1

I don't like the idea of having to call hasNext() and next(), and seeing how I would need a loop to call those anyways, I don't really see much point in using the iterators given to us in Lists and Maps.

Is it only if you need to pull one this from the list? Or, if you're taking one item from the list, and having to do that for an unmeasured amount of time? I couldn't find this on Google or Stack, please help me out.

I'm not talking about an enhanced for-loop specifically (for-each loop).

I also understand that foreach loops excel in performance, but this is more of a 'why does it exist' question

EDIT: Realized I was talking about collections alone and not arrays aswel. Foreach loops don't have limitations in this situation.

  • You would have to use it when you want to remove while iterating -- which you cannot do with a foreach loop. Note that "internally" a foreach loop uses an iterator (see the javadoc for Iterable). – fge Mar 20 '14 at 16:59
  • for(int i = 0; i < list.length; i++) if(list.get(i).equals("example") list.remove(i); Wouldn't that work? – Vince Emigh Mar 20 '14 at 17:03
  • It would, yes... Matter of choice I guess ;) But hat you use here is not a foreach loop, it is a third solution :p – fge Mar 20 '14 at 17:05
  • @VinceEmigh foreach has performance advantages over for, because iterator-based access is faster than index-based access in many cases. See my answer. – aliteralmind Mar 20 '14 at 17:13
  • 1
    No, modifying the list during a for loop would not work. Let's say you have a list (a,b,c,d). If you remove a the index is still incremented and with the modified list (b,c,d) the next iteration through the loop will return c and skip over b. – the_maplebar Mar 20 '14 at 17:24
5

A foreach is equivalent to an iterator--it's syntactic sugar for the same thing. So you should always choose foreach over iterator whenever you can, simply because it's convenient and results in more concise code.

I've written about this in another answer: https://stackoverflow.com/questions/22110482/uses-and-syntax-for-for-each-loop-in-java/22110517#22110517

As stated by @RonnyShapiro, there are situations where you need to use an iterator, but in many cases a foreach should suffice. Note that a foreach is not a normal for loop. The normal for loop is needed when access to the index is required. Although you could manually create a separate index int-variable with foreach it is not ideal, from a variable-scope point of view.

Here's some more information: Which is more efficient, a for-each loop, or an iterator?

When accessing collections, a foreach is significantly faster than the basic for loop's array access. When accessing arrays, however--at least with primitive and wrapper-arrays--access via indexes is way faster. See below.


Indexes are 23-40 percent faster than iterators when accessing int or Integer arrays. Here is the output from the below testing class, which sums the numbers in a 100-element primitive-int array (A is iterator, B is index):

[C:\java_code\]java TimeIteratorVsIndexIntArray 1000000
Test A: 358,597,622 nanoseconds
Test B: 269,167,681 nanoseconds
B faster by 89,429,941 nanoseconds (24.438799231635727% faster)

[C:\java_code\]java TimeIteratorVsIndexIntArray 1000000
Test A: 377,461,823 nanoseconds
Test B: 278,694,271 nanoseconds
B faster by 98,767,552 nanoseconds (25.666236154695838% faster)

[C:\java_code\]java TimeIteratorVsIndexIntArray 1000000
Test A: 288,953,495 nanoseconds
Test B: 207,050,523 nanoseconds
B faster by 81,902,972 nanoseconds (27.844689860906513% faster)

[C:\java_code\]java TimeIteratorVsIndexIntArray 1000000
Test A: 375,373,765 nanoseconds
Test B: 283,813,875 nanoseconds
B faster by 91,559,890 nanoseconds (23.891659337194227% faster)

[C:\java_code\]java TimeIteratorVsIndexIntArray 1000000
Test A: 375,790,818 nanoseconds
Test B: 220,770,915 nanoseconds
B faster by 155,019,903 nanoseconds (40.75164734599769% faster)

[C:\java_code\]java TimeIteratorVsIndexIntArray 1000000
Test A: 326,373,762 nanoseconds
Test B: 202,555,566 nanoseconds
B faster by 123,818,196 nanoseconds (37.437545972215744% faster)

The full testing class:

   import  java.text.NumberFormat;
   import  java.util.Locale;
/**
   <P>{@code java TimeIteratorVsIndexIntArray 1000000}</P>

