Getting strange behavior when calling function outside of a closure:

  • when function is in a object everything is working
  • when function is in a class get :

Task not serializable: java.io.NotSerializableException: testing

The problem is I need my code in a class and not an object. Any idea why this is happening? Is a Scala object serialized (default?)?

This is a working code example:

object working extends App {
    val list = List(1,2,3)

    val rddList = Spark.ctx.parallelize(list)
    //calling function outside closure 
    val after = rddList.map(someFunc(_))

    def someFunc(a:Int)  = a+1

    after.collect().map(println(_))
}

This is the non-working example :

object NOTworking extends App {
  new testing().doIT
}

//adding extends Serializable wont help
class testing {  
  val list = List(1,2,3)  
  val rddList = Spark.ctx.parallelize(list)

  def doIT =  {
    //again calling the fucntion someFunc 
    val after = rddList.map(someFunc(_))
    //this will crash (spark lazy)
    after.collect().map(println(_))
  }

  def someFunc(a:Int) = a+1
}
  • What is Spark.ctx? There is no Spark object with method ctx AFAICT – javadba Oct 30 '14 at 15:39
up vote 246 down vote accepted

I don't think the other answer is entirely correct. RDDs are indeed serializable, so this is not what's causing your task to fail.

Spark is a distributed computing engine and its main abstraction is a resilient distributed dataset (RDD), which can be viewed as a distributed collection. Basically, RDD's elements are partitioned across the nodes of the cluster, but Spark abstracts this away from the user, letting the user interact with the RDD (collection) as if it were a local one.

Not to get into too many details, but when you run different transformations on a RDD (map, flatMap, filter and others), your transformation code (closure) is:

  1. serialized on the driver node,
  2. shipped to the appropriate nodes in the cluster,
  3. deserialized,
  4. and finally executed on the nodes

You can of course run this locally (as in your example), but all those phases (apart from shipping over network) still occur. [This lets you catch any bugs even before deploying to production]

What happens in your second case is that you are calling a method, defined in class testing from inside the map function. Spark sees that and since methods cannot be serialized on their own, Spark tries to serialize the whole testing class, so that the code will still work when executed in another JVM. You have two possibilities:

Either you make class testing serializable, so the whole class can be serialized by Spark:

import org.apache.spark.{SparkContext,SparkConf}

object Spark {
  val ctx = new SparkContext(new SparkConf().setAppName("test").setMaster("local[*]"))
}

object NOTworking extends App {
  new Test().doIT
}

class Test extends java.io.Serializable {
  val rddList = Spark.ctx.parallelize(List(1,2,3))

  def doIT() =  {
    val after = rddList.map(someFunc)
    after.collect().foreach(println)
  }

  def someFunc(a: Int) = a + 1
}

or you make someFunc function instead of a method (functions are objects in Scala), so that Spark will be able to serialize it:

import org.apache.spark.{SparkContext,SparkConf}

object Spark {
  val ctx = new SparkContext(new SparkConf().setAppName("test").setMaster("local[*]"))
}

object NOTworking extends App {
  new Test().doIT
}

class Test {
  val rddList = Spark.ctx.parallelize(List(1,2,3))

  def doIT() =  {
    val after = rddList.map(someFunc)
    after.collect().foreach(println)
  }

  val someFunc = (a: Int) => a + 1
}

Similar, but not the same problem with class serialization can be of interest to you and you can read on it in this Spark Summit 2013 presentation.

As a side note, you can rewrite rddList.map(someFunc(_)) to rddList.map(someFunc), they are exactly the same. Usually, the second is preferred as it's less verbose and cleaner to read.

EDIT (2015-03-15): SPARK-5307 introduced SerializationDebugger and Spark 1.3.0 is the first version to use it. It adds serialization path to a NotSerializableException. When a NotSerializableException is encountered, the debugger visits the object graph to find the path towards the object that cannot be serialized, and constructs information to help user to find the object.

