15

'man uniq' documents the -f=N and -s=N options which make uniq skip the first N fields/characters respectively when comparing lines, but how would you force uniq to skip the last N fields/characters?

19

If you want the functionality of sorting first and then keeping only one line for each unique combination of the fields you are sorting on, you can make do with the unix utility sort alone.

As an example, consider the following file, named some_data

a;c;4
a;b;9
a;b;6

We want to sort by the first and second field, and leave the third field alone, so we do a stable sort, like this:

$ sort -k1,1 -k2,2 -t';' --stable some_data

which gives

a;b;9
a;b;6
a;c;4

Now say we'd like to keep only unique combinations of the first and second column. Then we'd do this:

$ sort -k1,1 -k2,2 -t';' --stable --unique some_data

which gives

a;b;9
a;c;4
1
  • This is exactly what I wanted, actually, since sort has better control over what counts as a field than uniq does. Thanks!
    – Nick Felt
    Jun 17 '13 at 17:21
17

you will need to sort your data first if you want to use uniq

 sort file | rev | uniq -f 10 | rev
1
  • 1
    uniq without sort removes consecutive identical line which can definitely be useful. Feb 13 '10 at 17:56
11

rev $filename | sort | uniq -f=N | rev

2
  • 3
    anyone care to come up with an argument as to why this behaviour isn't incorporated into uniq as a command line switch/option?
    – Juliusz
    Feb 19 '10 at 12:23
  • 3
    reversing before sorting messes things up, as you will then be sorting by the reverse content of the field(s) you want to ignore (and the reverse content of the rest of your lines) ... sort file | rev | uniq -f=N | rev as indicated in the accepted answer is the way to go.
    – trs
    Dec 21 '16 at 3:44

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