   @see  <CODE><A HREF="https://stackoverflow.com/questions/180158/how-do-i-time-a-methods-execution-in-java">https://stackoverflow.com/questions/180158/how-do-i-time-a-methods-execution-in-java</A></CODE>
 **/
public class TimeIteratorVsIndexIntArray  {
   public static final NumberFormat nf = NumberFormat.getNumberInstance(Locale.US);
   public static final void main(String[] tryCount_inParamIdx0)  {
      int testCount;
      //Get try-count from command-line parameter
         try  {
            testCount = Integer.parseInt(tryCount_inParamIdx0[0]);
         }  catch(ArrayIndexOutOfBoundsException | NumberFormatException x)  {
            throw  new IllegalArgumentException("Missing or invalid command line parameter: The number of testCount for each test. " + x);
         }

      //Test proper...START
         int[] intArray = new int[] {1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37, 38, 39, 40, 41, 42, 43, 44, 45, 46, 47, 48, 49, 50, 51, 52, 53, 54, 55, 56, 57, 58, 59, 60, 61, 62, 63, 64, 65, 66, 67, 68, 69, 70, 71, 72, 73, 74, 75, 76, 77, 78, 79, 80, 81, 82, 83, 84, 85, 86, 87, 88, 89, 90, 91, 92, 93, 94, 95, 96, 97, 98, 99, 100};

         long lStart = System.nanoTime();
            for(int i = 0; i < testCount; i++)  {
               testIterator(intArray);
            }
         long lADuration = outputGetNanoDuration("A", lStart);

         lStart = System.nanoTime();
            for(int i = 0; i < testCount; i++)  {
               testFor(intArray);
            }
         long lBDuration = outputGetNanoDuration("B", lStart);

         outputGetABTestNanoDifference(lADuration, lBDuration, "A", "B");
   }
      private static final void testIterator(int[] int_array)  {
         int total = 0;
         for(int i = 0; i < int_array.length; i++)  {
            total += int_array[i];
         }
      }
      private static final void testFor(int[] int_array)  {
         int total = 0;
         for(int i : int_array)  {
            total += i;
         }
      }
      //Test proper...END

//Timer testing utilities...START
   public static final long outputGetNanoDuration(String s_testName, long l_nanoStart)  {
      long lDuration = System.nanoTime() - l_nanoStart;
      System.out.println("Test " + s_testName + ": " + nf.format(lDuration) + " nanoseconds");
      return  lDuration;
   }

   public static final long outputGetABTestNanoDifference(long l_aDuration, long l_bDuration, String s_aTestName, String s_bTestName)  {
      long lDiff = -1;
      double dPct = -1.0;
      String sFaster = null;
      if(l_aDuration > l_bDuration)  {
         lDiff = l_aDuration - l_bDuration;
         dPct = 100.00 - (l_bDuration * 100.0 / l_aDuration + 0.5);
         sFaster = "B";
      }  else  {
         lDiff = l_bDuration - l_aDuration;
         dPct = 100.00 - (l_aDuration * 100.0 / l_bDuration + 0.5);
         sFaster = "A";
      }
      System.out.println(sFaster + " faster by " + nf.format(lDiff) + " nanoseconds (" + dPct + "% faster)");
      return  lDiff;
   }
//Timer testing utilities...END
}

I also ran this for an Integer array, and indexes are still the clear winner, but only between 18 and 25 percent faster.

For a List of Integers, however, iterators are faster. Just change the int-array in the above code to

List<Integer> intList = Arrays.asList(new Integer[] {1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37, 38, 39, 40, 41, 42, 43, 44, 45, 46, 47, 48, 49, 50, 51, 52, 53, 54, 55, 56, 57, 58, 59, 60, 61, 62, 63, 64, 65, 66, 67, 68, 69, 70, 71, 72, 73, 74, 75, 76, 77, 78, 79, 80, 81, 82, 83, 84, 85, 86, 87, 88, 89, 90, 91, 92, 93, 94, 95, 96, 97, 98, 99, 100});

and make the necssary changes to the test-function (int[] to List<Integer>, length to size(), etc)

[C:\java_code\]java TimeIteratorVsIndexIntegerList 1000000
Test A: 3,429,929,976 nanoseconds
Test B: 5,262,782,488 nanoseconds
A faster by 1,832,852,512 nanoseconds (34.326681820485675% faster)

[C:\java_code\]java TimeIteratorVsIndexIntegerList 1000000
Test A: 2,907,391,427 nanoseconds
Test B: 3,957,718,459 nanoseconds
A faster by 1,050,327,032 nanoseconds (26.038700083921256% faster)

