesn't work reliably when the point is a corner of the polygon or on an edge. There is an improved version here: https://github.com/mikolalysenko/robust-point-in-polygon

| improve this answer | |
  • I think it is OK to copy and paste a code given that you have included the reference. It will give the credit to the original author. – Chathuranga Chandrasekara Aug 7 '15 at 5:44
  • 1
    @AaronDigulla thats not completly true. try this simple thing in javascript: 0,3 - 0,2 and console.log the output – Pedro Silva Dec 7 '16 at 0:33
  • 2
    @PedroSilva Let me put it this way: It either works in C/C++, Java and JavaScript or it works for none of the three. They all use the exact same method to represent numbers. Using a compiler doesn't give programming languages mythical features. The C/C++ and Java libraries are just a little better at rounding the result when they print it. – Aaron Digulla Dec 29 '16 at 23:15
  • 1
    thanks, was working great, but just realised that it gives mixed results for points that lie on the edges or corners of the polygon... how could it be edited to accept these as always inside? – treeseal7 Jun 29 '17 at 23:02
  • 1
    If you will pass polygon's coordinates to this function to check are they inside itself, you will get true on half of them. – Alexander Pravdin Sep 16 '17 at 4:52
15

Your polygon array looks like coordinates array in GeoJSON polygon structure (read more at https://macwright.org/2015/03/23/geojson-second-bite.html and http://geojson.org). So maybe you can use libraries which are working with geoJSON data? Look at answer and comments to OP in Is it possible to determine if a GeoJSON point is inside a GeoJSON polygon using JavasScript?

In short, my day was saved by turf (https://github.com/turfjs/turf) There is also d3 (https://github.com/d3/d3-geo#geoContains) but i had issues with it.

UPD: I noticed turf is giving inconsistent results when point is on 'edge' of polygon. I created issue and i am waiting for answer from developers.

UPD2: 'Boundary points' issue is resolved by using latest version of turf (i used 3.0.14 instead of 4.6.1). It's all right now.

| improve this answer | |
10

Here is the function I finally got working. I got it by adopting C code to javascript from here (with explanation).

function checkcheck (x, y, cornersX, cornersY) {

    var i, j=cornersX.length-1 ;
    var odd = false;

    var pX = cornersX;
    var pY = cornersY;

    for (i=0; i<cornersX.length; i++) {
        if ((pY[i]< y && pY[j]>=y ||  pY[j]< y && pY[i]>=y)
            && (pX[i]<=x || pX[j]<=x)) {
              odd ^= (pX[i] + (y-pY[i])*(pX[j]-pX[i])/(pY[j]-pY[i])) < x; 
        }

        j=i; 
    }

return odd;
}

Where cornersX = array with x or latitude vertices array, cornersY = array with y or longitude array. X, Y - latitude and longitude of tested point.

| improve this answer | |
  • Thanks! Works great. I was able to adapt this. The return values are either false, 0, or 1. I changed to var oddNodes = 0 and return oddNodes == 1 to have a final boolean. – Turbo Oct 3 '17 at 3:39
  • It's not working for me. I am always getting 1. whatever point is inside or outside. Please help me. – Krishna Nov 14 '17 at 12:28
  • this does not work; anyway, does it exist an opensource function to fill an area with a color? If it does, it would be just a matter of comparing all filled points to specified coordinates, much more reliable for complex polygons. – jumpjack Nov 11 '18 at 9:16
0

In my case i did following thing it's working fine for me

function isLatLngInZone(latLngs,lat,lng){
  // latlngs = [{"lat":22.281610498720003,"lng":70.77577162868579},{"lat":22.28065743343672,"lng":70.77624369747241},{"lat":22.280860953131217,"lng":70.77672113067706},{"lat":22.281863655593973,"lng":70.7762061465462}];
  vertices_y = new Array();
  vertices_x = new Array();
  longitude_x = lng;
  latitude_y = lat;
  latLngs = JSON.parse(latLngs);
  var r = 0;
  var i = 0;
  var j = 0;
  var c = 0;
  var point = 0;

  for(r=0; r<latLngs.length; r++){
   vertices_y.push(latLngs[r].lat);
   vertices_x.push(latLngs[r].lng);
  }
  points_polygon = vertices_x.length;
  for(i = 0, j = points_polygon; i < points_polygon; j = i++){
   point = i;
   if(point == points_polygon)
    point = 0;
   if ( ((vertices_y[point]  >  latitude_y != (vertices_y[j] > latitude_y)) && (longitude_x < (vertices_x[j] - vertices_x[point]) * (latitude_y - vertices_y[point]) / (vertices_y[j] - vertices_y[point]) + vertices_x[point]) ) )
    c = !c;
  }
return c;
}
| improve this answer | |
-1

After @AaronDigulla, whose answer is the best, with no additional library, here is a shorter version, point being destructured into [x,y]. The answer below, includes a boundingBox test, before the winding number test. The performance is 20% slower (jsperf), but works fine and probably more readable.

function matchPointAndPolygon(point,polygon) {
  const bbox = poly => poly.reduce((b,[x,y]) =>
   ({"miX":Math.min(x,b.miX),"maX":Math.max(x,b.maX),"miY":Math.min(y,b.miY),"maY":Math.max(y,b.maY)}),
   {"miX":poly[0][0],"maX":poly[0][0], "miY":poly[0][1],"maY":poly[0][1]});
  const inBBox = ([x,y], box) => !(x < box.miX || x > box.maX || y < box.miY || y > box.maY);
  const intersect = (xi,yi, xj,yj, u,v) =>
   ((yi > v) != (yj > v)) && (u < (xj - xi) * (v - yi) / (yj - yi) + xi);
  const nex = (i,t) => i===0? t.length-1 : i-1;
  const insideWN = ([x,y], vs) => !!(vs.reduce((s,p,i,t) =>
    s + intersect(p[0],p[1], t[nex(i,t)][0],t[nex(i,t)][1], x,y), 0));
  return inBBox(point, bbox(polygon)) && insideWN(point, polygon);
}
//Usage:
const ins = pointsToCheck.map(p => matchPointAndPolygon(p, polygon));

Note: it works with the "geojson" polygon format, where the last point repeats the first point.

Note2: I was using the OpenLayers API's dedicated function, but in a web worker, it is easier to insert that "light" version instead.

| improve this answer | |
  • 2
    probably more readable Yeah, I would have to disagree... – ruohola Aug 17 at 14:10
  • @ruohola I would follow you if you give your reason. I had try to decompose the process into 5 short functions, and no variable. What's wrong with that? – allez l'OM Aug 18 at 17:58

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