Currently in ES5 many of us are using the following pattern in frameworks to create classes and class variables, which is comfy:

// ES 5
FrameWork.Class({

    variable: 'string',
    variable2: true,

    init: function(){

    },

    addItem: function(){

    }

});

In ES6 you can create classes natively, but there is no option to have class variables:

// ES6
class MyClass {
    const MY_CONST = 'string'; // <-- this is not possible in ES6
    constructor(){
        this.MY_CONST;
    }
}

Sadly, the above won't work, as classes only can contain methods.

I understand that I can this.myVar = true in constructor…but I don't want to 'junk' my constructor, especially when I have 20-30+ params for a bigger class.

I was thinking of many ways to handle this issue, but haven't yet found any good ones. (For example: create a ClassConfig handler, and pass a parameter object, which is declared separately from the class. Then the handler would attach to the class. I was thinking about WeakMaps also to integrate, somehow.)

What kind of ideas would you have to handle this situation?

  • your main problem is that you'll have a repetition of this.member = member at your constructor with 20-30 parameters? – Θεόφιλος Μουρατίδης Apr 8 '14 at 0:25
  • Can't you just use public variable2 = true under class? This would define it on the prototype. – user2509223 Apr 8 '14 at 8:12
  • 11
    @Θεόφιλος Μουρατίδης: Yes, and also i want to use my constructor for initialization procedures and not for variable declarations. – wintercounter Apr 8 '14 at 12:21
  • @derylius: This is the main problem, it doesn't have such feature. Even public/private usage is not decided yet in the ES6 draft. Give it a test spin: es6fiddle.net – wintercounter Apr 8 '14 at 12:22
  • According to the latest, it has this function: wiki.ecmascript.org/doku.php?id=harmony:classes – user2509223 Apr 8 '14 at 13:13

14 Answers 14

up vote 436 down vote accepted
+50

2018 update:

There is now a stage 3 proposal - I am looking forward to make this answer obsolete in a few months.

In the meantime anyone using TypeScript or babel can use the syntax:

varName = value

Inside a class declaration/expression body and it will define a variable. Hopefully in a few months/weeks I'll be able to post an update.


The notes in the ES wiki for the proposal in ES6 (maximally minimal classes) note:

There is (intentionally) no direct declarative way to define either prototype data properties (other than methods) class properties, or instance property

Class properties and prototype data properties need be created outside the declaration.

Properties specified in a class definition are assigned the same attributes as if they appeared in an object literal.

This means that what you're asking for was considered, and explicitly decided against.

but... why?

Good question. The good people of TC39 want class declarations to declare and define the capabilities of a class. Not its members. An ES6 class declaration defines its contract for its user.

Remember, a class definition defines prototype methods - defining variables on the prototype is generally not something you do. You can, of course use:

constructor(){
    this.foo = bar
}

In the constructor like you suggested. Also see the summary of the consensus.

ES7 and beyond

A new proposal for ES7 is being worked on that allows more concise instance variables through class declarations and expressions - https://esdiscuss.org/topic/es7-property-initializers

  • 4
    @wintercounter the important thing to take from it is that allowing defining properties would define them on the prototype like the methods and not on each instance. Maximally minimal classes is still at its very core prototypical inheritance. What you really want to do in your case is share structure and assign members for each instance. This is simply not what classes in ES6 aim for - sharing functionality. So yes, for sharing structure you'd have to stick to the old syntax. Until ES7 at least :) – Benjamin Gruenbaum Apr 11 '14 at 8:26
  • 5
    You might want to mention static properties – Bergi Feb 26 '15 at 22:57
  • 7
    Oops, brain fart. I forgot that static works only for methods as well. – Bergi Feb 26 '15 at 23:07
  • 485
    Maybe the good people at TC39 should name this concept something other than "class" if they don't want it to behave like the rest of the programming world expects from something named "class". – Alex Jan 4 '16 at 17:59
  • 7
    See also the "Class Fields & Static Properties" proposal (already implemented in Babel: github.com/jeffmo/es-class-fields-and-static-properties – Matt Browne Apr 16 '16 at 0:57

Just to add to Benjamin's answer — class variables are possible, but you wouldn't use prototype to set them.

