How do I optionally include an element in JSX? Here is an example using a banner that should be in the component if it has been passed in. What I want to avoid is having to duplicate HTML tags in the if statement.

render: function () {
    var banner;
    if (this.state.banner) {
        banner = <div id="banner">{this.state.banner}</div>;
    } else {
        banner = ?????
    }
    return (
        <div id="page">
            {banner}
            <div id="other-content">
                blah blah blah...
            </div>
        </div>
    );
}

27 Answers 27

up vote 145 down vote accepted

Just leave banner as being undefined and it does not get included.

  • 1
    I can't think of anything but trash next to that answer...as though I stumbled upon the gods – Timmerz Feb 1 '17 at 3:35
  • Does null work just as well as undefined? Also is that part of the spec that it works this way and thus not likely to break in the future? – hippietrail Sep 8 '17 at 4:07
  • Yes null works just fine. – Jack Allan Sep 21 '17 at 11:16

What about this. Let's define a simple helping If component.

var If = React.createClass({
    render: function() {
        if (this.props.test) {
            return this.props.children;
        }
        else {
            return false;
        }
    }
});

And use it this way:

render: function () {
    return (
        <div id="page">
            <If test={this.state.banner}>
                <div id="banner">{this.state.banner}</div>
            </If>
            <div id="other-content">
                blah blah blah...
            </div>
        </div>
    );
}

UPDATE: As my answer is getting popular, I feel obligated to warn you about the biggest danger related to this solution. As pointed out in another answer, the code inside the <If /> component is executed always regardless of whether the condition is true or false. Therefore the following example will fail in case the banner is null (note the property access on the second line):

<If test={this.state.banner}>
    <div id="banner">{this.state.banner.url}</div>
</If>

You have to be careful when you use it. I suggest reading other answers for alternative (safer) approaches.

UPDATE 2: Looking back, this approach is not only dangerous but also desperately cumbersome. It's a typical example of when a developer (me) tries to transfer patterns and approaches he knows from one area to another but it doesn't really work (in this case other template languages).

If you need a conditional element, do it like this:

render: function () {
    return (
        <div id="page">
            {this.state.banner &&
                <div id="banner">{this.state.banner}</div>}
            <div id="other-content">
                blah blah blah...
            </div>
        </div>
    );
}

If you also need the else branch, just use a ternary operator:

{this.state.banner ?
   <div id="banner">{this.state.banner}</div> :
   <div>There is no banner!</div>
}

It's way shorter, more elegant and safe. I use it all the time. The only disadvantage is that you cannot do else if branching that easily but that is usually not that common.

Anyway, this is possible thanks to how logical operators in JavaScript work. The logical operators even allow little tricks like this:

<h3>{this.state.banner.title || 'Default banner title'}</h3>
  • 1
    Thanks. I recommend reading this github.com/facebook/react/issues/690 This link has been posted in the comments bellow this question and I noticed it after I had posted my solution. If you check it, some guy mentions this solution as well but does not recommend it. I personally think it's okay, at least in the OP's case, but it's true that this way isn't perfect (there is no nice way to define else branch for example). Anyway, it's worth reading. – tobik Oct 9 '14 at 17:49
  • 1
    Not sure if this still works as the latest version seems to require the returned value to be a ReactElement – srph Jan 9 '15 at 17:26
  • 2
    not worked if u have more than one element inside "if" tag – k.makarov Jan 16 '15 at 14:17
  • 1
    If you are going to do this, there's a transpilation method that's pretty good: npmjs.com/package/jsx-control-statements – steve Mar 11 '16 at 17:50
  • 1
    Update 2 is good to go – Puce Apr 26 '16 at 10:05

Personally, I really think the ternary expressions show in http://facebook.github.io/react/tips/if-else-in-JSX.html are the most natural way that conforms with the ReactJs standards.

See the following example. It's a little messy at first sight but works quite well.