In OP's case, this is what gets printed to stdout:

Serialization stack:
    - object not serializable (class: testing, value: testing@2dfe2f00)
    - field (class: testing$$anonfun$1, name: $outer, type: class testing)
    - object (class testing$$anonfun$1, <function1>)
  • 1
    Hmm, what you have explained certainly makes sense, and explains why the entire class get's serialized (something I didn't fully understand). Nevertheless I'll still hold that rdd's are not serializable (well they extend Serializable, but that doesn't mean they dont cause NotSerializableException, try it). This is why if you put them outside classes it fixes the error. I'm going edit my answer a little to be more precise about what I mean - i.e. they cause the exception, not that they extend the interface. – samthebest Mar 24 '14 at 18:51
  • 22
    In case you don't have control over the class you need to be serializable... if you are using Scala you can just instantiate it with Serializable: val test = new Test with Serializable – Mark S Aug 11 '14 at 17:17
  • 1
    "rddList.map(someFunc(_)) to rddList.map(someFunc), they are exactly the same" No they are not exactly the same, and in fact using the latter can cause serialisation exceptions were the former wouldn't. – samthebest Feb 23 '16 at 15:50
  • 1
    @GregaKešpret any idea how to get his issue resolved in spark-shell? – Meisam Emamjome Jun 17 '16 at 9:00
  • 1
    @GregaKešpret Have you tried if the second solution without class inheriting from Serializable works? my understanding is that as the map(someFunc) is really map(this.someFunc) this should still result to an attempt to serializing the full class. One way to avoid it is to define a limited scope and take the this pointer out of the loop: ` val someFuncLocal = someFunc` – x89a10 Jun 30 '16 at 22:29

Grega's answer is great in explaining why the original code does not work and two ways to fix the issue. However, this solution is not very flexible; consider the case where your closure includes a method call on a non-Serializable class that you have no control over. You can neither add the Serializable tag to this class nor change the underlying implementation to change the method into a function.

Nilesh presents a great workaround for this, but the solution can be made both more concise and general:

def genMapper[A, B](f: A => B): A => B = {
  val locker = com.twitter.chill.MeatLocker(f)
  x => locker.get.apply(x)
}

This function-serializer can then be used to automatically wrap closures and method calls:

rdd map genMapper(someFunc)

This technique also has the benefit of not requiring the additional Shark dependencies in order to access KryoSerializationWrapper, since Twitter's Chill is already pulled in by core Spark

  • Hi, I wonder do I need to register something if I use your code? I tried and get a Unable find class exception from kryo. THX – G_cy Nov 11 '16 at 7:50

Complete talk fully explaining the problem, which proposes a great paradigm shifting way to avoid these serialization problems: https://github.com/samthebest/dump/blob/master/sams-scala-tutorial/serialization-exceptions-and-memory-leaks-no-ws.md

The top voted answer is basically suggesting throwing away an entire language feature - that is no longer using methods and only using functions. Indeed in functional programming methods in classes should be avoided, but turning them into functions isn't solving the design issue here (see above link).

As a quick fix in this particular situation you could just use the @transient annotation to tell it not to try to serialise the offending value (here, Spark.ctx is a custom class not Spark's one following OP's naming):

@transient
val rddList = Spark.ctx.parallelize(list)

You can also restructure code so that rddList lives somewhere else, but that is also nasty.

The Future is Probably Spores

In future Scala will include these things called "spores" that should allow us to fine grain control what does and does not exactly get pulled in by a closure. Furthermore this should turn all mistakes of accidentally pulling in non-serializable types (or any unwanted values) into compile errors rather than now which is horrible runtime exceptions / memory leaks.

http://docs.scala-lang.org/sips/pending/spores.html

A tip on Kryo serialization

When using kyro, make it so that registration is necessary, this will mean you get errors instead of memory leaks:

"Finally, I know that kryo has kryo.setRegistrationOptional(true) but I am having a very difficult time trying to figure out how to use it. When this option is turned on, kryo still seems to throw exceptions if I haven't registered classes."

Strategy for registering classes with kryo

Of course this only gives you type-level control not value-level control.

... more ideas to come.

