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I have come across a very odd problem in C that I have never encountered before. I have narrowed it down to the following very simple snippet.

The variables are global and of type:

    int cpd;
    int nPart;

And here is the relevant code snippet which I gradually stripped down to the very minimum needed to produce the issue:

    printf("\ncpd1: %d\n",cpd);

    int p;
    for(p=1;p<=nPart;p++)
    {
        printf("\ncpd2: %d\n",cpd); exit(0);
    }

...The output I get is this:

cpd1: 17

cpd2: 0

How on earth is this possible?! cpd has NOT been reassigned, NO functions have been called... yet it changed? HOW?!?!

This has been driving me slowly insane for quite some time now... ... so any ideas?

thanks for your time, Ben.

EDIT: and when I remove -02 from the makefile arguments to gcc, BOTH the print statements tell me that cpd = 0!

EDIT: Okay, I just found that a variable that is declared globally once, initialised as 4.0, and then never modified is now apparently 1.51086e-311 ... Something is very wrong somewhere...

EDIT: SOLVED!: I had an array of size 1000 that needed to be over 4000, and trying to write to this was corrupting the memory around it. Thing is, this array is NOT accessed anywhere near those print statements, it is accessed in the same function however, much earlier on (large function!). The weird discrepancy between print statements must be some weird artifact of using -O2, as without -O2, both prints of cpd print the corrupted version. Thank you everyone, I wouldnt have worked this out without your help!

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    Post something that compiles. – Alok Singhal Feb 13 '10 at 18:14
  • What you have here shouldn't have the bug you're describing. Can you give some more information about your program? Is it multithreaded? What toolchain? – Carl Norum Feb 13 '10 at 18:17
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    "cpd has NOT been reassigned, NO functions have been called... yet it changed? HOW?!?!" Should we believe your diagnosis or the symptom? It's clearly changed and your speculation (stripping down) is probably flawed somewhere. catb.org/~esr/faqs/smart-questions.html#symptoms – mmx Feb 13 '10 at 18:18
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    I completed your program by putting the code in a main function and initializing cpd to 17 and nPart to 1 as suggested by your output. My program output 17 and 17. The problem in your code is elsewhere. – CB Bailey Feb 13 '10 at 18:18
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    @user272491: then your problem is somewhere else. Use a debugger, set a watchpoint on your variable, and good luck! Compile your code with maximum warnings and that might help too. – Alok Singhal Feb 13 '10 at 18:26
15

Stack frame corruption due to buffer overflow is the usual explanation for this. Here's an example:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>

int main()
{
  int cpd;
  char msg[4];
  cpd = 17;
  printf("%d\n", cpd);
  strcpy(msg, "Oops");
  printf("%d\n", cpd);
  return 0;
}

Output:

17
0

The "msg" string buffer is too short by one character, the string terminator overwrites the value of "cpd".

The best way to find the cause is to use the data breakpoint feature of the debugger. Set a regular breakpoint on the function entry point. Then find the address of the "cpd" variable and a set a byte-size data breakpoint on it. The debugger will stop as soon as the cpd value changes.

Beware that this won't necessarily work in optimized code, the "cpd" value might be stored in a register. Which is another possible explanation why its value is different in separate statements.

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  • Interesting... but is there any way that this could happen without the strcpy between the print statements; just the integer declaration and start of a for-loop that I have? – Ben Feb 13 '10 at 19:02
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    +1. I Agree that a buffer overrun is usually the cause of these "magic" errors. – Per Knytt Feb 13 '10 at 19:03
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    Or a pointer write, effectively the same thing. Look for pointer writes to variables declared adjacent to cpd, they are the most likely, and trap in the debugger with break on value change. – Martin Feb 13 '10 at 19:05
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    +1 Ooh good one - didn't think of that. – zebrabox Feb 13 '10 at 19:08
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    I <3 you all! I had an array of size 1000 that needed to be over 4000. Thing is, this array is NOT accessed anywhere near those print statements, it is accessed in the same function however, much earlier on. The weird discrepancy between print statements must be some weird artifact of using -O2, as without -O2, both prints of cpd print the corrupted version. Thank you everyone, I wouldnt have worked this out without your help! – Ben Feb 13 '10 at 19:33
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Only possible reason I can think of is that you have another local int cpd variable declared. As an example, I took your code and slightly modified it to add another int cpd declaration and left it uninitialised:
Note I had to set nPart = 1 so the for loop executed at least once

#include <stdio.h>

int cpd;
int nPart = 1;

int main (int argc, char ** argv)
{
 printf("\ncpd1: %d\n",cpd);
 int cpd;


    int p;

    for(p=1;p<=nPart;p++)
    {
        printf("\ncpd2: %d\n",cpd); 
  break;
 }
}

When I ran it, I got the following output:
cpd1: 0

cpd2: 2130567168

As expected, the global variable cpd is 0, the local cpd is uninitialised and can be pretty much any 32 bit value.