<div id="page">
  {this.state.banner ? (
    <div id="banner">
     <div class="another-div">
       {this.state.banner}
     </div>
    </div>
  ) : 
  null} 
  <div id="other-content">
    blah blah blah...
  </div>
</div>
  • Note: the brackets is the same as a component return, so your content needs to be surrounded by a <div></div>. – JoeTidee May 2 '16 at 1:16
  • @Chiedo why do you prefer the popular answer instead? This seems to work great. – Snowman Jun 3 '16 at 23:19
  • 2
    @moby I think the popular answer is more dynamic and results in a cleaner render function. With this approach, what happens if you have multiple conditionals? You'll now have a madness of nesting with this weird format and if two separate areas need the same changes based on the conditional, you now have to rewrite the conditional again. Just my opinion though! :) – Chiedo Jun 6 '16 at 11:11
  • a related page is also quite useful: facebook.github.io/react/docs/… – Neil Nov 15 '16 at 8:54

You may also write it like

{ this.state.banner && <div>{...}</div> }

If your state.banner is null or undefined, the right side of the condition is skipped.

The If style component is dangerous because the code block is always executed regardless of the condition. For example, this would cause a null exception if banner is null:

//dangerous
render: function () {
  return (
    <div id="page">
      <If test={this.state.banner}>
        <img src={this.state.banner.src} />
      </If>
      <div id="other-content">
         blah blah blah...
      </div>
    </div>
  );
}

Another option is to use an inline function (especially useful with else statements):

render: function () {
  return (
    <div id="page">
      {function(){
        if (this.state.banner) {
          return <div id="banner">{this.state.banner}</div>
        }
      }.call(this)}
      <div id="other-content">
         blah blah blah...
      </div>
    </div>
  );
}

Another option from react issues:

render: function () {
  return (
    <div id="page">
      { this.state.banner &&
        <div id="banner">{this.state.banner}</div>
      }
      <div id="other-content">
         blah blah blah...
      </div>
    </div>
  );
}
  • 2
    Of all solutions so far, the inline function seems the most elegant and straight forward. Anything that one should watch out for? – Surya Sankar Jul 12 '15 at 18:30

&& + code-style + small components

This simple test syntax + code-style convention + small focused components is for me the most readable option out there. You just need to take special care of falsy values like false, 0 or "".

render: function() {
    var person= ...; 
    var counter= ...; 
    return (
       <div className="component">
          {person && (
            <Person person={person}/>
          )}
          {(typeof counter !== 'undefined') && (
            <Counter value={counter}/>
          )}
       </div>
    );
}

do notation

ES7 stage-0 do notation syntax is also very nice and I'll definitively use it when my IDE supports it correctly:

const Users = ({users}) => (
  <div>
    {users.map(user =>
      <User key={user.id} user={user}/>
    )}
  </div>
)  

const UserList = ({users}) => do {
  if (!users) <div>Loading</div>
  else if (!users.length) <div>Empty</div>
  else <Users users={users}/>
}

More details here: ReactJs - Creating an "If" component... a good idea?

  • Free non-basic info: the first one is called short-circuit syntax – sospedra Mar 29 '17 at 9:28
  • 1
    @Deerloper I guess the difference between && and & is one of the first things we learn in computer schools, but some people may not know so it's not a bad idea to give more explanations: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Short-circuit_evaluation – Sebastien Lorber Mar 29 '17 at 9:32
  • True, but they teach it as part of the classic conditional statements. I've found a lot of people confused about using the short-circuit to render a React component ;) – sospedra Mar 30 '17 at 11:02

Simple, create a function.

renderBanner: function() {
  if (!this.state.banner) return;
  return (
    <div id="banner">{this.state.banner}</div>
  );
},

render: function () {
  return (
    <div id="page">
      {this.renderBanner()}
      <div id="other-content">
        blah blah blah...
      </div>
    </div>
  );
}

This is a pattern I personally follow all the time. Makes code really clean and easy to understand. What's more it allows you to refactor Banner into its own component if it gets too large (or re-used in other places).

