47

How to delete a non empty directory in C or C++? Is there any function? rmdir only deletes empty directory. Please provide a way without using any external library.

Also tell me how to delete a file in C or C++?

  • 6
    There is no such language as C/C++ – Benoît Feb 13 '10 at 10:26
  • 1
    Perhaps it was downvoted because the question has been asked here many times before, for example stackoverflow.com/questions/1149764/delete-folder-with-items, and people are sick of seeing it? The downvoter wasn't me, BTW. – anon Feb 13 '10 at 10:44
  • @peterchen : no, but it's the second time today lex asks about c/c++. And i guess i've seen too many resumes where people pretend they know this infamous language c/c++ which does not exist. – Benoît Feb 13 '10 at 11:34
  • 1
    @Neil - I thought the standard procedure in case of duplication was to leave a comment, not to downvote? (I know it wasn't you who downvoted, but you seem to imply that it's normal that others might do it) – Manuel Feb 13 '10 at 12:32
  • @Manuel Not everyone can vote to close, but most can downvote. – anon Feb 13 '10 at 12:50
29

You want to write a function (a recursive function is easiest, but can easily run out of stack space on deep directories) that will enumerate the children of a directory. If you find a child that is a directory, you recurse on that. Otherwise, you delete the files inside. When you are done, the directory is empty and you can remove it via the syscall.

To enumerate directories on Unix, you can use opendir, readdir, and closedir. To remove you use rmdir() on an empty directory (i.e. at the end of your function, after deleting the children) and unlink() on a file. Note that on many systems the d_type member in struct dirent is not supported; on these platforms, you will have to use stat() and S_ISDIR(stat.st_mode) to determine if a given path is a directory.

On Windows, you will use FindFirstFile()/FindNextFile() to enumerate, RemoveDirectory() on empty directories, and DeleteFile() to remove files.

Here's an example that might work on Unix (completely untested):

int remove_directory(const char *path)
{
   DIR *d = opendir(path);
   size_t path_len = strlen(path);
   int r = -1;

   if (d)
   {
      struct dirent *p;

      r = 0;

      while (!r && (p=readdir(d)))
      {
          int r2 = -1;
          char *buf;
          size_t len;

          /* Skip the names "." and ".." as we don't want to recurse on them. */
          if (!strcmp(p->d_name, ".") || !strcmp(p->d_name, ".."))
          {
             continue;
          }

          len = path_len + strlen(p->d_name) + 2; 
          buf = malloc(len);

          if (buf)
          {
             struct stat statbuf;

             snprintf(buf, len, "%s/%s", path, p->d_name);

             if (!stat(buf, &statbuf))
             {
                if (S_ISDIR(statbuf.st_mode))
                {
                   r2 = remove_directory(buf);
                }
                else
                {
                   r2 = unlink(buf);
                }
             }

             free(buf);
          }

          r = r2;
      }

      closedir(d);
   }

   if (!r)
   {
      r = rmdir(path);
   }

   return r;
}
  • reasonable answer but "easily run out of stackspace"? – peterchen Feb 13 '10 at 10:31
  • @peterchen Yes. I have seen it happen. It's also easier on Windows than POSIX, because WIN32_FIND_DATA is huge, whereas DIR * and struct dirent * are just two pointers.. – asveikau Feb 13 '10 at 10:53
  • 5
    First time I ever did this, I didn't check for "..". And yes, the result is that the program changes directory all the way to c:, and then starts deleting from there! "Luckily", it happened at work. : ) – Grimm The Opiner Mar 8 '12 at 9:35
  • Looks like a nice solution, but I included sys/stat.h at the top, but still cannot use the undefined DIR typedef. – Vijay Kumar Kanta Jan 16 '14 at 11:04
  • 2
    @Viz you want dirent.h – asveikau Jan 16 '14 at 16:09
15

Many unix-like systems (Linux, the BSDs, and OS X, at the very least) have the fts functions for directory traversal. To recursively delete a directory, just perform a depth-first traversal (without following symlinks) and delete every visited file.

int recursive_delete(const char *dir)
{
    int ret = 0;
    FTS *ftsp = NULL;
    FTSENT *curr;

    // Cast needed (in C) because fts_open() takes a "char * const *", instead
    // of a "const char * const *", which is only allowed in C++. fts_open()
    // does not modify the argument.
    char *files[] = { (char *) dir, NULL };

