116

As part of our build process we run a database update script as we deploy code to 4 different environments. Further, since the same query will get added to until we drop a release into production it has to be able to run multiple times on a given database. Like this:

IF NOT EXISTS (SELECT * FROM sys.tables WHERE object_id = OBJECT_ID(N'[Table]'))
BEGIN
  CREATE TABLE [Table]
  (...)
END

Currently I have a create schema statement in the deployment/build script. Where do I query for the existence of a schema?

1
  • 2
    Please consider changing the accepted answer. It's not possible that the answer you accepted actually worked for you as written. Sep 5 '14 at 0:53
188

Are you looking for sys.schemas?

IF NOT EXISTS (SELECT * FROM sys.schemas WHERE name = 'jim')
BEGIN
EXEC('CREATE SCHEMA jim')
END

Note that the CREATE SCHEMA must be run in its own batch (per the answer below)

7
  • 18
    this doesn't work in SQL 2008 because the CREATE SCHEMA needs to be the first statement in a batch, see the vfilby post for a workaround
    – sergiom
    Mar 30 '10 at 15:09
  • 4
    You could use 'Select 1 from sys.schemas' to improve the performance. Nov 26 '12 at 9:17
  • 4
    @vijaysylvester No, this is a myth. SQL Server optimizes away the column list so it doesn't matter what you put there. Completely ignored. Want proof? Put SELECT 1/0... Sep 4 '14 at 20:23
  • 1
    I've updated this answer to not be incorrect (i.e. to use the script from below stackoverflow.com/a/521271/2688)
    – bdukes
    Jan 30 '15 at 21:36
  • 1
    While * vs 1 vs 1/0 may not make any performance difference there is a case where it does make a difference. From a security standpoint, all 3 choices require you to have access to all columns while naming a specific column causes only columns actually named in the query to be checked. So 'select col-with-access...' succeeds while 'select 1 ...' won't if any column of any table in the query is denied.
    – bielawski
    May 13 '19 at 19:36
165

@bdukes is right on the money for determining if the schema exists, but the statement above won't work in SQL Server 2005. CREATE SCHEMA <name> needs to run in its own batch. A work around is to execute the CREATE SCHEMA statement in an exec.

Here is what I used in my build scripts:

IF NOT EXISTS (SELECT 1 FROM sys.schemas WHERE name = '<name>')
BEGIN
    -- The schema must be run in its own batch!
    EXEC( 'CREATE SCHEMA <name>' );
END
1
  • works like a charm! this even lets me put my print statements and everything.
    – Tony
    Jun 17 '14 at 16:35
3

This is old so I feel compelled to add: For SQL SERVER 2008+ These all work (for the select part), then use EXECUTE('CREATE SCHEMA <name>') to actually create it on negative results.

DECLARE @schemaName sysname = 'myfunschema';
-- shortest
If EXISTS (SELECT 1 WHERE SCHEMA_ID(@schemaName) IS NOT NULL)
PRINT 'YEA'
ELSE
PRINT 'NOPE'

SELECT DB_NAME() AS dbname WHERE SCHEMA_ID(@schemaName) IS NOT NULL -- nothing returned if not there

IF NOT EXISTS ( SELECT  top 1 *
                FROM    sys.schemas
                WHERE   name = @schemaName )
PRINT 'WOOPS MISSING'
ELSE
PRINT 'Has Schema'

SELECT SCHEMA_NAME(SCHEMA_ID(@schemaName)) AS SchemaName1 -- null if not there otherwise schema name returned

SELECT SCHEMA_ID(@schemaName) AS SchemaID1-- null if not there otherwise schema id returned


IF EXISTS (
    SELECT sd.SchemaExists 
    FROM (
        SELECT 
            CASE 
                WHEN SCHEMA_ID(@schemaName) IS NULL THEN 0
                WHEN SCHEMA_ID(@schemaName) IS NOT NULL THEN 1
                ELSE 0 
            END AS SchemaExists
    ) AS sd
    WHERE sd.SchemaExists = 1
)
BEGIN
    SELECT 'Got it';
END
ELSE
BEGIN
    SELECT 'Schema Missing';
END
2
  • 2
    IF schema_id ('MySchemaName') IS NULL works well, and seems a bit more convenient than the accepted answer.
    – BradC
    Oct 10 '19 at 15:58
  • Agree @BradC. For those, who gets exception: IF SCHEMA_ID('out') IS NULL EXEC('CREATE SCHEMA [out] AUTHORIZATION [out]');
    – Juozas
    Sep 16 '20 at 11:45
2

If the layout of components allows it, this works too.

IF EXISTS (SELECT 1 FROM sys.schemas WHERE name = 'myschema') SET NOEXEC ON 
go
CREATE SCHEMA myschema
GO 
SET NOEXEC OFF -- if any further processing is needed.
GO
1

Just to be extra "defensive", the following version generates a Type conversion error to account for the possibility (however unlikely) of > 1 matching Schema's similar to how validation code often intentionally Throw Exception's because I believe it's good to and I believe it's "'best practice'" to account for all possible return results however unlikely and even if it's just to generate a fatal exception because the known effects of stopping processing is usually better than unknown cascading effects of un-trapped errors. Because it's highly unlikely, I didn't think it's worth the trouble of a separate Count check + Throw or Try-Catch-Throw to generate a more user-friendly fatal error but still fatal error nonetheless.

SS 2005-:

declare @HasSchemaX bit
set @HasSchemaX = case (select count(1) from sys.schemas where lower(name) = lower('SchemaX')) when 1 then 1 when 0 then 0 else 'ERROR' end

SS 2008+:

declare @HasSchemaX bit = case (select count(1) from sys.schemas where lower(name) = lower('SchemaX')) when 1 then 1 when 0 then 0 else 'ERROR' end

Then:

if @HasSchemaX = 1
begin
   ...
end -- if @HasSchemaX = 1
4
  • I suppose it's possible to have more than one matching schema when you use a case sensitive collation, but your "error handling" will result in the following error: Conversion failed when converting the varchar value 'ERROR' to data type int.
    – user247702
    Oct 24 '17 at 13:46
  • @Stijn: That's "By Design" similar to how validation code often intentionally Throw Exception's. Like you said, it's not "'likely'" to happen, so IMHO, it wasn't worth a whole Try-Catch or separate Count check to generate a more user-friendly fatal error, but regardless, I would likely want a fatal error. I believe in and I believe it's "'best practice'" to account for all possible return results however unlikely and even if it's just to generate a fatal exception because the known effects of stopping processing is usually better than unknown cascading effects of un-trapped errors.
    – Tom
    Oct 25 '17 at 15:17
  • That all sounds fine, I wasn't sure whether it was intentional :) Your answer could benefit from some additional explanation, like you just gave in your comment.
    – user247702
    Oct 25 '17 at 15:21
  • @Stijn: My pet peeve is the common not-so "'best practice'" of not checking if a Select, Insert, Update or Delete Statement returned / affected more or less than the expected # of Rows however unlikely. Even if there is(are) Unique Index'es currently ensuring the expected # (i.e. 1) of Rows to be returned / affected, that could change (accidentally or (short-sightedly) "'intentionally'") in the future.
    – Tom
    Oct 25 '17 at 15:21

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