26

I am a C++ newbie.I tried out my first program here.To my eyes this program is correct.

#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

class mystruct
{
    private:
        int m_a;
        float m_b;

    public:
        mystruct(int x, float y)
        {
                m_a = x;
                m_b = y;
        }

};


int main()
{

        mystruct m = mystruct(5,3.14);

        cout << "my structure " << m << endl;

        return 0;
}

However I am getting sooo many errors.Can't figure out why?

cout.cpp: In function ‘int main()’:
cout.cpp:26:29: error: no match for ‘operator<<’ in ‘std::operator<< [with _Traits = std::char_traits<char>]((* & std::cout), ((const char*)"my structure ")) << m’
cout.cpp:26:29: note: candidates are:
/usr/include/c++/4.6/ostream:110:7: note: std::basic_ostream<_CharT, _Traits>::__ostream_type& std::basic_ostream<_CharT, _Traits>::operator<<(std::basic_ostream<_CharT, _Traits>::__ostream_type& (*)(std::basic_ostream<_CharT, _Traits>::__ostream_type&)) [with _CharT = char, _Traits = std::char_traits<char>, std::basic_ostream<_CharT, _Traits>::__ostream_type = std::basic_ostream<char>]
/usr/include/c++/4.6/ostream:110:7: note:   no known conversion for argument 1 from ‘mystruct’ to ‘std::basic_ostream<char>::__ostream_type& (*)(std::basic_ostream<char>::__ostream_type&) {aka std::basic_ostream<char>& (*)(std::basic_ostream<char>&)}’
/usr/include/c++/4.6/ostream:119:7: note: std::basic_ostream<_CharT, _Traits>::__ostream_type& std::basic_ostream<_CharT, _Traits>::operator<<(std::basic_ostream<_CharT, _Traits>::__ios_type& (*)(std::basic_ostream<_CharT, _Traits>::__ios_type&)) [with _CharT = char, _Traits = std::char_traits<char>, std::basic_ostream<_CharT, _Traits>::__ostream_type = std::basic_ostream<char>, std::basic_ostream<_CharT, _Traits>::__ios_type = std::basic_ios<char>]
/usr/include/c++/4.6/ostream:119:7: note:   no known conversion for argument 1 from ‘mystruct’ to ‘std::basic_ostream<char>::__ios_type& (*)(std::basic_ostream<char>::__ios_type&) {aka std::basic_ios<char>& (*)(std::basic_ios<char>&)}’
/usr/include/c++/4.6/ostream:129:7: note: std::basic_ostream<_CharT, _Traits>::__ostream_type& std::basic_ostream<_CharT, _Traits>::operator<<(std::ios_base& (*)(std::ios_base&)) [with _CharT = char, _Traits = std::char_traits<char>, std::basic_ostream<_CharT, _Traits>::__ostream_type = std::basic_ostream<char>]
/usr/include/c++/4.6/ostream:129:7: note:   no known conversion for argument 1 from ‘mystruct’ to ‘std::ios_base& (*)(std::ios_base&)’
/usr/include/c++/4.6/ostream:167:7: note: std::basic_ostream<_CharT, _Traits>::__ostream_type& std::basic_ostream<_CharT, _Traits>::operator<<(long int) [with _CharT = char, _Traits = std::char_traits<char>, std::basic_ostream<_CharT, _Traits>::__ostream_type = std::basic_ostream<char>]
/usr/include/c++/4.6/ostream:167:7: note:   no known conversion for argument 1 from ‘mystruct’ to ‘long int’
/usr/include/c++/4.6/ostream:171:7: note: std::basic_ostream<_CharT, _Traits>::__ostream_type& std::basic_ostream<_CharT, _Traits>::operator<<(long unsigned int) [with _CharT = char, _Traits = std::char_traits<char>, std::basic_ostream<_CharT, _Traits>::__ostream_type = std::basic_ostream<char>]
/usr/include/c++/4.6/ostream:171:7: note:   no known conversion for argument 1 from ‘mystruct’ to ‘long unsigned int’
/usr/include/c++/4.6/ostream:175:7: note: std::basic_ostream<_CharT, _Traits>::__ostream_type& std::basic_ostream<_CharT, _Traits>::operator<<(bool) [with _CharT = char, _Traits = std::char_traits<char>, std::basic_ostream<_CharT, _Traits>::__ostream_type = std::basic_ostream<char>]
