0

This question already has an answer here:

I'm trying to constrict a column to specific values, with no luck.
Here's what I have been trying:

mysql> CREATE TABLE my_table (
    -> name VARCHAR(20),
    -> sex CHAR(1) CHECK (sex IN('F','M'))
    -> );
Query OK, 0 rows affected (0.18 sec)

mysql> INSERT INTO my_table VALUES
    -> ('John','D');
Query OK, 1 row affected (0.07 sec)

mysql> SELECT * FROM my_table;
+------+------+
| name | sex  |
+------+------+
| John | D    |
+------+------+
1 row in set (0.00 sec)

mysql> 

as you can see, the constraint was not enforced...

marked as duplicate by Marcus Adams, Marco A., rkosegi, Joe Taras, nKn Mar 21 '14 at 13:49

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

1

This is because the CHECK clause is parsed but ignored by all storage engines.

You can create a trigger for that to check the value of Sex column before insert begins.

Try like this:

DELIMITER $$
CREATE TRIGGER `mytrigger` BEFORE INSERT ON `Table`
FOR EACH ROW
BEGIN
    IF SEX <> 'M' or SEX <> 'F' THEN
    SIGNAL SQLSTATE '123'
        SET MESSAGE_TEXT := 'check constraint on Table.Sex failed';
    END IF;
END$$   
DELIMITER ; 
0

You can do this without a trigger by using a foreign key constraint:

CREATE TABLE sexes (
  sex char(1) not null primary key
);

INSERT INTO sexes(sex)
    select 'F' union all select 'M';

CREATE TABLE my_table (
  name VARCHAR(20),
  sex CHAR(1) not null references sexes(sex)
);

There may be other reasons why you would want a code table as well. For instance, you might want to store the full name of the code.

Another approach in MySQL is to use an enumerated type for the values.

0

Replace your check constraint with a referential constraint. Add a referential constraint to some table that has a row for male and a row for female. You get one bonus with this method. You can at a later date add more genders to handle cases like earth worms.

CREATE TABLE your_table
(
name varchar(20),
gender char(1),
CONSTRAINT fk_sez FOREIGN KEY (gender)
REFERENCES sezs(gender)
)

Here's a google search for foreign key constraints tutorial

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