41

I am trying to get an IntStream out of an n dimensional int arrays. Is there a nice API way to do it? I know the concatenate method for two streams.

4
  • 2
    Would you add more details of the data you have, and how you want it delivered? Mar 24, 2014 at 4:22
  • I just have a two dimensional int array. I don't think the solution is data dependent? Mar 24, 2014 at 4:35
  • Do you want the IntStream to be iterating over each int in the int[][]? Mar 24, 2014 at 4:36
  • The Arrays class in Java 8 has a public static <T> Stream<T> stream(T[] array) method. I guess that would do the trick. But I think an IntStream would only work for n=1. Mar 24, 2014 at 5:15

4 Answers 4

55

Assuming you want to process array of array sequentially in row-major approach, this should work:

int[][] arr = { {1, 2, 3}, {4, 5, 6}, {7, 8, 9} };
IntStream stream = Arrays.stream(arr).flatMapToInt(x -> Arrays.stream(x));

First it invokes the Arrays.stream(T[]) method, where T is inferred as int[], to get a Stream<int[]>, and then Stream#flatMapToInt() method maps each int[] element to an IntStream using Arrays.stream(int[]) method.

3
  • @SotiriosDelimanolis So it does give an IntStream traversing the array like 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, ...?
    – Rohit Jain
    Mar 24, 2014 at 5:23
  • 1
    Yes. The Function given to flatMapToInt takes each element in the int[][], ie. a single int[], and constructs and returns a new IntStream for each. All of these are concatenated into one final IntStream which is returned. (Not exactly, but that's how you can think of it.) Mar 24, 2014 at 5:28
  • This whole functional thing is new to me :| Mar 24, 2014 at 5:32
18

To further expand on Rohit's answer, a method reference can be used to slightly shorten the amount of code required:

int[][] arr = { {1, 2, 3}, 
                {4, 5, 6},
                {7, 8, 9} };

IntStream stream = Arrays.stream(arr).flatMapToInt(Arrays::stream);
2

To process the elements only, use flatMap as in Rohit's answer.

To process the elements with their indices, you may use IntStream.range as follows.

import java.util.stream.IntStream;
import static java.util.stream.IntStream.range;

public class StackOverflowTest {
    public static void main(String... args) {
        int[][] arr = { { 1, 2, 3 }, { 4, 5, 6 }, { 7, 8, 9 } };
        // Map the two dimensional array with indices.
        final IntStream intStream = range(0, arr.length).flatMap(row -> range(0, arr[row].length).map(col -> {
            final int element = arr[row][col];
            // E.g. multiply elements in odd numbered rows and columns by two.
            return row % 2 == 1 || col % 2 == 1 ? element * 2 : element;
        }));
        // Prints "1 4 3 8 10 12 7 16 9 ".
        intStream.forEachOrdered(n -> System.out.print(n + " "));
    }
}
2

Adding to the previous answers, the method Arrays::stream returns a sequential stream (see: Oracle Javadoc). In some situations, a parallel stream might improve performance. To explicitly request a parallel stream, you first need to convert to a List via Arrays::asList, then call parallelStream() on the resulting List.

To calculate the sum of a two dimensional int array using a IntStream, you can use following code:

int[][] twoDimArray = { {1, 2, 3}, {4, 5, 6}, {7, 8, 9} };
IntStream intStream = Arrays.asList(twoDimArray)
    .parallelStream()               // "rows" in parallel
    .flatMapToInt(Arrays::stream);  // "columns" sequentially
int sum = intStream.sum();          // = 45

The Stream created for processing the outer layer (rows, first dimension) is now executing in parallel, while the Streams for the inner layer (columns, second dimension) are still sequential (using Arrays::stream mentioned above).

Depending on the size and structure of your array, you might see a performance increase by factor 4 (that's what I measured in my own tests) or none at all. If your calculations are time critical, it might be worth a try to use a parallel Stream.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.