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In my last question @Borodin commented my question with:

You should start by removing Modern::Perl and namespace::sweep. Modules that behave as pragma should be avoided.

I'm confused a bit, because:

The use namespace::autoclean bit is simply good code hygiene, as it removes imported symbols from your class's namespace at the end of your package's compile cycle, including Moose keywords. Once the class has been built, these keywords are not needed. (This is preferred to placing no Moose at the end of your package).

In the Book Intermediate perl recommending to use the namespace::autoclean too.

Yes, I'm used the instead of the autoclean the sweep module - because again from the doccu

This pragma was written to address some problems with the excellent namespace::autoclean. In particular, namespace::autoclean will remove special symbols that are installed by overload, so you can't use namespace::autoclean on objects that overload Perl operators.

... ...

In most cases, namespace::sweep should work as a drop-in replacement for namespace::autoclean. Upon release, this pragma passes all of namespace::autoclean's tests, in addition to its own.

And because I'm an perl beginner, i'm really confused. For me, when i reading: this module addressing some problems of another module - mean: use this one.

'Manual (where from I should learn) says "use it" and expert from stackoverflow teling: don't use it.

So please, can someone explain me:

  • it is correct to use namespace::sweep or I should use namespace::autoclean or none of them?
  • if none, why the BestPractices recommends it?

For the `ModernPerl'. Sure, I'm probably don't understand deeply and "exactly" what is does. What i know, (again from it's doccu)

This enables the strict and warnings pragmas, as well as all of the features available in Perl 5.10. It also enables C3 method resolution order as documented in perldoc mro and loads IO::File and IO::Handle so that you may call methods on filehandles. In the future, it may include additional core modules and pragmas.

Sure, don't deeply understand to mro, only think it is an answer to the "deadly diamond of death" problem in cases of multiple inheritance.

Up to today, i was really happy with it, because it is shorting for me the needed pragmas:

use strict;
use warnings;
use feature 'say';

So, what is a "status" of the "Modern::Perl" (and other similar cpanm modules)? Allowed to use, or not?

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    You've already got my answer since you cited my book. The advice that you should avoid modules that act as modules is a bit weird since pragmata are modules. – brian d foy Mar 24 '14 at 2:11
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    @briandfoy: What I said was "Modules that behave as pragma should be avoided". I was referring to Modern::Perl, whose capitalisation implies that it adds functionality but makes no other change to the context of the following code. Its behaviour belies that. I am happy with namespace::autoclean where it is likely to help, but I believe that the boilerplate for the majority of simple Perl programs should be use strict and use warnings, and no more – Borodin Mar 24 '14 at 3:57
  • @Borodin sorry, You said: 'remove namespace::sweep'. I will cotinue to use namespace::autoclean or namespace::sweep - because it is recommented (as a good code hygiene). Anyway, from now - i will not use the Modern::Perl - so, your comment teached me something new. Thank you. – kobame Mar 24 '14 at 11:03
  • I don't think Modern::Perl implies any of that. All sorts of non-pragma modules change the context of the following code. – brian d foy Mar 24 '14 at 23:16
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On your question about namespace::sweep:

Firstly, take note of the actual problem that namespace::sweep resolves.

In particular, namespace::autoclean will remove special symbols that are installed by overload, so you can't use namespace::autoclean on objects that overload Perl operators.

What this means is that if your class has overloaded operators they won't work if you also use namespace::autoclean. But this problem only occurs if you use overload. Other than that, namespace::autoclean will suffice.

Secondly, it says that namespace::sweep can be used instead of namespace::autoclean:

In most cases, namespace::sweep should work as a drop-in replacement for namespace::autoclean. Upon release, this pragma passes all of namespace::autoclean's tests, in addition to its own.

So to answer your question, "is it correct to use namespace::sweep or I should use namespace::autoclean or none of them?"

  1. You should use at least one of them as recommended by Moose Best Practices.
  2. It is generally ok to use namespace::sweep since it says it is designed to do so and it passes all of namespace::autoclean's tests.
  3. In spite of point 2 above, if you don't use overload then you don't have a problem with using namespace::autoclean, so you could just use that in this case.
  • Thank you for explanation. I was used the namespace::sweep because i was not sure about the overload (I'm still only learning perl). The merit of the original question is around the module "Path::Class" what is overloading the "string" context. Probably it is safe to use namespace::autoclean. – kobame Mar 24 '14 at 11:08
  • namespace::autoclean only breaks overloading in the package it's imported into. Using it for your package won't break overloading in another package (Path::Class). Personally I prefer namespace::sweep over namespace::autoclean not just because of the overloading issue, but also because it works better for non-Moose classes. (FWIW, I prefer Path::Tiny over Path::Class too.) – tobyink Mar 24 '14 at 11:47
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Specifying use 5.014; (or other version >= 5.011) will automatically do use strict; and enable all features of that version for you; IMO this is some of the reason Modern::Perl has not gained a whole lot of traction.

I've always disliked Modern::Perl because it doesn't describe what it does; it is someone else's idea of "modern" as of some fixed point in the past.

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    Modern::Perl has the oddity that you can't tell how much it is going to do if you don't know which version you have. – brian d foy Mar 24 '14 at 2:12
  • "Modern Perl", OTOH, the concept that we don't have to write perl the way we did a decade ago, I like very much. – ysth Mar 24 '14 at 5:35
  • Indeed, the idea and that particular module are different. Perl has the wart that we can't insist on a particular version, only that version or later (without tricky other modules and additional code, as I showed in Effective Perl Programming). – brian d foy Mar 24 '14 at 23:14

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