    // FTS_NOCHDIR  - Avoid changing cwd, which could cause unexpected behavior
    //                in multithreaded programs
    // FTS_PHYSICAL - Don't follow symlinks. Prevents deletion of files outside
    //                of the specified directory
    // FTS_XDEV     - Don't cross filesystem boundaries
    ftsp = fts_open(files, FTS_NOCHDIR | FTS_PHYSICAL | FTS_XDEV, NULL);
    if (!ftsp) {
        fprintf(stderr, "%s: fts_open failed: %s\n", dir, strerror(errno));
        ret = -1;
        goto finish;
    }

    while ((curr = fts_read(ftsp))) {
        switch (curr->fts_info) {
        case FTS_NS:
        case FTS_DNR:
        case FTS_ERR:
            fprintf(stderr, "%s: fts_read error: %s\n",
                    curr->fts_accpath, strerror(curr->fts_errno));
            break;

        case FTS_DC:
        case FTS_DOT:
        case FTS_NSOK:
            // Not reached unless FTS_LOGICAL, FTS_SEEDOT, or FTS_NOSTAT were
            // passed to fts_open()
            break;

        case FTS_D:
            // Do nothing. Need depth-first search, so directories are deleted
            // in FTS_DP
            break;

        case FTS_DP:
        case FTS_F:
        case FTS_SL:
        case FTS_SLNONE:
        case FTS_DEFAULT:
            if (remove(curr->fts_accpath) < 0) {
                fprintf(stderr, "%s: Failed to remove: %s\n",
                        curr->fts_path, strerror(errno));
                ret = -1;
            }
            break;
        }
    }

finish:
    if (ftsp) {
        fts_close(ftsp);
    }

    return ret;
}
  • 2
    Very nice example code and explanation - this should be the accepted answer. – Paul R Sep 13 '16 at 16:31
  • The fts interface is not available in musl libc. – Jonathon Reinhart May 31 '17 at 10:58
  • Is this fts-based solution less prone to the potential stack/heap overflow problems of solutions that iteratively/recursively use opendir/readdir like asveikau's ? – StoneThrow May 17 at 17:21
14

The easiest way to do this is with remove_all function of the Boost.Filesystem library. Besides, the resulting code will be portable.

If you want to write something specific for Unix (rmdir) or for Windows (RemoveDirectory) then you'll have to write a function that deletes are subfiles and subfolders recursively.

EDIT

Looks like this question was already asked, in fact someone already recommended Boost's remove_all. So please don't upvote my answer.

  • 4
    brb downloading Boost.Filesystem library on my virtualbox DOS to use on my turbo c compiler. – Dmitry Aug 12 '17 at 22:18
11

If you are using a POSIX compliant OS, you could use nftw() for file tree traversal and remove (removes files or directories). If you are in C++ and your project uses boost, it is not a bad idea to use the Boost.Filesystem as suggested by Manuel.

In the code example below I decided not to traverse symbolic links and mount points (just to avoid a grand removal:) ):

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <ftw.h>

static int rmFiles(const char *pathname, const struct stat *sbuf, int type, struct FTW *ftwb)
{
    if(remove(pathname) < 0)
    {
        perror("ERROR: remove");
        return -1;
    }
    return 0;
}

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
    if (argc != 2)
    {
        fprintf(stderr,"usage: %s path\n",argv[0]);
        exit(1);
    }

    // Delete the directory and its contents by traversing the tree in reverse order, without crossing mount boundaries and symbolic links

    if (nftw(argv[1], rmFiles,10, FTW_DEPTH|FTW_MOUNT|FTW_PHYS) < 0)
    {
        perror("ERROR: ntfw");
        exit(1);
    }

    return 0;
}
  • I'm glad someone mentioned about ntfw. :) – Unmanned Player Aug 31 '17 at 0:56
1

You can use opendir and readdir to read directory entries and unlink to delete them.

1

C++17 has <experimental\filesystem> which is based on the boost version.

Use std::experimental::filesystem::remove_all to remove recursively.

If you need more control, try std::experimental::filesystem::recursive_directory_iterator.