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    +1: I hadn't thought about shadowing. – Alok Singhal Feb 13 '10 at 18:28
  • I have scoured my program for all instances of cpd, and this is not the case. I also do set the variables to nPart = 40000 and cpd = 17 before this code is reached. – Ben Feb 13 '10 at 18:34
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That which is posted could not do that. The only explanation is that something else is changing cpd, or cpd has multiple instances.

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  • I am not a C expert, but I know enough C to know that this should be impossible, yet it definitely is happening... which is why this is so confusing. – Ben Feb 13 '10 at 18:30
  • There's no magic here. The computer is doing exactly what it understands. The goal is to find where you've led it astray. – wallyk Feb 13 '10 at 18:33
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int main() {
    int cpd = 13;
    int nPart = 17;

    printf("\ncpd1: %d\n",cpd);

    int p;

    for(p=1;p<=nPart;p++) {
            printf("\ncpd2: %d\n",cpd);
    }

    exit(0);
}

This compiles and runs with expected output for me. Have I incorrectly reproduced your example, or is the lack of a closing brace on the end of your for loop (and inclusion of subsequent exit(0) purposeful?

Edit: assume proper includes.

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    That's not the same as having the cpd/nPart global - ie. outside the main – Martin Beckett Feb 13 '10 at 18:23
  • OP says cpd and nPart are global. – Carl Norum Feb 13 '10 at 18:23
  • Same for me. I tried reproducing this in a stand-alone problem, and the issue doesnt occur. I didn't bother including beyond the brace, because with the exit(0); there it is irrelevant. A closing brace does exist, and I've tried removing everything else in the loop. The issue still occurs. – Ben Feb 13 '10 at 18:29
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You need to post a complete, minimal, compilable program. For example, the following program:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

int cpd = 17;
int nPart = 10;

int main(void)
{
    int p;

    printf("\ncpd1: %d\n",cpd);

    for(p=1;p<=nPart;p++)
    {
        printf("\ncpd2: %d\n",cpd); exit(0);
    }
    return 0;
}

prints 17 twice.

Note:

  • nPart is initialized to >= 1, otherwise the loop doesn't execute even once.
  • I included stdio.h and stdlib.h for printf() and exit() respectively.
  • I left the exit(0); call inside the loop—not sure why you have it there since that means the loop will execute at most once.
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  • I made this same program, and there is indeed not an issue. The exit(0) was there to help me narrow down the problem, it is not an intended function of the code! Between 2 print statements there is the code: "int p; for(p=1;p<=nPart;p++) {" and the problem occurs. I just dont see how this is possible! – Ben Feb 13 '10 at 18:37
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If the minimal code snippet you posted does indeed reproduce the problem, then the only explanation here is that your compiler is hopelessly broken and generates meaningless broken code.

However, I strongly suspect that the snippet you posted is not really complete (it is obviously non-compilable) and the problem lies somewhere in the code you omitted.

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  • The snippet is copied exactly as it appears in my code. There indeed is a lot of extra code, but not between those two print statements- that is really all there is. My compiler is gcc from the ubuntu repositories (or does it even come preinstalled?), so I doubt that that is the problem too. – Ben Feb 13 '10 at 19:00
  • Well, then the most likely explanation is either someone changing your cpd or there's another local cpd declared between the prints. – AnT Feb 13 '10 at 19:08
-1

An unintialized variable can have any value, typically in debug build it will be set to zero, but you can't rely on this.

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    Globals have static storage class by default. I guess those are auto initialized. – mmx Feb 13 '10 at 18:16
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    But shouldn't the same value be printed both times anyway? – IVlad Feb 13 '10 at 18:17
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    The memory that is dedicated to global variables is set to only 0 bits – anthares Feb 13 '10 at 18:17
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    +1 for @anthares and @Mehrdad. Globals are automatically initialized to zero. – Carl Norum Feb 13 '10 at 18:23
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    @anthares: Memory for global/satic variables is not set to 0 bits. Instead, the variables are guaranteed to be properly zero-initialized. If on some platform null-pointer of some type is physically represented by 0xFFFFAAAA pattern, then the corresponding global/static pointer variables are automatically set to 0xFFFFAAAA pattern. – AnT Feb 13 '10 at 18:52

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