  • How is the @transient member reinitialized after deserialization? – Jonathan Neufeld Mar 31 '15 at 19:48
  • It's not - it's telling the JVM that we are not going to need this field after deserialization (if you try to use it you will get a NPE). – samthebest Apr 1 '15 at 9:18
  • @samthebest confused on one thing you say, just learning Kryo, if it can't serialize a class, it's a memory leak? Or just unneeded use of too much memory? Thanks for making this point, this CS student is now reading about Java memory leaks. But are you saying it's just slow garbage collection, or Kryo will cause a really nasty leak? – JimLohse Jan 8 '16 at 16:17
  • 1
    @jimlohse If you capture an instance of some Type X in a closure each task will need to deserialize that instance and keep a copy of it. If you have 60 cores on a machine, then you will likely have at least 60 instances duplicated in memory at any one time PLUS a bunch of nasty overhead created by deserialization. Yes GC will remove these instances, so not a "leak" in the classical meaning, more like "unnecessary duplication". If the instance is large, like a big lookup, you might not have enough memory for all the copies and the JVM blows up .... – samthebest Jan 10 '16 at 10:18
  • 1
    @jimlohse Finally, if you make registration of types necessary for use in closures, then at least if you did such a thing by mistake you would be told early on. It doesn't solve the problem, it can just in some cases help you avoid it. – samthebest Jan 10 '16 at 10:21

I solved this problem using a different approach. You simply need to serialize the objects before passing through the closure, and de-serialize afterwards. This approach just works, even if your classes aren't Serializable, because it uses Kryo behind the scenes. All you need is some curry. ;)

Here's an example of how I did it:

def genMapper(kryoWrapper: KryoSerializationWrapper[(Foo => Bar)])
               (foo: Foo) : Bar = {
    kryoWrapper.value.apply(foo)
}
val mapper = genMapper(KryoSerializationWrapper(new Blah(abc))) _
rdd.flatMap(mapper).collectAsMap()

object Blah(abc: ABC) extends (Foo => Bar) {
    def apply(foo: Foo) : Bar = { //This is the real function }
}

Feel free to make Blah as complicated as you want, class, companion object, nested classes, references to multiple 3rd party libs.

KryoSerializationWrapper refers to: https://github.com/amplab/shark/blob/master/src/main/scala/shark/execution/serialization/KryoSerializationWrapper.scala

  • Does this actually serialize up the instance or create a static instance and serialize up a reference (see my answer). – samthebest Jul 2 '14 at 12:25
  • 2
    @samthebest could you elaborate? If you investigate KryoSerializationWrapper you'll find that it makes Spark think that it is indeed java.io.Serializable - it simply serializes the object internally using Kryo - faster, simpler. And I don't think it deals with a static instance - it just de-serializes the value when the value.apply() is called. – Nilesh Jul 2 '14 at 18:07

I'm not entirely certain that this applies to Scala but, in Java, I solved the NotSerializableException by refactoring my code so that the closure did not access a non-serializable final field.

  • i am facing the same problem in Java, i am trying to use FileWriter class from Java IO package inside RDD foreach method. Can you please let me know how we can solve this. – Shankar Jul 23 '15 at 8:46
  • 1
    Well @Shankar, if the FileWriter is a final field of the outer class, you can't do it. But FileWriter can be constructed from a String or a File, both of which are Serializable. So refactor your code to construct a local FileWriter based on the filename from the outer class. – Trebor Rude Jul 23 '15 at 16:10

I faced similar issue, and what I understand from Grega's answer is

object NOTworking extends App {
 new testing().doIT
}
//adding extends Serializable wont help
class testing {

val list = List(1,2,3)

val rddList = Spark.ctx.parallelize(list)

def doIT =  {
  //again calling the fucntion someFunc 
  val after = rddList.map(someFunc(_))
  //this will crash (spark lazy)
  after.collect().map(println(_))
}

def someFunc(a:Int) = a+1

}

your doIT method is trying to serialize someFunc(_) method, but as method are not serializable, it tries to serialize class testing which is again not serializable.

So make your code work, you should define someFunc inside doIT method. For example:

def doIT =  {
 def someFunc(a:Int) = a+1
  //function definition
 }
 val after = rddList.map(someFunc(_))
 after.collect().map(println(_))
}

And if there are multiple functions coming into picture, then all those functions should be available to the parent context.

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