179

I have a specific function that I want to be executed after 5 seconds. How can i do that in Java?

I found javax.swing.timer, but I can't really understand how to use it. It looks like I'm looking for something way simpler then this class provides.

Please add a simple usage example.

2
  • Do you want to wait 5 seconds and then execute something or do you want to continue doing something else in the 5 seconds? Feb 13, 2010 at 15:38
  • i want to continue doing something else
    – ufk
    Feb 13, 2010 at 15:40

12 Answers 12

276
new java.util.Timer().schedule( 
        new java.util.TimerTask() {
            @Override
            public void run() {
                // your code here
            }
        }, 
        5000 
);

EDIT:

javadoc says:

After the last live reference to a Timer object goes away and all outstanding tasks have completed execution, the timer's task execution thread terminates gracefully (and becomes subject to garbage collection). However, this can take arbitrarily long to occur.

6
  • 2
    If you run that code, you'll leak threads. Make sure to clean up the timer when you've finished.
    – skaffman
    Feb 13, 2010 at 15:40
  • 1
    @skaffman: I added a statement from the javadoc. Do you really have to clean up after calling schedule?
    – tangens
    Feb 13, 2010 at 15:47
  • 1
    It might be OK, but then it might not be. If you run that code fragment multiple times, you'll have loose threads kicking about with no means of tidying them up.
    – skaffman
    Feb 13, 2010 at 15:51
  • 5
    import java.util.Timer; import java.util.TimerTask; might make it more obvious that this is not javax.swing.Timer. / Note, if you are using Swing (and actually AWT) you shouldn't be doing anything to change components on non-Event Dispatch Thread (EDT) threads (java.util.Timer tasks bad; javax.swing.Timer actions good). Feb 13, 2010 at 19:08
  • 2
    @PaulAlexander According to the docs - calling timer's cancel method at the end of the run method would clear up the TimerTasks' execution thread.
    – Dandalf
    Feb 24, 2018 at 21:59
68

Something like this:

// When your program starts up
ScheduledExecutorService executor = Executors.newSingleThreadScheduledExecutor();

// then, when you want to schedule a task
Runnable task = ....    
executor.schedule(task, 5, TimeUnit.SECONDS);

// and finally, when your program wants to exit
executor.shutdown();

There are various other factory methods on Executor which you can use instead, if you want more threads in the pool.

And remember, it's important to shutdown the executor when you've finished. The shutdown() method will cleanly shut down the thread pool when the last task has completed, and will block until this happens. shutdownNow() will terminate the thread pool immediately.

2
  • 1
    shutdown() does not block. awaitTermination() does.
    – Yonas
    May 19, 2021 at 11:04
  • shutdown() just doesn't allow new tasks to be submitted. shutdownNow() also interrupts the tasks (not necessarily terminating immedietely).
    – dan1st
    Jun 25, 2021 at 8:19
29

Example of using javax.swing.Timer

Timer timer = new Timer(3000, new ActionListener() {
  @Override
  public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent arg0) {
    // Code to be executed
  }
});
timer.setRepeats(false); // Only execute once
timer.start(); // Go go go!

This code will only be executed once, and the execution happens in 3000 ms (3 seconds).

As camickr mentions, you should lookup "How to Use Swing Timers" for a short introduction.

2
  • Just that Go go go! :-) Dec 17, 2020 at 13:05
  • worked like a charm! I think this is the most efficient way. Oct 10, 2021 at 17:12
17

As a variation of @tangens answer: if you can't wait for the garbage collector to clean up your thread, cancel the timer at the end of your run method.

