15

I actually develop a Windows service in VS 2012 / .NET 4.5.

The service is following the scheme of the code snippet below:

  • Using a timer
  • Executes some desired operation every couple of minutes.
  • The process takes about 10 minutes to complete
  • I use a single thread in the service

What I am worried about is that if somebody stops the service via the management console, it might be just during the process that the service is doing.

I have done some reading about stopping Windows service with request stop, but am a bit lost. Sometimes WorkerThreads are created, sometimes ManualResetEvents are created, but up to now I couldn't fully grasp the best way forward for my Windows service.

I need to wait until the processing is properly finished in the onStop method before stopping the Windows service.

What is the best way forward then, also considering the code snippet below?

Thanks all!

namespace ImportationCV
{
    public partial class ImportationCV : ServiceBase
    {
        private System.Timers.Timer _oTimer;       

        public ImportationCV()
        {
            InitializeComponent();

            if (!EventLog.SourceExists(DAL.Utilities.Constants.LOG_JOURNAL))
            {
                EventLog.CreateEventSource(DAL.Utilities.Constants.LOG_JOURNAL,     DAL.Utilities.Constants.SOURCE_JOURNAL);
            }

            EventLog.Source = DAL.Utilities.Constants.SOURCE_JOURNAL;
            EventLog.Log = DAL.Utilities.Constants.LOG_JOURNAL;
        }

        protected override void OnStart(string[] args)
        {            
            int intDelai = Properties.Settings.Default.WatchDelay * 1000;

            _oTimer = new System.Timers.Timer(intDelai);
            _oTimer.Elapsed += new ElapsedEventHandler(this.Execute);

            _oTimer.Start();           

            EventLog.WriteEntry(DAL.Utilities.Constants.LOG_JOURNAL, "Service " + DAL.Utilities.Constants.SERVICE_TITLE + " started at " + DateTime.Now.ToString("HH:mm:ss"), EventLogEntryType.Information);
        }

        protected override void OnStop()
        {

            if (_oTimer != null && _oTimer.Enabled)
            {
                _oTimer.Stop();
                _oTimer.Dispose();
            }

            EventLog.WriteEntry(DAL.Utilities.Constants.LOG_JOURNAL, "Service " + DAL.Utilities.Constants.SERVICE_TITLE + " stopped at " + DateTime.Now.ToString("HH:mm:ss"), EventLogEntryType.Information);
        }

        private void Execute(object source, ElapsedEventArgs e)
        {
            _oTimer.Stop();

            try
            {                
                //Process


            }
            catch (Exception ex)
            {
                EventLog.WriteEntry(DAL.Utilities.Constants.LOG_JOURNAL, (ex.StackTrace + ("\r\n" + ex.Message)), EventLogEntryType.Error);
            }

            _oTimer.Start();
        }
    }
}
  • I have actually been playing with this recently. While you can request more time using RequestAdditionalTime, There is no way to get windows to give you a full 10 minutes to stop. I believe the most you can get is 2. – pquest Mar 20 '14 at 13:35
  • I already look for this function, but I would like the stop is performed at the end of the process no matter how long it takes to execute. – crisjax Mar 20 '14 at 13:40
  • 1
    I understand that. Unfortunately, windows won't allow it. If it doesn't finish by its deadline, windows will kill the process. As far as I can tell, there is no way to stop that. – pquest Mar 20 '14 at 13:42
  • If i want to do that, i think i need to use thread but in my case its not the best way ? – crisjax Mar 20 '14 at 13:44
  • 2
    Your service needs to be able to deal with an incomplete run gracefully. Each time the service is started it needs to clean up. Use can pull the power cord. – paparazzo Mar 20 '14 at 14:08
19

As a test case, I put a call to System.Threading.Thread.Sleep(500000) in the OnStop() callback of my Windows service. I started the service and then stopped it. I got the window with the progress bar indicating that the Service Control Manager (SCM) was attempting to stop the service. After about 2 minutes, I got this response from the SCM:

enter image description here

After I dismissed this window, the status of my service in the SCM changed to Stopping, and I noticed that the service continued to run in Task Manager. After the sleep elapsed (nearly 6 minutes later), the process stopped. Refreshing the SCM window showed the service was no longer running.

I take a couple of things away from this. First, OnStop() should really attempt to stop the service in a timely manner just as part of playing nice with the system. Second, depending on how your OnStop() method is structured, you could force the service to ignore a preemptive request to stop, instead stopping when you say so. This is not recommended, but it appears that you could do this.