For a true class variable you'd want to do something like the following:

class MyClass {}
MyClass.foo = 'bar';

From within a class method that variable can be accessed as this.constructor.foo (or MyClass.foo).

These class properties would not usually be accessible from to the class instance. i.e. MyClass.foo gives 'bar' but new MyClass().foo is undefined

If you want to also have access to your class variable from an instance, you'll have to additionally define a getter:

class MyClass {
    get foo() {
        return this.constructor.foo;
    }
}

MyClass.foo = 'bar';

I've only tested this with Traceur, but I believe it will work the same in a standard implementation.

JavaScript doesn't really have classes. Even with ES6 we're looking at an object- or prototype-based language rather than a class-based language. In any function X () {}, X.prototype.constructor points back to X. When the new operator is used on X, a new object is created inheriting X.prototype. Any undefined properties in that new object (including constructor) are looked up from there. We can think of this as generating object and class properties.

  • 4
    Your points (2) and (3) are incorrect. There is no copying of properties happening, and no .constructor property is created by the new call. – Bergi Oct 2 '14 at 14:41
  • 1
    @Bergi you are right about (2): it is not really copying, but a lookup up the prototype chain, which opens up special possibilities. I will see how I can reformulate this. What do you think is wrong about (3) though? function X() {}; var x = new X(); x.constructor === X; is true, so for all intends and purposes my statement should be correct? – lyschoening Oct 2 '14 at 16:37
  • 3
    Try var x = new X; x.hasOwnProperty("constructor") // false. The .constructor property is simply inherited from X.prototype (where it is set by default when you create the constructor function); the new operator does have nothing to do with it. – Bergi Oct 6 '14 at 1:50
  • 1
    Updated. I didn't want to go into much more detail than what is needed to give additional context to my answer, but clearly there shouldn't be any inaccuracies and I think they're fixed now. – lyschoening Oct 6 '14 at 9:34
  • The approach of the getter cannot be highlighted enough as this is usage wise the very exact the question is about – hsc Apr 10 at 9:18

In your example:

class MyClass {
    const MY_CONST = 'string';
    constructor(){
        this.MY_CONST;
    }
}

Because of MY_CONST is primitive https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Glossary/Primitive we can just do:

class MyClass {
    static get MY_CONST() {
        return 'string';
    }
    get MY_CONST() {
        return this.constructor.MY_CONST;
    }
    constructor() {
        alert(this.MY_CONST === this.constructor.MY_CONST);
    }
}
alert(MyClass.MY_CONST);
new MyClass

// alert: string ; true

But if MY_CONST is reference type like static get MY_CONST() {return ['string'];} alert output is string, false. In such case delete operator can do the trick:

class MyClass {
    static get MY_CONST() {
        delete MyClass.MY_CONST;
        return MyClass.MY_CONST = 'string';
    }
    get MY_CONST() {
        return this.constructor.MY_CONST;
    }
    constructor() {
        alert(this.MY_CONST === this.constructor.MY_CONST);
    }
}
alert(MyClass.MY_CONST);
new MyClass

// alert: string ; true

And finally for class variable not const:

class MyClass {
    static get MY_CONST() {
        delete MyClass.MY_CONST;
        return MyClass.MY_CONST = 'string';
    }
    static set U_YIN_YANG(value) {
      delete MyClass.MY_CONST;
      MyClass.MY_CONST = value;
    }
    get MY_CONST() {
        return this.constructor.MY_CONST;
    }
    set MY_CONST(value) {
        this.constructor.MY_CONST = value;
    }
    constructor() {
        alert(this.MY_CONST === this.constructor.MY_CONST);
    }
}
alert(MyClass.MY_CONST);
new MyClass
// alert: string, true
MyClass.MY_CONST = ['string, 42']
alert(MyClass.MY_CONST);
new MyClass
// alert: string, 42 ; true
  • 4
    Please avoid the delete operator, if alone for performance reasons. What you actually want here is Object.defineProperty. – Bergi Oct 23 '15 at 4:02
  • 7
    This is a hack and it's terrible, declaring constants as return values from methods... Appalling. – shinzou Apr 10 '17 at 9:34

Babel supports class variables in ESNext, check this example:

class Foo {
  bar = 2
  static iha = 'string'
}

const foo = new Foo();
console.log(foo.bar, foo.iha, Foo.bar, Foo.iha);
// 2, undefined, undefined, 'string'
  • You can make bar a private class variable by pretending it with "#" like this: #bar = 2; – Lonnie Best 2 days ago