You can also write your own recursion with the non-resursive version of the iterator.

namespace fs = std::experimental::filesystem;
void IterateRecursively(fs::path path)
{
  if (fs::is_directory(path))
  {
    for (auto & child : fs::directory_iterator(path))
      IterateRecursively(child.path());
  }

  std::cout << path << std::endl;
}
0

unlink will delete a file.

remove will also delete a file but is more portable.

You might try system("rm -r ./path") if you're working on Linux, else there's also a Windows API recursive delete function.

  • 36
    system() is pretty much always the wrong answer. – asveikau Feb 13 '10 at 8:41
  • 5
    It has its uses, it's a quick and dirty solution. – Xorlev Feb 13 '10 at 8:43
  • what is the Windows API recursive delete function? – Manuel Feb 13 '10 at 10:12
  • 2
    It's just dirty! You might think it's quick - but some poor programmer will probably have to clear up your mess later on. – logout Feb 13 '10 at 10:39
  • 3
    If you correctly quote the argument and use the correct charset encoding and realize that "system" makes the whole program none multithreading safe (it changes the signals in a very bad way) you will understand why 'system' is pretty much always the wrong answer. – Lothar Feb 13 '10 at 11:15
0
//======================================================
// Recursely Delete files using:
//   Gnome-Glib & C++11
//======================================================

#include <iostream>
#include <string>
#include <glib.h>
#include <glib/gstdio.h>

using namespace std;

int DirDelete(const string& path)
{
   const gchar*    p;
   GError*   gerr;
   GDir*     d;
   int       r;
   string    ps;
   string    path_i;
   cout << "open:" << path << "\n";
   d        = g_dir_open(path.c_str(), 0, &gerr);
   r        = -1;

   if (d) {
      r = 0;

      while (!r && (p=g_dir_read_name(d))) {
          ps = string{p};
          if (ps == "." || ps == "..") {
            continue;
          }

          path_i = path + string{"/"} + p;


          if (g_file_test(path_i.c_str(), G_FILE_TEST_IS_DIR) != 0) {
            cout << "recurse:" << path_i << "\n";
            r = DirDelete(path_i);
          }
          else {
            cout << "unlink:" << path_i << "\n";
            r = g_unlink(path_i.c_str());
          }
      }

      g_dir_close(d);
   }

   if (r == 0) {
      r = g_rmdir(path.c_str());
     cout << "rmdir:" << path << "\n";

   }

   return r;
}
  • Surrounding your code with an explanation would seriously improve your answer. – zx485 Jan 3 '17 at 22:43
0

How to delete a non empty folder using unlinkat() in c?

Here is my work on it:

    /*
     * Program to erase the files/subfolders in a directory given as an input
     */

    #include <stdio.h>
    #include <stdlib.h>
    #include <string.h>
    #include <dirent.h>
    #include <unistd.h>
    #include <sys/types.h>
    #include <sys/stat.h>
    #include <fcntl.h>
    void remove_dir_content(const char *path)
    {
        struct dirent *de;
        char fname[300];
        DIR *dr = opendir(path);
        if(dr == NULL)
        {
            printf("No file or directory found\n");
            return;
        }
        while((de = readdir(dr)) != NULL)
        {
            int ret = -1;
            struct stat statbuf;
            sprintf(fname,"%s/%s",path,de->d_name);
            if (!strcmp(de->d_name, ".") || !strcmp(de->d_name, ".."))
                        continue;
            if(!stat(fname, &statbuf))
            {
                if(S_ISDIR(statbuf.st_mode))
                {
                    printf("Is dir: %s\n",fname);
                    printf("Err: %d\n",ret = unlinkat(dirfd(dr),fname,AT_REMOVEDIR));
                    if(ret != 0)
                    {
                        remove_dir_content(fname);
                        printf("Err: %d\n",ret = unlinkat(dirfd(dr),fname,AT_REMOVEDIR));
                    }
                }
                else
                {
                    printf("Is file: %s\n",fname);
                    printf("Err: %d\n",unlink(fname));
                }
            }
        }
        closedir(dr);
    }
    void main()
    {
        char str[10],str1[20] = "../",fname[300]; // Use str,str1 as your directory path where it's files & subfolders will be deleted.
        printf("Enter the dirctory name: ");
        scanf("%s",str);
        strcat(str1,str);
        printf("str1: %s\n",str1);
        remove_dir_content(str1); //str1 indicates the directory path
    }

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