  • You just saved me thanks man – t3__rry Jan 11 at 16:59

The experimental ES7 do syntax makes this easy. If you're using Babel, enable the es7.doExpressions feature then:

render() {
  return (
    <div id="banner">
      {do {
        if (this.state.banner) {
          this.state.banner;
        } else {
          "Something else";
        }
      }}
    </div>
  );
}

See http://wiki.ecmascript.org/doku.php?id=strawman:do_expressions

As already mentioned in the answers, JSX presents you with two options

  • Ternary operator

    { this.state.price ? <div>{this.state.price}</div> : null }

  • Logical conjunction

    { this.state.price && <div>{this.state.price}</div> }


However, those don't work for price == 0.

JSX will render the false branch in the first case and in case of logical conjunction, nothing will be rendered. If the property may be 0, just use if statements outside of your JSX.

  • That's not a JSX issue. It's the condition itself, even in plain JS would behave the same. If you want any number, just use typeof(this.state.price) === "number" as the condition (in either variant). – Kroltan Oct 4 '16 at 19:58

This component works when you have more than one element inside "if" branch:

    var Display = React.createClass({
        render: function() {
            if (!this.props.when) {
                return false;
            }
            return React.DOM.div(null, this.props.children);
        }
    });

Usage:

      render: function() {
            return (
                <div>
                    <Display when={this.state.loading}>
                        Loading something...
                        <div>Elem1</div>
                        <div>Elem2</div>
                    </Display>
                    <Display when={!this.state.loading}>
                        Loaded
                        <div>Elem3</div>
                        <div>Elem4</div>
                    </Display>
                </div>
            );
        },

P.s. someone think that this components are not good for code reading. But in my mind html with javascript is worse

  • Like the If answer here, this will still execute the false condition even though it's not displayed. – Keegan's hairstyle 82 Apr 15 '16 at 8:30

Most examples are with one line of "html" that is rendered conditionally. This seems readable for me when I have multiple lines that needs to be rendered conditionally.

render: function() {
  // This will be renered only if showContent prop is true
  var content = 
    <div>
      <p>something here</p>
      <p>more here</p>
      <p>and more here</p>
    </div>;

  return (
    <div>
      <h1>Some title</h1>

      {this.props.showContent ? content : null}
    </div>
  );
}

First example is good because instead of null we can conditionally render some other content like {this.props.showContent ? content : otherContent}

But if you just need to show/hide content this is even better since Booleans, Null, and Undefined Are Ignored

render: function() {
  return (
    <div>
      <h1>Some title</h1>

      // This will be renered only if showContent prop is true
      {this.props.showContent &&
        <div>
          <p>something here</p>
          <p>more here</p>
          <p>and more here</p>
        </div>
      }
    </div>
  );
}

There is another solution, if component for React:

var Node = require('react-if-comp');
...
render: function() {
    return (
        <div id="page">
            <Node if={this.state.banner}
                  then={<div id="banner">{this.state.banner}</div>} />
            <div id="other-content">
                blah blah blah...
            </div>
        </div>
    );
}

I use a more explicit shortcut: A Immediately-Invoked Function Expression (IIFE):

{(() => {
  if (isEmpty(routine.queries)) {
    return <Grid devices={devices} routine={routine} configure={() => this.setState({configured: true})}/>
  } else if (this.state.configured) {
    return <DeviceList devices={devices} routine={routine} configure={() => this.setState({configured: false})}/>
  } else {
    return <Grid devices={devices} routine={routine} configure={() => this.setState({configured: true})}/>
  }
})()}

I made https://www.npmjs.com/package/jsx-control-statements to make it a bit easier, basically it allows you to define <If> conditionals as tags and then compiles them into ternary ifs so that the code inside the <If> only gets executed if the condition is true.