Timer t = new java.util.Timer();
t.schedule( 
        new java.util.TimerTask() {
            @Override
            public void run() {
                // your code here
                // close the thread
                t.cancel();
            }
        }, 
        5000 
);
2
  • Shouldn't Timer t be declared final since it's being accessed inside an inner class? Feb 3, 2019 at 17:38
  • 1
    @JoshuaPinter Yes, it should be declared final but it does not need to be explicitly declared final in at least Java 8. It just needs to be "effectively final" (javarevisited.blogspot.com/2015/03/…)
    – Dandalf
    Feb 4, 2019 at 16:47
8

My code is as follows:

new java.util.Timer().schedule(

    new java.util.TimerTask() {
        @Override
        public void run() {
            // your code here, and if you have to refresh UI put this code: 
           runOnUiThread(new   Runnable() {
                  public void run() {
                            //your code

                        }
                   });
        }
    }, 
    5000 
);
5

Your original question mentions the "Swing Timer". If in fact your question is related to SWing, then you should be using the Swing Timer and NOT the util.Timer.

Read the section from the Swing tutorial on "How to Use Timers" for more information.

4

you could use the Thread.Sleep() function

Thread.sleep(4000);
myfunction();

Your function will execute after 4 seconds. However this might pause the entire program...

5
  • And it only guarantees that the execution will run after 4sec, which could mean after 10 sec as well!
    – questzen
    Feb 13, 2010 at 22:28
  • 2
    questzen, you'll find that all the methods here do that. In fact, even if you're scheduling something at the OS level, you generally can only guarantee a minimum elapsed time before an event.
    – Ethan
    Mar 21, 2013 at 5:19
  • This is not what actual question was Jun 16, 2017 at 18:35
  • I just had to give this a downvote - not at all an answer to the question at hand.
    – theMayer
    Jul 24, 2018 at 19:10
  • OP said in a comment "i want to continue doing something else"; this code obviously, doesn't. Mar 2, 2019 at 21:14
3

All other unswers require to run your code inside a new thread. In some simple use cases you may just want to wait a bit and continue execution within the same thread/flow.

Code below demonstrates that technique. Keep in mind this is similar to what java.util.Timer does under the hood but more lightweight.

import java.util.concurrent.TimeUnit;
public class DelaySample {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
       DelayUtil d = new DelayUtil();
       System.out.println("started:"+ new Date());
       d.delay(500);
       System.out.println("half second after:"+ new Date());
       d.delay(1, TimeUnit.MINUTES); 
       System.out.println("1 minute after:"+ new Date());
    }
}

DelayUtil Implementation

import java.util.concurrent.TimeUnit;
import java.util.concurrent.locks.Condition;
import java.util.concurrent.locks.ReentrantLock;

public class DelayUtil {
    /** 
    *  Delays the current thread execution. 
    *  The thread loses ownership of any monitors. 
    *  Quits immediately if the thread is interrupted
    *  
    * @param duration the time duration in milliseconds
    */
   public void delay(final long durationInMillis) {
      delay(durationInMillis, TimeUnit.MILLISECONDS);
   }

   /** 
    * @param duration the time duration in the given {@code sourceUnit}
    * @param unit
    */
    public void delay(final long duration, final TimeUnit unit) {
        long currentTime = System.currentTimeMillis();
        long deadline = currentTime+unit.toMillis(duration);
        ReentrantLock lock = new ReentrantLock();
        Condition waitCondition = lock.newCondition();

        while ((deadline-currentTime)>0) {
            try {
                lock.lockInterruptibly();    
                waitCondition.await(deadline-currentTime, TimeUnit.MILLISECONDS);
            } catch (InterruptedException e) {
                Thread.currentThread().interrupt();
                return;
            } finally {
                lock.unlock();
            }
            currentTime = System.currentTimeMillis();
        }
    }
}
3

ScheduledThreadPoolExecutor has this ability, but it's quite heavyweight.

Timer also has this ability but opens several thread even if used only once.

