11

In a word game for iPhone:

app screenshot

I'm trying to use the following code in my custom view Tile.m:

- (void)awakeFromNib
{
    [super awakeFromNib];

    static NSDictionary* const letterValues = @{
                                         @"A": @1,
                                         @"B": @4,
                                         @"C": @4,
                                         // ...
                                         @"X": @8,
                                         @"Y": @3,
                                         @"Z": @10,
                                         };

    NSString* randomLetter = [kLetters substringWithRange:[kLetters rangeOfComposedCharacterSequenceAtIndex:arc4random_uniform(kLetters.length)]];
    int letterValue = [letterValues[randomLetter] integerValue];

    _smallLetter.text = _bigLetter.text = randomLetter;
    _smallValue.text = _bigValue.text = [NSString stringWithFormat:@"%d", letterValue];
}

Unfortunately this gives me compile error Initializer element is not a compile-time constant and I have to remove the static keyword to get my app compile in Xcode (here fullscreen):

Xcode screenshot

I think I initialize the NSDictionary correctly - by using the new Objective-C Literals syntax.

But why can't I use static here?

I thought it would be appropriate here to make sure that my letterValues constant is set only once?

  • move it out from class – sage444 Mar 20 '14 at 13:21
  • Moving it out from class results in same compile-time error – Alexander Farber Mar 20 '14 at 13:22
  • @Btw., that code is valid and works in Objective-C++ :-) – Martin R Mar 20 '14 at 13:41
  • Which code is valid (the code in my question doesn't compile in Xcode 5.1) and what do you mean by Objective-C++? – Alexander Farber Mar 20 '14 at 14:20
  • 3
    @AlexanderFarber: See stackoverflow.com/questions/3684112/what-is-objective-c - Objective-C++ is the "combination" of Objective-C with C++ (and is poorly documented). Objective-C++ files have the extension .mm. Your code should compile if you rename the file to "Tile.mm", because C++ has different rules for static initializers. - But this was just meant as a remark, not as the solution. - You can also have a look at stackoverflow.com/questions/21365532/…, which is a different question with a similar answer. – Martin R Mar 20 '14 at 14:32
40

You can only set a static variable during initialization with a constant. @{} creates an object, thus not a constant.

Do this instead:

- (void)awakeFromNib
{
    [super awakeFromNib];

    static NSDictionary* letterValues = nil;

    static dispatch_once_t onceToken;
    dispatch_once(&onceToken, ^{
        letterValues = @{
          @"A": @1,
          @"B": @4,
          @"C": @4,
          // ...
          @"X": @8,
          @"Y": @3,
          @"Z": @10,
          };
    });


    ...
}

Some other answers here suggest a check for nil instead of dispatch once, but that can cause issues when creating multiple tiles at the same time (via threads). dispatch_once implements the required locking.

  • 1
    Using dispatch_once is the best and safest way to initialize this kind of data objects. This is the most correct answer here. – Leo Natan Mar 21 '14 at 13:39
5

You can use static, but the assignment can't be made on the same line. Try this:

- (void)awakeFromNib {
    [super awakeFromNib];

    static NSDictionary* letterValues = nil;
    if (!letterValues) {
        letterValues = @{@"A": @1,
                         @"B": @4,
                         @"C": @4,
                         // ...
                         @"X": @8,
                         @"Y": @3,
                         @"Z": @10};
    }
    ...
}

The reason is that the @{<key> : <value>} syntax is translated by the compiler into an Objective-C method ([[NSPlaceholderDictionary alloc] initWithObjects:forKeys:count:]), which cannot be resolved at compile-time.

1

NSDictionary objects can't be created at compile time. However, if you need a static object, you can create one. You can, for example, use the initialize method, like this:

static NSDictionary* letterValues;

+ (void)initialize
{
    if (self == [MyClass class]) {
        letterValues = @{
                         @"A": @1,
                         @"B": @4,
                         @"C": @4,
                         @"X": @8,
                         @"Y": @3,
                         @"Z": @10,
                         };
    }
}

The if statement is there to prevent multiple calls of your code in MyClass subclasses.

  • wouldn't + (void)load be more appropriate? – dwery Jan 1 '15 at 14:51
  • @dwery It really depends on your use case. See this question to find out more about the difference between load and initialize. – Adam Jan 4 '15 at 21:49

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