What about the oldschool way?

class MyClass {
     constructor(count){ 
          this.countVar = 1 + count;
     }
}
MyClass.prototype.foo = "foo";
MyClass.prototype.countVar = 0;

// ... 

var o1 = new MyClass(2); o2 = new MyClass(3);
o1.foo = "newFoo";

console.log( o1.foo,o2.foo);
console.log( o1.countVar,o2.countVar);

In constructor you mention only those vars which have to be computed. I like prototype inheritance for this feature -- it can help to save a lot of memory(in case if there are a lot of never-assigned vars).

  • 4
    This doesn't save memory and it just makes performance much worse than if you had declared them in the constructor. codereview.stackexchange.com/a/28360/9258 – Esailija Feb 13 '15 at 22:34
  • 2
    Also, this defeats the purpose of using ES6 classes in the first place. As it stands, it seems hardly possible to use ES6 classes like real oop classes, which is somewhat disappointing... – Kokodoko Dec 22 '15 at 14:45
  • 4
    @Kokodoko real oop -- you mean, like i.e. in Java? I agree, I've noticed that a lot of people angry to JS because they try to use it like Java, like they get used to, because JS syntax looks similar, and they assume that it works the same way... But from the inside, it is quite differ, as we know. – zarkone Dec 23 '15 at 6:01
  • 2
    It's not just about language syntax though. The OOP philosophy lends itself quite well to programming in general - especially when creating apps and games. JS has traditionally been implemented in building webpages which is quite different. Somehow those two approaches need to come together, since the web is becoming more about apps as well. – Kokodoko Dec 23 '15 at 9:47
  • 1
    @Kokodoko Just because it's a different OOP doesn't mean it isn't OOP. Prototypes are a 100%-valid OOP approach; nobody's going to call Self "non-OOP" because it uses prototypes. Not matching another OOP paradigm means just that: it's different. – Dave Newton May 9 '17 at 19:42

Since your issue is mostly stylistic (not wanting to fill up the constructor with a bunch of declarations) it can be solved stylistically as well.

The way I view it, many class based languages have the constructor be a function named after the class name itself. Stylistically we could use that that to make an ES6 class that stylistically still makes sense but does not group the typical actions taking place in the constructor with all the property declarations we're doing. We simply use the actual JS constructor as the "declaration area", then make a class named function that we otherwise treat as the "other constructor stuff" area, calling it at the end of the true constructor.

"use strict";

class MyClass
{
    // only declare your properties and then call this.ClassName(); from here
    constructor(){
        this.prop1 = 'blah 1';
        this.prop2 = 'blah 2';
        this.prop3 = 'blah 3';
        this.MyClass();
    }

    // all sorts of other "constructor" stuff, no longer jumbled with declarations
    MyClass() {
        doWhatever();
    }
}

Both will be called as the new instance is constructed.

Sorta like having 2 constructors where you separate out the declarations and the other constructor actions you want to take, and stylistically makes it not too hard to understand that's what is going on too.

I find it's a nice style to use when dealing with a lot of declarations and/or a lot of actions needing to happen on instantiation and wanting to keep the two ideas distinct from each other.


NOTE: I very purposefully do not use the typical idiomatic ideas of "initializing" (like an init() or initialize() method) because those are often used differently. There is a sort of presumed difference between the idea of constructing and initializing. Working with constructors people know that they're called automatically as part of instantiation. Seeing an init method many people are going to assume without a second glance that they need to be doing something along the form of var mc = MyClass(); mc.init();, because that's how you typically initialize. I'm not trying to add an initialization process for the user of the class, I'm trying to add to the construction process of the class itself.

While some people may do a double-take for a moment, that's actually the bit of the point: it communicates to them that the intent is part of construction, even if that makes them do a bit of a double take and go "that's not how ES6 constructors work" and take a second looking at the actual constructor to go "oh, they call it at the bottom, I see", that's far better than NOT communicating that intent (or incorrectly communicating it) and probably getting a lot of people using it wrong, trying to initialize it from the outside and junk. That's very much intentional to the pattern I suggest.