Here's a simple implementation with a test (signature close to Android's Handler.postDelayed()):

public class JavaUtil {
    public static void postDelayed(final Runnable runnable, final long delayMillis) {
        final long requested = System.currentTimeMillis();
        new Thread(new Runnable() {
            @Override
            public void run() {
                // The while is just to ignore interruption.
                while (true) {
                    try {
                        long leftToSleep = requested + delayMillis - System.currentTimeMillis();
                        if (leftToSleep > 0) {
                            Thread.sleep(leftToSleep);
                        }
                        break;
                    } catch (InterruptedException ignored) {
                    }
                }
                runnable.run();
            }
        }).start();
    }
}

Test:

@Test
public void testRunsOnlyOnce() throws InterruptedException {
    long delay = 100;
    int num = 0;
    final AtomicInteger numAtomic = new AtomicInteger(num);
    JavaUtil.postDelayed(new Runnable() {
        @Override
        public void run() {
            numAtomic.incrementAndGet();
        }
    }, delay);
    Assert.assertEquals(num, numAtomic.get());
    Thread.sleep(delay + 10);
    Assert.assertEquals(num + 1, numAtomic.get());
    Thread.sleep(delay * 2);
    Assert.assertEquals(num + 1, numAtomic.get());
}
2
  • it gives warning sleep called in a loop
    – shareef
    Feb 21, 2017 at 15:23
  • The while is just to ignore interruption. Jul 6, 2020 at 13:42
2
public static Timer t;

public synchronized void startPollingTimer() {
        if (t == null) {
            TimerTask task = new TimerTask() {
                @Override
                public void run() {
                   //Do your work
                }
            };

            t = new Timer();
            t.scheduleAtFixedRate(task, 0, 1000);
        }
    }
1
  • 3
    While this code may answer the question, providing additional context regarding why and/or how this code answers the question improves its long-term value.
    – Mateus
    Jul 28, 2017 at 14:48
0

I think in this case :

import javax.swing.*;
import java.awt.event.ActionListener;

is the best. When the Question is prevent Ui stack or a progress not visible before a heavy work or network call. We can use the following methods (from my experience) :

Run a method after one Second :

 public static void startMethodAfterOneSeconds(Runnable runnable) {
        Timer timer = new Timer(1000, new ActionListener() {
            @Override
            public void actionPerformed(java.awt.event.ActionEvent e) {
                runnable.run();
            }

        });
        timer.setRepeats(false); // Only execute once
        timer.start(); 
    }

Run a method after n second once, Non repeating :

public static void startMethodAfterNMilliseconds(Runnable runnable, int milliSeconds) {
    Timer timer = new Timer(milliSeconds, new ActionListener() {
        @Override
        public void actionPerformed(java.awt.event.ActionEvent e) {
            runnable.run();
        }

    });
    timer.setRepeats(false); // Only execute once
    timer.start(); 
}

Run a method after n seconds, and repeat :

 public static void repeatMethodAfterNMilliseconds(Runnable runnable, int milliSeconds) {
        Timer timer = new Timer(milliSeconds, new ActionListener() {
            @Override
            public void actionPerformed(java.awt.event.ActionEvent e) {
                runnable.run();
            }

        });
        timer.setRepeats(true); // Only execute once
        timer.start(); 
    }

And the Usage :

 startMethodAfterNMilliseconds(new Runnable() {
            @Override
            public void run() {
                // myMethod(); // Your method goes here. 
            }
        }, 1000);
-1

Perhaps the most transparent way is to use the postDelayed function of the Handler class the following way:

new Handler().postDelayed(this::function, 1000);

or you can implement the function inside, for example:

new Handler().postDelayed(() -> System.out.println("A second later"), 1000);

Where the first argument is the function, the second argument is the delay time in milliseconds. In the first example, the name of the called function is "function".

2
  • Can you please update the answer with a sample program with appropriate import statements and also mention on which java version, it can run successfully. Sep 25, 2021 at 16:12
  • 2
    Your answer could be improved with additional supporting information. Please edit to add further details, such as citations or documentation, so that others can confirm that your answer is correct. You can find more information on how to write good answers in the help center.
    – Community Bot
    Sep 25, 2021 at 16:12

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