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This is currently (by far) the fastest Javascript SHA256 implementation on mobile Safari on iPhone 4S and iPhone 5.

/** @fileOverview Javascript SHA-256 implementation.
 *
 * An older version of this implementation is available in the public
 * domain, but this one is (c) Emily Stark, Mike Hamburg, Dan Boneh,
 * Stanford University 2008-2010 and BSD-licensed for liability
 * reasons.
 *
 * Special thanks to Aldo Cortesi for pointing out several bugs in
 * this code.
 *
 * @author Emily Stark
 * @author Mike Hamburg
 * @author Dan Boneh
 */

/**
 * Context for a SHA-256 operation in progress.
 * @constructor
 * @class Secure Hash Algorithm, 256 bits.
 */
sjcl.hash.sha256 = function (hash) {
  if (!this._key[0]) { this._precompute(); }
  if (hash) {
    this._h = hash._h.slice(0);
    this._buffer = hash._buffer.slice(0);
    this._length = hash._length;
  } else {
    this.reset();
  }
};

/**
 * Hash a string or an array of words.
 * @static
 * @param {bitArray|String} data the data to hash.
 * @return {bitArray} The hash value, an array of 16 big-endian words.
 */
sjcl.hash.sha256.hash = function (data) {
  return (new sjcl.hash.sha256()).update(data).finalize();
};

sjcl.hash.sha256.prototype = {
  /**
   * The hash's block size, in bits.
   * @constant
   */
  blockSize: 512,

  /**
   * Reset the hash state.
   * @return this
   */
  reset:function () {
    this._h = this._init.slice(0);
    this._buffer = [];
    this._length = 0;
    return this;
  },

  /**
   * Input several words to the hash.
   * @param {bitArray|String} data the data to hash.
   * @return this
   */
  update: function (data) {
    if (typeof data === "string") {
      data = sjcl.codec.utf8String.toBits(data);
    }
    var i, b = this._buffer = sjcl.bitArray.concat(this._buffer, data),
        ol = this._length,
        nl = this._length = ol + sjcl.bitArray.bitLength(data);
    for (i = 512+ol & -512; i <= nl; i+= 512) {
      this._block(b.splice(0,16));
    }
    return this;
  },

  /**
   * Complete hashing and output the hash value.
   * @return {bitArray} The hash value, an array of 8 big-endian words.
   */
  finalize:function () {
    var i, b = this._buffer, h = this._h;

    // Round out and push the buffer
    b = sjcl.bitArray.concat(b, [sjcl.bitArray.partial(1,1)]);

    // Round out the buffer to a multiple of 16 words, less the 2 length words.
    for (i = b.length + 2; i & 15; i++) {
      b.push(0);
    }

    // append the length
    b.push(Math.floor(this._length / 0x100000000));
    b.push(this._length | 0);

    while (b.length) {
      this._block(b.splice(0,16));
    }

    this.reset();
    return h;
  },

  /**
   * The SHA-256 initialization vector, to be precomputed.
   * @private
   */
  _init:[],
  /*
  _init:[0x6a09e667,0xbb67ae85,0x3c6ef372,0xa54ff53a,0x510e527f,0x9b05688c,0x1f83d9ab,0x5be0cd19],
  */

  /**
   * The SHA-256 hash key, to be precomputed.
   * @private
   */
  _key:[],
  /*
  _key:
    [0x428a2f98, 0x71374491, 0xb5c0fbcf, 0xe9b5dba5, 0x3956c25b, 0x59f111f1, 0x923f82a4, 0xab1c5ed5,
     0xd807aa98, 0x12835b01, 0x243185be, 0x550c7dc3, 0x72be5d74, 0x80deb1fe, 0x9bdc06a7, 0xc19bf174,
     0xe49b69c1, 0xefbe4786, 0x0fc19dc6, 0x240ca1cc, 0x2de92c6f, 0x4a7484aa, 0x5cb0a9dc, 0x76f988da,
     0x983e5152, 0xa831c66d, 0xb00327c8, 0xbf597fc7, 0xc6e00bf3, 0xd5a79147, 0x06ca6351, 0x14292967,
     0x27b70a85, 0x2e1b2138, 0x4d2c6dfc, 0x53380d13, 0x650a7354, 0x766a0abb, 0x81c2c92e, 0x92722c85,
     0xa2bfe8a1, 0xa81a664b, 0xc24b8b70, 0xc76c51a3, 0xd192e819, 0xd6990624, 0xf40e3585, 0x106aa070,
     0x19a4c116, 0x1e376c08, 0x2748774c, 0x34b0bcb5, 0x391c0cb3, 0x4ed8aa4a, 0x5b9cca4f, 0x682e6ff3,
     0x748f82ee, 0x78a5636f, 0x84c87814, 0x8cc70208, 0x90befffa, 0xa4506ceb, 0xbef9a3f7, 0xc67178f2],
  */


  /**
   * Function to precompute _init and _key.
   * @private
   */
  _precompute: function () {
    var i = 0, prime = 2, factor;

    function frac(x) { return (x-Math.floor(x)) * 0x100000000 | 0; }

    outer: for (; i<64; prime++) {
      for (factor=2; factor*factor <= prime; factor++) {
        if (prime % factor === 0) {
          // not a prime
          continue outer;
        }
      }

      if (i<8) {
        this._init[i] = frac(Math.pow(prime, 1/2));
      }
      this._key[i] = frac(Math.pow(prime, 1/3));
      i++;
    }
  },