There is also a really clean one line version... { this.props.product.title || "No Title" }

Ie:

render: function() {
            return (
                <div className="title">
                    { this.props.product.title || "No Title" }
                </div>
            );
        }
  • Does that work with my sample above? Where the banner div should not appear if there is no banner prop? – Jack Allan Nov 10 '15 at 10:55

I made https://github.com/ajwhite/render-if recently to safely render elements only if the predicate passes.

{renderIf(1 + 1 === 2)(
  <span>Hello!</span>
)}

or

const ifUniverseIsWorking = renderIf(1 + 1 === 2);

//...

{ifUniverseIsWorking(
  <span>Hello!</span>
)}

You can conditionally include elements using the ternary operator like so:

render: function(){

         return <div id="page">

                  //conditional statement
                  {this.state.banner ? <div id="banner">{this.state.banner}</div> : null}

                  <div id="other-content">
                      blah blah blah...
                  </div>

               </div>
}

You can use a function and return the component and keep thin the render function

class App extends React.Component {
  constructor (props) {
    super(props);
    this._renderAppBar = this._renderAppBar.bind(this);
  }

  render () {
    return <div>
      {_renderAppBar()}

      <div>Content</div>

    </div>
  }

  _renderAppBar () {
    if (this.state.renderAppBar) {
      return <AppBar />
    }
  }
}

Here is my approach using ES6.

import React, { Component } from 'react';
// you should use ReactDOM.render instad of React.renderComponent
import ReactDOM from 'react-dom';

class ToggleBox extends Component {
  constructor(props) {
    super(props);
    this.state = {
      // toggle box is closed initially
      opened: false,
    };
    // http://egorsmirnov.me/2015/08/16/react-and-es6-part3.html
    this.toggleBox = this.toggleBox.bind(this);
  }

  toggleBox() {
    // check if box is currently opened
    const { opened } = this.state;
    this.setState({
      // toggle value of `opened`
      opened: !opened,
    });
  }

  render() {
    const { title, children } = this.props;
    const { opened } = this.state;
    return (
      <div className="box">
        <div className="boxTitle" onClick={this.toggleBox}>
          {title}
        </div>
        {opened && children && (
          <div class="boxContent">
            {children}
          </div>
        )}
      </div>
    );
  }
}

ReactDOM.render((
  <ToggleBox title="Click me">
    <div>Some content</div>
  </ToggleBox>
), document.getElementById('app'));

Demo: http://jsfiddle.net/kb3gN/16688/

I'm using code like:

{opened && <SomeElement />}

That will render SomeElement only if opened is true. It works because of the way how JavaScript resolve logical conditions:

true && true && 2; // will output 2
true && false && 2; // will output false
true && 'some string'; // will output 'some string'
opened && <SomeElement />; // will output SomeElement if `opened` is true, will output false otherwise

As React will ignore false, I find it very good way to conditionally render some elements.

Maybe it helps someone who comes across the question: All the Conditional Renderings in React It's an article about all the different options for conditional rendering in React.

Key takeaways of when to use which conditional rendering:

** if-else

  • is the most basic conditional rendering
  • beginner friendly
  • use if to opt-out early from a render method by returning null

** ternary operator

  • use it over an if-else statement
  • it is more concise than if-else

** logical && operator

  • use it when one side of the ternary operation would return null

** switch case

  • verbose
  • can only be inlined with self invoking function
  • avoid it, use enums instead

** enums

  • perfect to map different states
  • perfect to map more than one condition

** multi-level/nested conditional renderings

  • avoid them for the sake of readability
  • split up components into more lightweight components with their own simple conditional rendering
  • use HOCs

** HOCs

  • use them to shield away conditional rendering
  • components can focus on their main purpose

