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What does the ^ symbol mean in the version of a dependency in package.json?

I couldn't find it in the docs.

For example:

"dependencies": {
    "grunt": "^0.4.4",
    ...
}
2

1 Answer 1

46

I found an answer here:

The caret, on the other hand, is more relaxed. It will update you to the most recent major version (the first number). ^1.2.3 will match any 1.x.x release including 1.3.0, but will hold off on 2.0.0. npm’s semantic versioning parser clarifies the distinction:

~1.2.3 := >=1.2.3-0 <1.3.0-0 "Reasonably close to 1.2.3".
^1.2.3 := >=1.2.3-0 <2.0.0-0 "Compatible with 1.2.3".

― isaacs/node-semver (emphasis added)

For completeness, the canonical documentation from the semver repository is as follows:

Caret Ranges ^1.2.3 ^0.2.5 ^0.0.4

Allows changes that do not modify the left-most non-zero element in the [major, minor, patch] tuple. In other words, this allows patch and minor updates for versions 1.0.0 and above, patch updates for versions 0.X >=0.1.0, and no updates for versions 0.0.X.

Many authors treat a 0.x version as if the x were the major "breaking-change" indicator.

Caret ranges are ideal when an author may make breaking changes between 0.2.4 and 0.3.0 releases, which is a common practice. However, it presumes that there will not be breaking changes between 0.2.4 and 0.2.5. It allows for changes that are presumed to be additive (but non-breaking), according to commonly observed practices.

  • ^1.2.3 := >=1.2.3 <2.0.0-0
  • ^0.2.3 := >=0.2.3 <0.3.0-0
  • ^0.0.3 := >=0.0.3 <0.0.4-0
  • ^1.2.3-beta.2 := >=1.2.3-beta.2 <2.0.0-0 Note that prereleases in the 1.2.3 version will be allowed, if they are greater than or equal to beta.2. So, 1.2.3-beta.4 would be allowed, but 1.2.4-beta.2 would not, because it is a prerelease of a different [major, minor, patch] tuple.
  • ^0.0.3-beta := >=0.0.3-beta <0.0.4-0 Note that prereleases in the 0.0.3 version only will be allowed, if they are greater than or equal to beta. So, 0.0.3-pr.2 would be allowed.

When parsing caret ranges, a missing patch value desugars to the number 0, but will allow flexibility within that value, even if the major and minor versions are both 0.

  • ^1.2.x := >=1.2.0 <2.0.0-0
  • ^0.0.x := >=0.0.0 <0.1.0-0
  • ^0.0 := >=0.0.0 <0.1.0-0

A missing minor and patch values will desugar to zero, but also allow flexibility within those values, even if the major version is zero.

  • ^1.x := >=1.0.0 <2.0.0-0
  • ^0.x := >=0.0.0 <1.0.0-0
1
  • Agreed. Maybe bring up an issue on GitHub?
    – rossipedia
    Mar 21, 2014 at 17:25

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