/usr/include/c++/4.6/ostream:175:7: note:   no known conversion for argument 1 from ‘mystruct’ to ‘bool’
/usr/include/c++/4.6/bits/ostream.tcc:93:5: note: std::basic_ostream<_CharT, _Traits>& std::basic_ostream<_CharT, _Traits>::operator<<(short int) [with _CharT = char, _Traits = std::char_traits<char>]
/usr/include/c++/4.6/bits/ostream.tcc:93:5: note:   no known conversion for argument 1 from ‘mystruct’ to ‘short int’
/usr/include/c++/4.6/ostream:182:7: note: std::basic_ostream<_CharT, _Traits>::__ostream_type& std::basic_ostream<_CharT, _Traits>::operator<<(short unsigned int) [with _CharT = char, _Traits = std::char_traits<char>, std::basic_ostream<_CharT, _Traits>::__ostream_type = std::basic_ostream<char>]
/usr/include/c++/4.6/ostream:182:7: note:   no known conversion for argument 1 from ‘mystruct’ to ‘short unsigned int’
/usr/include/c++/4.6/bits/ostream.tcc:107:5: note: std::basic_ostream<_CharT, _Traits>& std::basic_ostream<_CharT, _Traits>::operator<<(int) [with _CharT = char, _Traits = std::char_traits<char>]
/usr/include/c++/4.6/bits/ostream.tcc:107:5: note:   no known conversion for argument 1 from ‘mystruct’ to ‘int’
/usr/include/c++/4.6/ostream:193:7: note: std::basic_ostream<_CharT, _Traits>::__ostream_type& std::basic_ostream<_CharT, _Traits>::operator<<(unsigned int) [with _CharT = char, _Traits = std::char_traits<char>, std::basic_ostream<_CharT, _Traits>::__ostream_type = std::basic_ostream<char>]
/usr/include/c++/4.6/ostream:193:7: note:   no known conversion for argument 1 from ‘mystruct’ to ‘unsigned int’
/usr/include/c++/4.6/ostream:202:7: note: std::basic_ostream<_CharT, _Traits>::__ostream_type& std::basic_ostream<_CharT, _Traits>::operator<<(long long int) [with _CharT = char, _Traits = std::char_traits<char>, std::basic_ostream<_CharT, _Traits>::__ostream_type = std::basic_ostream<char>]
/usr/include/c++/4.6/ostream:202:7: note:   no known conversion for argument 1 from ‘mystruct’ to ‘long long int’
/usr/include/c++/4.6/ostream:206:7: note: std::basic_ostream<_CharT, _Traits>::__ostream_type& std::basic_ostream<_CharT, _Traits>::operator<<(long long unsigned int) [with _CharT = char, _Traits = std::char_traits<char>, std::basic_ostream<_CharT, _Traits>::__ostream_type = std::basic_ostream<char>]
/usr/include/c++/4.6/ostream:206:7: note:   no known conversion for argument 1 from ‘mystruct’ to ‘long long unsigned int’
/usr/include/c++/4.6/ostream:211:7: note: std::basic_ostream<_CharT, _Traits>::__ostream_type& std::basic_ostream<_CharT, _Traits>::operator<<(double) [with _CharT = char, _Traits = std::char_traits<char>, std::basic_ostream<_CharT, _Traits>::__ostream_type = std::basic_ostream<char>]
/usr/include/c++/4.6/ostream:211:7: note:   no known conversion for argument 1 from ‘mystruct’ to ‘double’
/usr/include/c++/4.6/ostream:215:7: note: std::basic_ostream<_CharT, _Traits>::__ostream_type& std::basic_ostream<_CharT, _Traits>::operator<<(float) [with _CharT = char, _Traits = std::char_traits<char>, std::basic_ostream<_CharT, _Traits>::__ostream_type = std::basic_ostream<char>]
/usr/include/c++/4.6/ostream:215:7: note:   no known conversion for argument 1 from ‘mystruct’ to ‘float’
/usr/include/c++/4.6/ostream:223:7: note: std::basic_ostream<_CharT, _Traits>::__ostream_type& std::basic_ostream<_CharT, _Traits>::operator<<(long double) [with _CharT = char, _Traits = std::char_traits<char>, std::basic_ostream<_CharT, _Traits>::__ostream_type = std::basic_ostream<char>]