As to your particular situation, the thing you have to understand is that the System.Timers.Timer.Elapsed event fires on a ThreadPool thread. By definition, this is a background thread, which means that it will not keep the application running. When the service is told to shut down, the system will stop all background threads and then exit the process. So your concern about keeping the processing going until it is finished despite being told by the SCM to shutdown cannot occur the way you've got things structured currently. To do that, you'd need to create a formal System.Threading.Thread object, set it as a foreground thread, and then use the timer to trigger this thread to execute (as opposed to being done in the Elapsed callback).

All of that said, I still think you'll want to play nicely with the system, which means timely shutdown of the service when requested to do so. What happens if, for example, you need to reboot the machine? I haven't tested it, but if you force your service to continue running until the processing is complete, the system may indeed wait until the process finishes before actually restarting. That's not what I would want from my service.

So I would suggest one of two things. The first option would be to break the processing into distinct chunks that can be done individually. As each chunk is finished, check to see if the service is stopping. If so, exit the thread gracefully. If this cannot be done, then I would introduce something akin to transactions to your processing. Let's say that you're needing to interact with a bunch of database tables and interrupting the flow once it's started becomes problematic because the database may be left in a bad state. If the database system allows transactions, this becomes relatively easy. If not, then do all the processing you can in memory and commit the changes at the last second. That way, you only block shutting down while the changes are being committed as opposed to blocking for the entire duration. And for what it's worth, I do prefer using ManualResetEvent for communicating shutdown commands to threads.

To avoid rambling any further, I'll cut it off here. HTH.

EDIT:

This is off the cuff, so I won't verify its accuracy. I'll fix any problem you (or others) may find.

Define two ManualResetEvent objects, one for shutdown notification and one for processing notification, and the Thread object. Change the OnStart() callback to this:

using System.Threading;
using Timer = System.Timers.Timer; // both Threading and Timers have a timer class

ManualResetEvent _shutdownEvent = new ManualResetEvent(false);
ManualResetEvent _processEvent  = new ManualResetEvent(false);
Thread _thread;
Timer _oTimer;

protected override void OnStart(string[] args)
{
    // Create the formal, foreground thread.
    _thread = new Thread(Execute);
    _thread.IsBackground = false;  // set to foreground thread
    _thread.Start();

    // Start the timer.  Notice the lambda expression for setting the
    // process event when the timer elapses.
    int intDelai = Properties.Settings.Default.WatchDelay * 1000;
    _oTimer = new Timer(intDelai);
    _oTimer.AutoReset = false;
    _oTimer.Elapsed += (sender, e) => _processEvent.Set();
    _oTimer.Start();
}

Change your Execute() callback to something like this:

private void Execute()
{
    var handles = new WaitHandle[] { _shutdownEvent, _processEvent };

    while (true)
    {
        switch (WaitHandle.WaitAny(handles))
        {
            case 0:  // Shutdown Event
                return; // end the thread
            case 1:  // Process Event
                Process();
                _processEvent.Reset();  // reset for next time
                _oTimer.Start();        // trigger timer again
                break;
        }
    }
}

Create the Process() method like this:

private void Process()
{
    try
    {
        // Do your processing here.  If this takes a long time, you might
        // want to periodically check the shutdown event to see if you need
        // exit early.
    }
    catch (Exception ex)
    {
        // Do your logging here...

        // You *could * also shutdown the thread here, but this will not
        // stop the service.
        _shutdownEvent.Set();
    }
}

Finally, in the OnStop() callback, trigger the thread to shutdown:

protected override void OnStop()
{
    _oTimer.Stop();  // no harm in calling it
    _oTimer.Dispose();

    _shutdownEvent.Set();  // trigger the thread to stop
    _thread.Join();        // wait for thread to stop
}
  • Thanks for the answer. Do you have a sample of code to understand how to implement it in my code ? – crisjax Mar 20 '14 at 15:05
  • I added something to get you going. – Matt Davis Mar 20 '14 at 15:54
  • 2
    I seriously doubt a reboot will wait for a process to stop. A virus could use that to stop a reboot. A bug in the stop could stop a reboot. stackoverflow.com/questions/2008807/… – paparazzo Mar 20 '14 at 16:26
  • @Blam, like I said, I hadn't tested it. Good link. – Matt Davis Mar 20 '14 at 16:37
0

@Matt - thanks for the great code, really helpful. I found it worked even better if I added another test on _shutdownEvent:

case 1:  // Process Event
            Process();
            if(_shutdownEvent.WaitOne(0)) break; // don't loop again if a shutdown is needed
...

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