I have a MySQL database with a table that has 2 million rows using innodb engine. I want to add another column, but I keep getting the following error:

Error 1062: Duplicate entry '' for key 'PRIMARY' SQL Statement: ALTER TABLE `mydb`.`table`  ADD COLUMN `country` VARCHAR(35) NULL DEFAULT NULL AFTER `email` 

How can I add the column without getting this error?

EDIT: Table definition

id int(11) NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,   
user_id varchar(45) NOT NULL,   
first_name varchar(150) DEFAULT NULL,   
last_name varchar(150) DEFAULT NULL,   
gender varchar(10) DEFAULT NULL,   
email varchar(100) DEFAULT NULL,   
created_at bigint(20) DEFAULT NULL,   
updated_at bigint(20) DEFAULT NULL,  
PRIMARY KEY (`id`,`user_id`),   
UNIQUE KEY `user_id_UNIQUE` (`user_id`),   
KEY `first_name` (`first_name`),   
KEY `last_name` (`last_name`)

EDIT #2: SHOW INDEXES output

Table       Non_unique  Key_name        Seq_in_index  Column_name     Collation  Cardinality Index_type
table       0           PRIMARY         1             id              A          3516446     BTREE      
table       0           PRIMARY         2             user_id         A          3516446     BTREE
table       0           user_id_UNIQUE  1             user_id         A          3516446     BTREE
table       1           first_name      1             first_name      A          390716      BTREE  
table       1           last_name       1             last_name       A          439555      BTREE
  • 1
    Try removing the after old_column. – Gordon Linoff Mar 22 '14 at 16:50
  • Tried it, still produced the same error – Hank Mar 22 '14 at 16:54
  • 2
    Can you show your current table definition? – juergen d Mar 22 '14 at 16:56
  • What does SHOW INDEXES FROM mydb.table return? – George Mar 24 '14 at 19:42
  • 2
    It's strange to define your PK over (id,user_id) here: it permits you to have multiple records with the same id value provided that their user_id values differ, however if you always rely on AUTO_INCREMENT then id values will necessarily differ. Furthermore, user_id values must always differ because of the user_id_UNIQUE constraint. This arrangement can lead to strange data, but I can't see how there can be duplicate PK values of '' unless the index has been corrupted. – eggyal Mar 24 '14 at 19:52

If it's not something a program needs to do (altering tables dynamically), then just wait a moment and then try again! It worked for me. :) I guess there are some InnoDB-specific processes/states (maybe still processing another ALTER queried just a moment ago?), during which the ALTER command would fail, and you just need to catch a moment when it succeeds.

  • 2
    I had the same issue, and waiting for a long running process to end helped, so it might be a locking issue with a wrong error message. – Andris Feb 22 '15 at 23:11

it solution will lock table on write, but often suitable for solving the problem if table is not very big

LOCK TABLES my_table WRITE;

ALTER TABLE my_table ADD COLUMN ts DATETIME NULL AFTER id;

UNLOCK TABLES;

When running an online ALTER TABLE operation, the thread that runs the ALTER TABLE operation will apply an “online log” of DML operations that were run concurrently on the same table from other connection threads. When the DML operations are applied, it is possible to encounter a duplicate key entry error (ERROR 1062 (23000): Duplicate entry), even if the duplicate entry is only temporary and would be reverted by a later entry in the “online log”. This is similar to the idea of a foreign key constraint check in InnoDB in which constraints must hold during a transaction.

I've runned the same code and it works fine. http://sqlfiddle.com/#!2/1937e

As a solution, I would try to recreate the table , copy the data into it, and then switch tables using rename.

  • If that doesn't work then it's clear that it's a bug with your current mysql configuration, and we'll need more details to figure it out or at least reproduce it (mysql version, mysql config, database settings, the actual data, etc.).
  • If it works then it probably was a problem with tables or indexes and here are a few things you can check (you can also start with these if you don't wish to recreate the table):
    1. Check that you don't have any triggers that are causing other inserts
    2. Check that you are just creating a column and not adding other keys/indexes
    3. Check that the auto_increment value is not overflowing (for int it's over 2,000,000,000)

If none of the above, then you probably have a some corrupt data, or you missed to share some details.

I guess there are some other ALTERs or INSERTs which are still processing.

First, to check the processing triggers with this following queries:

SHOW FULL PROCESSLIST;
SELECT * FROM information_schema.INNODB_TRX\G

Then, kill the locked query by trx_mysql_thread_id: 132092 for example:

KILL 132092;

Finally, here‘s a solution - OnlineSchemaChange (OSC). It built by Facebook supports online alter MySQL table schema with minimal impact.

use change column

ALTER TABLE database.table_name CHANGE COLUMN id id INT(11) NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT , ADD PRIMARY KEY (id);

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