/usr/include/c++/4.6/ostream:223:7: note:   no known conversion for argument 1 from ‘mystruct’ to ‘long double’
/usr/include/c++/4.6/ostream:227:7: note: std::basic_ostream<_CharT, _Traits>::__ostream_type& std::basic_ostream<_CharT, _Traits>::operator<<(const void*) [with _CharT = char, _Traits = std::char_traits<char>, std::basic_ostream<_CharT, _Traits>::__ostream_type = std::basic_ostream<char>]
/usr/include/c++/4.6/ostream:227:7: note:   no known conversion for argument 1 from ‘mystruct’ to ‘const void*’
/usr/include/c++/4.6/bits/ostream.tcc:121:5: note: std::basic_ostream<_CharT, _Traits>& std::basic_ostream<_CharT, _Traits>::operator<<(std::basic_ostream<_CharT, _Traits>::__streambuf_type*) [with _CharT = char, _Traits = std::char_traits<char>, std::basic_ostream<_CharT, _Traits>::__streambuf_type = std::basic_streambuf<char>]
/usr/include/c++/4.6/bits/ostream.tcc:121:5: note:   no known conversion for argument 1 from ‘mystruct’ to ‘std::basic_ostream<char>::__streambuf_type* {aka std::basic_streambuf<char>*}’
/usr/include/c++/4.6/bits/basic_string.h:2693:5: note: template<class _CharT, class _Traits, class _Alloc> std::basic_ostream<_CharT, _Traits>& std::operator<<(std::basic_ostream<_CharT, _Traits>&, const std::basic_string<_CharT, _Traits, _Alloc>&)
/usr/include/c++/4.6/ostream:451:5: note: template<class _CharT, class _Traits> std::basic_ostream<_CharT, _Traits>& std::operator<<(std::basic_ostream<_CharT, _Traits>&, _CharT)
/usr/include/c++/4.6/ostream:456:5: note: template<class _CharT, class _Traits> std::basic_ostream<_CharT, _Traits>& std::operator<<(std::basic_ostream<_CharT, _Traits>&, char)
/usr/include/c++/4.6/ostream:462:5: note: template<class _Traits> std::basic_ostream<char, _Traits>& std::operator<<(std::basic_ostream<char, _Traits>&, char)
/usr/include/c++/4.6/ostream:468:5: note: template<class _Traits> std::basic_ostream<char, _Traits>& std::operator<<(std::basic_ostream<char, _Traits>&, signed char)
/usr/include/c++/4.6/ostream:473:5: note: template<class _Traits> std::basic_ostream<char, _Traits>& std::operator<<(std::basic_ostream<char, _Traits>&, unsigned char)
/usr/include/c++/4.6/ostream:493:5: note: template<class _CharT, class _Traits> std::basic_ostream<_CharT, _Traits>& std::operator<<(std::basic_ostream<_CharT, _Traits>&, const _CharT*)
/usr/include/c++/4.6/bits/ostream.tcc:323:5: note: template<class _CharT, class _Traits> std::basic_ostream<_CharT, _Traits>& std::operator<<(std::basic_ostream<_CharT, _Traits>&, const char*)
/usr/include/c++/4.6/ostream:510:5: note: template<class _Traits> std::basic_ostream<char, _Traits>& std::operator<<(std::basic_ostream<char, _Traits>&, const char*)
/usr/include/c++/4.6/ostream:523:5: note: template<class _Traits> std::basic_ostream<char, _Traits>& std::operator<<(std::basic_ostream<char, _Traits>&, const signed char*)
/usr/include/c++/4.6/ostream:528:5: note: template<class _Traits> std::basic_ostream<char, _Traits>& std::operator<<(std::basic_ostream<char, _Traits>&, const unsigned char*)
2
  • 2
    The compiler doesn't know how you want your structure printed. You need to tell it by giving it a function called operator<< that takes an ostream and your type as parameters. Only then will it know how you want your structure printed. forums.codeguru.com/… Commented Mar 23, 2014 at 7:30
  • What happens if mystruct has a cast converter to string? Does it still need a << overloading? Commented May 28, 2020 at 5:01