For those that don't want to follow that pattern, the exact opposite can work too. Farm the declarations out to another function at the beginning. Maybe name it "properties" or "publicProperties" or something. Then put the rest of the stuff in the normal constructor.

"use strict";

class MyClass
{
    properties() {
        this.prop1 = 'blah 1';
        this.prop2 = 'blah 2';
        this.prop3 = 'blah 3';
    }

    constructor() {
        this.properties();
        doWhatever();
    }
}

Note that this second method may look cleaner but it also has an inherent problem where properties gets overridden as one class using this method extends another. You'd have to give more unique names to properties to avoid that. My first method does not have this problem because its fake half of the constructor is uniquely named after the class.

  • 1
    Please don't use a prototype method named after the class itself. That's non-idiomatic in JS, don't try to make it look like another language. If you really want to use this approach, the canonical name for the method is init. – Bergi Dec 22 '15 at 12:13
  • 1
    @Bergi - init is a pattern used often, and often meant to be called from outside the class when the outside user wants to initialize, i.e. var b = new Thing(); b.init();. This is a 100% stylistic choice that I'd prefer to communicate that it is a 2nd function that is automatically called by taking advantage of the patterns found in other languages. It's far less likely that someone would look at this and assume that they need to call the MyClass method from outside, more likely that they'd realize the intent is a 2nd method acting in construction (i.e. called by itself on instantiation). – Jimbo Jonny Dec 22 '15 at 16:20
  • Hm, I might realise that by looking at the constructor, but not from the method name MyClass. – Bergi Dec 22 '15 at 19:05
  • @Bergi - you very well might not realize it at first just from looking at the method name MyClass. But you wouldn't get false assumptions from it either. At worst you might not know JS and think it's the actual constructor...but since it acts like that and the only things happening in the true constructor are declarations...that actually would not be that improper of a way of treating it. – Jimbo Jonny Dec 22 '15 at 19:52
  • @Bergi - Taking a pattern from another language and applying it to JS in a way that isn't technically what's happening, but still works is not completely without precedent. You can't tell me nobody has noticed that the $myvar standard way of referring to variables intended to hold jQuery objects isn't conveniently similar to the pattern of having $ at the beginning of variables that so many PHP programmers are used to. Just that little implication that "yeah, it's not the same exact thing...but look...it's still a variable because that is a way variables are done in some languages!" helps. – Jimbo Jonny Dec 22 '15 at 20:00

As Benjamin said in his answer, TC39 explicitly decided not to include this feature at least for ES2015. However, the consensus seems to be that they will add it in ES2016.

The syntax hasn't been decided yet, but there's a preliminary proposal for ES2016 that will allow you to declare static properties on a class.

Thanks to the magic of babel, you can use this today. Enable the class properties transform according to these instructions and you're good to go. Here's an example of the syntax:

class foo {
  static myProp = 'bar'
  someFunction() {
    console.log(this.myProp)
  }
}

This proposal is in a very early state, so be prepared to tweak your syntax as time goes on.

  • Yes, that's not ES6. Unless you know what it is, you should not use it. – Bergi Dec 17 '15 at 1:59

You can mimic es6 classes behaviour... and use your class variables :)

Look mum... no classes!

// Helper
const $constructor = Symbol();
const $extends = (parent, child) =>
  Object.assign(Object.create(parent), child);
const $new = (object, ...args) => {
  let instance = Object.create(object);
  instance[$constructor].call(instance, ...args);
  return instance;
}
const $super = (parent, context, ...args) => {
  parent[$constructor].call(context, ...args)
}
// class
var Foo = {
  classVariable: true,

  // constructor
  [$constructor](who){
    this.me = who;
    this.species = 'fufel';
  },

  // methods
  identify(){
    return 'I am ' + this.me;
  }
}

// class extends Foo
var Bar = $extends(Foo, {

  // constructor
  [$constructor](who){
    $super(Foo, this, who);
    this.subtype = 'barashek';
  },

  // methods
  speak(){
    console.log('Hello, ' + this.identify());
  },
  bark(num){
    console.log('Woof');
  }
});

var a1 = $new(Foo, 'a1');
var b1 = $new(Bar, 'b1');
console.log(a1, b1);
console.log('b1.classVariable', b1.classVariable);

I put it on GitHub

[Long thread, not sure if its already listed as an option...].
A simple alternative would be defining the const outside of class. This will be accessible only from the module itself, unless accompanied with a getter.
This way prototype isn't littered and you get the const.