  /**
   * Perform one cycle of SHA-256.
   * @param {bitArray} words one block of words.
   * @private
   */
  _block:function (words) {  
    var i, tmp, a, b,
      w = words.slice(0),
      h = this._h,
      k = this._key,
      h0 = h[0], h1 = h[1], h2 = h[2], h3 = h[3],
      h4 = h[4], h5 = h[5], h6 = h[6], h7 = h[7];

    /* Rationale for placement of |0 :
     * If a value can overflow is original 32 bits by a factor of more than a few
     * million (2^23 ish), there is a possibility that it might overflow the
     * 53-bit mantissa and lose precision.
     *
     * To avoid this, we clamp back to 32 bits by |'ing with 0 on any value that
     * propagates around the loop, and on the hash state h[].  I don't believe
     * that the clamps on h4 and on h0 are strictly necessary, but it's close
     * (for h4 anyway), and better safe than sorry.
     *
     * The clamps on h[] are necessary for the output to be correct even in the
     * common case and for short inputs.
     */
    for (i=0; i<64; i++) {
      // load up the input word for this round
      if (i<16) {
        tmp = w[i];
      } else {
        a   = w[(i+1 ) & 15];
        b   = w[(i+14) & 15];
        tmp = w[i&15] = ((a>>>7  ^ a>>>18 ^ a>>>3  ^ a<<25 ^ a<<14) + 
                         (b>>>17 ^ b>>>19 ^ b>>>10 ^ b<<15 ^ b<<13) +
                         w[i&15] + w[(i+9) & 15]) | 0;
      }

      tmp = (tmp + h7 + (h4>>>6 ^ h4>>>11 ^ h4>>>25 ^ h4<<26 ^ h4<<21 ^ h4<<7) +  (h6 ^ h4&(h5^h6)) + k[i]); // | 0;

      // shift register
      h7 = h6; h6 = h5; h5 = h4;
      h4 = h3 + tmp | 0;
      h3 = h2; h2 = h1; h1 = h0;

      h0 = (tmp +  ((h1&h2) ^ (h3&(h1^h2))) + (h1>>>2 ^ h1>>>13 ^ h1>>>22 ^ h1<<30 ^ h1<<19 ^ h1<<10)) | 0;
    }

    h[0] = h[0]+h0 | 0;
    h[1] = h[1]+h1 | 0;
    h[2] = h[2]+h2 | 0;
    h[3] = h[3]+h3 | 0;
    h[4] = h[4]+h4 | 0;
    h[5] = h[5]+h5 | 0;
    h[6] = h[6]+h6 | 0;
    h[7] = h[7]+h7 | 0;
  }
};

My question is: how can this be optimized to perform better (on mobile Safari)?

I have tried poking at it from all different angles (function inlining, loop unrolling, optimizing memory management, etc.). Everything I do seems to make performance worse, not better. I have been able to get some speed improvement for desktop browsers, but not one single percent speedup on mobile Safari. Profiling was not very helpful either.

This begs some additional questions:

  • What techniques can be used to optimize code that relies heavily on bitwise operators, such as the code above? Any special profiling tools? Any special tricks?
  • Any tricks when optimizing Javascript code for mobile platforms? What should I be looking at first? Any references I can use as a guide?

Anybody who is actually able to provide a version with a decent speedup (on mobile Safari) will be rewarded with bounty points (and with the World Wide Web's eternal gratitude). I know this is a very tough problem, but it is also a very important one to solve.

  • 4
    After looking through the snippet - you are using the 'optimized' code, in such that it relies on bitwise operators as opposed to heavier power operations. Until mobile Safari has access to hardware level batch matrix calculations this sadly appears to be the limit. – Adrian Seeley Mar 26 '14 at 13:46
  • Do you have a reference to where that code came from? I'm interested in which particular BSD license they used. – Anti-weakpasswords Mar 30 '14 at 5:01
  • The code is from the SJCL Javascript crypto library. – user2398029 Apr 10 '14 at 0:52
1

The cycle looks very much like its C equivalent so I doubt it can be improved more than marignally. Note that the "precompute" function appears suboptimal and could be improved in many ways. Considering the prime checking is done 64 times, that might be useful:

If I understand your algorithm correctly, you should have 2 as a special case (processed first), start at 3 and do +=2 to cut down in half.

in code:

outer: for (; i<64; prime++) {
      if (prime % factor === 0) continue outer;
      for (factor=3; factor*factor +1 <= prime; factor+=2) {
        if (prime % factor === 0) {
          // not a prime
          continue outer;
        }
      }

Even better (yet still easy) if you're just trying to tell if a number is prime is to build the list as you go and only check against known primes. Let me know if you need me to do this in javascript if it's of any use. Or use

primes = [2,3,5,7,11,13,17,19,23,29,31,37,41,43,47,53,59,61,67,71,73,79,83,89,97,101,103,107,109,113,127,131,137,139,149,151,157,163,167,173,179,181,191,193,197,199,211,223,227,229,233,239,241,251,257,263,269,271,277,281,283,293,307,311,313,317,331]

and replace prime by primes[i], remove all that prime generation loop

 if (i<8) {
        this._init[i] = frac(Math.pow(primes[i], 1/2));
      }
      this._key[i] = frac(Math.pow(primes[i], 1/3));
      i++;
  • Hey, thanks for the input. The _precompute function outputs a constant value - it has fixed input. However, that might still be a worthy improvement to the SJCL code. – user2398029 Mar 26 '14 at 20:52

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