6 Answers 6

25

You need to overload operator << for mystruct class

Something like :-

friend ostream& operator << (ostream& os, const mystruct& m)
{
    os << m.m_a <<" " << m.m_b << endl;
    return os ;
}

See here

2
  • Why it has to be a friend function? It can be a member function right? I tried without friend, but get many error messages (First one is: error: 'std::ostream& mystruct::operator<<(std::ostream&, const mystruct&)' must take exactly one argument|)
    – Rajesh
    Commented Apr 20, 2018 at 3:33
  • @Rajesh It's because the reference to the ostream object has to be the first parameter. The same goes for the stream insertion operator as well. Since they take the user-defined object as the second parameter they must be implemented as a non-member function. They are usually implemented as friend functions because it allows them to access private attributes of a user-defined type, which is sometimes the only way to access them, if the user-defined type has not exposed them through getters.
    – Gigaxel
    Commented May 15, 2018 at 8:12
8

There's only one error:

cout.cpp:26:29: error: no match for ‘operator<<’ in ‘std::operator<< [with _Traits = std::char_traits]((* & std::cout), ((const char*)"my structure ")) << m’

This means that the compiler couldn't find a matching overload for operator<<. The rest of the output is the compiler listing operator<< overloads that didn't match. The third line actually says this:

cout.cpp:26:29: note: candidates are:

6

Obviously, the standard library provided operator does not know what to do with your user defined type mystruct. It only works for predefined data types. To be able to use it for your own data type, You need to overload operator << to take your user defined data type.

0

You can just get:

#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

class Mystruct
{
    private:
        int m_a;
        float m_b;

    public:
        //get the value
        int m_getA() {return m_a;} //get the value m_a
        float m_getB() {return m_b;} //get the value m_b

        //set
        void mystruct(int x, float y)
        {
            m_a = x; //set m_a
            m_b = y; //set m_b
        }
};


int main()
{

        Mystruct m;
        m.mystruct(5, 3.14);

        cout << "my structure m(" 
             << m.m_getA() << ","  //use the method to get m_a
             << m.m_getB() << ")"  //use the method to get m_b
             << endl;

        return 0;
}

1
  • 1
    Please add further details to expand on your answer, such as working code or documentation citations.
    – Community Bot
    Commented Aug 31, 2021 at 8:40
0

I think that you need to create an object file and use it to get the result

#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

class Mystruct
{
    private:
        int m_a;
        float m_b;

    public:
        mystruct(int x, float y)
        {
                m_a = x;
                m_b = y;
        }

};


int main()
{
    Mystruct objectname; //creating the object file of the class;
    float variable = objectname.mystruct(5,3.14);

    cout << "my structure " << variable << endl;

    return 0;
}
-2

Object is a collection of methods and variables.You can't print the variables in object by just cout operation . if you want to show the things inside the object you have to declare either a getter or a display text method in class.

ex

#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

class mystruct

{
private:
    int m_a;
    float m_b;

public:
    mystruct(int x, float y)
    {
            m_a = x;
            m_b = y;
    }
    public:
    void getm_aAndm_b()
    {
        cout<<m_a<<endl;
        cout<<m_b<<endl;
    }



};

int main()
{

    mystruct m = mystruct(5,3.14);

    cout << "my structure " << endl;
    m.getm_aAndm_b();
    return 0;

}

Not that this is just a one way of doing it

3
  • 1
    you can print if you provide the right overload and the right definition of the << operator. Commented Mar 23, 2014 at 7:44
  • Thanks for the advice. But i believe for the better programming practice and pure object orientation .We should always respect to the rules declared by the "smalltalk" . Then you see the encapsulation of the code is well protected Commented Mar 23, 2014 at 7:49
  • 1
    I believe it is way more elegant to overload the << operator. :)
    – Campa
    Commented Oct 4, 2018 at 9:57

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