** external templating components

  • avoid them and be comfortable with JSX and JavaScript

With ES6 you can do it with a simple one-liner

const If = ({children, show}) => show ? children : null

"show" is a boolean and you use this class by

<If show={true}> Will show </If>
<If show={false}> WON'T show </div> </If>
  • Bad. It will alway be calculated. – Qwertiy May 17 at 20:03

I don't think this has been mentioned. This is like your own answer but I think it's even simpler. You can always return strings from the expressions and you can nest jsx inside expressions, so this allows for an easy to read inline expression.

render: function () {
    return (
        <div id="page">
            {this.state.banner ? <div id="banner">{this.state.banner}</div> : ''}
            <div id="other-content">
                blah blah blah...
            </div>
        </div>
    );
}

<script src="http://dragon.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-xpf1/t39.3284-6/10574688_1565081647062540_1607884640_n.js"></script>
<script src="http://dragon.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-xpa1/t39.3284-6/10541015_309770302547476_509859315_n.js"></script>
<script type="text/jsx;harmony=true">void function() { "use strict";

var Hello = React.createClass({
  render: function() {
    return (
      <div id="page">
        {this.props.banner ? <div id="banner">{this.props.banner}</div> : ''}
        <div id="other-content">
          blah blah blah...
        </div>
      </div>
    );   
  }
});

var element = <div><Hello /><Hello banner="banner"/></div>;
React.render(element, document.body);

}()</script>

I like the explicitness of Immediately-Invoked Function Expressions (IIFE) and if-else over render callbacks and ternary operators.

render() {
  return (
    <div id="page">
      {(() => (
        const { banner } = this.state;
        if (banner) {
          return (
            <div id="banner">{banner}</div>
          );
        }
        // Default
        return (
          <div>???</div>
        );
      ))()}
      <div id="other-content">
        blah blah blah...
      </div>
    </div>
  );
}

You just need to get acquainted of the IIFE syntax, {expression} is the usual React syntax, inside it just consider that you're writing a function that is invoking itself.

function() {

}()

that need to be wrapped inside parens

(function() {

}())

There is also a technique using render props to conditional render a component. It's benefit is that the render wouldn't evaluate until the condition is met, resulting in no worries for null and undefined values.

const Conditional = ({ condition, render }) => {
  if (condition) {
    return render();
  }
  return null;
};

class App extends React.Component {
  constructor() {
    super();
    this.state = { items: null }
  }

  componentWillMount() {
    setTimeout(() => { this.setState({ items: [1,2] }) }, 2000);
  }

  render() {
    return (
      <Conditional
        condition={!!this.state.items}
        render={() => (
          <div>
            {this.state.items.map(value => <p>{value}</p>)}
          </div>
        )}
      />
    )
  }
}

When having to only render something if passed condition is fullfilled, you can use syntax:

{ condition && what_to_render }

The code in this manner would look like this :

render() {
    const { banner } = this.state;
    return (
        <div id="page">
            { banner && <div id="banner">{banner}</div> }
            <div id="other-content">
                blah blah blah...
            </div>
        </div>
    );
}

There are, of course, other valid ways to do this, it's all up to preferences and the occassion. You can learn more ways on how to do conditional rendering in React in this article if you're interested!

Just to add another option - if you like/tolerate coffee-script you can use coffee-react to write your JSX in which case if/else statements are usable as they are expressions in coffee-script and not statements:

render: ->
  <div className="container">
    {
      if something
        <h2>Coffeescript is magic!</h2>
      else
        <h2>Coffeescript sucks!</h2>
    }
  </div>  

Just to extend @Jack Allan answer with references to docs.

React basic (Quick Start) documentation suggests null in such case. However, Booleans, Null, and Undefined Are Ignored as well, mentioned in Advanced guide.

  • Corrected to clarify -- false, null, undefined, and true are valid to be ignored as well -- facebook.github.io/react/docs/…. Although, in Quick Start they prefer to advice null. – Oleg V. May 9 '17 at 5:49

Your Answer

 

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.