// will be accessible only from the module itself
const MY_CONST = 'string'; 
class MyClass {

    // optional, if external access is desired
    static get MY_CONST(){return MY_CONST;}

    // access example
    static someMethod(){
        console.log(MY_CONST);
    }
}

This is what I always do. If the ES7 proposal goes though I wont need to change anything in my code except the class definition.

class MyClass {
    get MY_CONST() { return 'mystring'; }
}

console.log(MyClass.MY_CONST); //outputs = mystring
  • Actually, it outputs undefined (not "mystring"). – Lonnie Best 2 days ago

Can you avoid the whole issue by using strong literals and a little library of templates logic run contained in a larger closure?

ignoring the closure for now

const myDynamicInputs=(items)=>\backtick -${ items.map((item, I, array)=>'${do tons of junk}').join('')}';

http://codepen.io/jfrazz/pen/BQJPBZ/

THIS is the simplest example I can offer from repository, The first 400 lines are a data library+ some basic utility functions. Plus a handful of utility constants.

After the boiler plate, which we are turning into a data uri--downloaded by app users--we have array templates, that have to be lifted and redeployed, but which can be composed to be anything from inputs, dropdowns, or 52 pages of questions and data.

That is this second example: Eat an object, get inputs of various types, all using const as the base variable of library, being constructed.

http://codepen.io/jfrazz/pen/rWprVR/

Not exactly what you asked, but a clear showing that constant can be pretty dynamic.

The way I solved this, which is another option (if you have jQuery available), was to Define the fields in an old-school object and then extend the class with that object. I also didn't want to pepper the constructor with assignments, this appeared to be a neat solution.

function MyClassFields(){
    this.createdAt = new Date();
}

MyClassFields.prototype = {
    id : '',
    type : '',
    title : '',
    createdAt : null,
};

class MyClass {
    constructor() {
        $.extend(this,new MyClassFields());
    }
};

-- Update Following Bergi's comment.

No JQuery Version:

class SavedSearch  {
    constructor() {
        Object.assign(this,{
            id : '',
            type : '',
            title : '',
            createdAt: new Date(),
        });

    }
}

You still do end up with 'fat' constructor, but at least its all in one class and assigned in one hit.

EDIT #2: I've now gone full circle and am now assigning values in the constructor, e.g.

class SavedSearch  {
    constructor() {
        this.id = '';
        this.type = '';
        this.title = '';
        this.createdAt = new Date();
    }
}

Why? Simple really, using the above plus some JSdoc comments, PHPStorm was able to perform code completion on the properties. Assigning all the vars in one hit was nice, but the inability to code complete the properties, imo, isn't worth the (almost certainly minuscule) performance benefit.

  • 2
    If you can do class syntax, you also can do Object.assign. No need for jQuery. – Bergi May 10 '17 at 23:23
  • I don't see any point to make MyClassFields a constructor - it doesn't have any methods. Can you elaborate why you did this (instead of, say, a simple factory function that returns an object literal)? – Bergi May 10 '17 at 23:27
  • @Bergi - Probably force of habit rather than anything else, to be honest. Also nice call about Object.assign - didn't know about that! – Steve Childs May 11 '17 at 7:32

Well, you can declare variables inside the Constructor.

class Foo {
    constructor() {
        var name = "foo"
        this.method = function() {
            return name
        }
    }
}

var foo = new Foo()

foo.method()
  • You'll need to create an instance of this class to use this variable. Static functions cannot access that variable – Aditya Aug 30 at 12:35

This is a bit hackish combo of static and get works for me

class ConstantThingy{
        static get NO_REENTER__INIT() {
            if(ConstantThingy._NO_REENTER__INIT== null){
                ConstantThingy._NO_REENTER__INIT = new ConstantThingy(false,true);
            }
            return ConstantThingy._NO_REENTER__INIT;
        }
}

elsewhere used

var conf = ConstantThingy.NO_REENTER__INIT;
if(conf.init)...
  • 7
    I'd recommend singleton_instance as a property name so that everybody understands what you are doing here. – Bergi Sep 12 '15 at 11:35

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