[C:\java_code\]java TimeIteratorVsIndexIntegerList 1000000
Test A: 2,566,004,688 nanoseconds
Test B: 4,221,746,521 nanoseconds
A faster by 1,655,741,833 nanoseconds (38.71935684115413% faster)

[C:\java_code\]java TimeIteratorVsIndexIntegerList 1000000
Test A: 2,770,945,276 nanoseconds
Test B: 3,829,077,158 nanoseconds
A faster by 1,058,131,882 nanoseconds (27.134122749113843% faster)

[C:\java_code\]java TimeIteratorVsIndexIntegerList 1000000
Test A: 3,467,474,055 nanoseconds
Test B: 5,183,149,104 nanoseconds
A faster by 1,715,675,049 nanoseconds (32.60101667104192% faster)

[C:\java_code\]java TimeIteratorVsIndexIntList 1000000
Test A: 3,439,983,933 nanoseconds
Test B: 3,509,530,312 nanoseconds
A faster by 69,546,379 nanoseconds (1.4816434912159906% faster)

[C:\java_code\]java TimeIteratorVsIndexIntList 1000000
Test A: 3,451,101,466 nanoseconds
Test B: 5,057,979,210 nanoseconds
A faster by 1,606,877,744 nanoseconds (31.269164666060377% faster)

In one test they're almost equivalent, but still, iterator wins.

  • One more question. Does this mean foreach is a replacement for iterators? I mean, unless you only wanna grab 1 item, rather than going through the whole list, I don't see any reason for using an iterator. – Vince Emigh Mar 20 '14 at 17:36
  • There's nothing wrong with using iterators at all. foreach is simply for convenience, when you don't need to do anything except go through each element, reading them one by one, in order. I'm actually posting something more in my answer in a minute... – aliteralmind Mar 20 '14 at 17:37
  • Okay thanks :) I don't like how you'd need a loop anyways to grab multiple elements using an Iterator. If some reason comes along where you need the hasNext() next() execution to be synchronized, but not the list. It can take up some space it doesn't need to. (not memory, but visually) – Vince Emigh Mar 20 '14 at 17:41
  • Exactly: Visually, not practically. I've updated my answer to compare the timing of foreach/iterator-access versus index-access. – aliteralmind Mar 20 '14 at 18:19
  • I've made this into a blog post: aliteralmind.wordpress.com/2014/03/22/for_foreach – aliteralmind Mar 23 '14 at 1:22
1

For each was added at Java 5 for easier iteration over collections. However, it does not replace iterators as only with iterators you can modify the collection while iterating over it (via the iterator interface). Attempting to add\remove object from a collection within a for each will cause a ConcurrentModificationException.

If you're just reading values, foreach is probably better.

1

Well, Java Language Spec 8(http://docs.oracle.com/javase/specs/jls/se8/jls8.pdf),14.14.2:

The enhanced for statement is equivalent to a basic for statement of the form:

for (I #i = Expression.iterator(); #i.hasNext(); ) {
    {VariableModifier} TargetType Identifier =
    (TargetType) #i.next();
    Statement
}

So, for compiler that's the same. Earlier versions of this standard contain the same description of 'foreach' statement

0

Part of this has to do with the history of how java has developed over time. Iterators were a language feature as a way to deal with collections of objects since Java 1.2. Java 1.5 added the iterable interface and for-each loops.

Unless you need to do something specific with the iterator during your loop I would always use a for-each block ( which uses iterators in the implementation)

-3

Usually Iterator it's a bit speeder than to do a for loop using objects.get(i), but the difference has no real impact on your code. The main advantage of Iterator is that you can remove an object from the list during its crossing by calling the remove method on iterator.

  • Why would an iterator or foreach loop be faster or slower than the other? for ( Object x : objects ) { ... } is just for ( Iterator i = objects.iterator() ; i.hasNext() ; ) { Object x = i.next(); ... }. – Joshua Taylor Mar 20 '14 at 17:06
  • They're equivalent. – aliteralmind Mar 20 '14 at 17:06
  • Unless you mean a for loop with integer indices, and using objects.get(i), because that would be slower if you're using a List that has a get that's not constant time (e.g., a LinkedList). That's not a foreach loop, though, which is what the OP was asking about. – Joshua Taylor Mar 20 '14 at 17:07

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.