11

I am trying to write some multithreaded code to read from a DAQ device and render the captured signal at the same time:

std::atomic <bool> rendering (false);
auto render = [&rendering, &display, &signal] (void)
    {
        while (not rendering)
            {std::this_thread::yield ();};
        do {display.draw (signal);}
            while (display.rendering ()); // returns false when user quits
        rendering = false;
    };
auto capture = [&rendering, &daq] (void)
    {
        for (int i = daq.read_frequency (); i --> 0;)
            daq.record (); // fill the buffer before displaying the signal
        rendering = true;
        do {daq.record ();} 
            while (rendering);
        daq.stop ();
    };
std::thread rendering_thread (render);
std::thread capturing_thread (capture);

rendering_thread.join ();
capturing_thread.join ();

Sometimes this will work fine, but usually I get really bad stuttering. I had render () and capture () print a line upon each loop iteration, and then colored the lines such that red is from render () and blue is from capture ():

thread execution vs time

The left plot is from a smooth run, the right plot is from a run with stuttering.

I had roughly the equivalent program in C using openMP and the performance was always smooth:

int status = 0;
#pragma omp parallel num_threads(2) private(tid) shared(status)
/* READ AND DRAW */ {
 tid = omp_get_thread_num ();
 /* DRAW */ if (tid is 0) {
     int finished = 0;
     while (not finished) {
         #pragma omp critical
         /* GET JOB STATUS */ {
             finished = status;
         }
         finished = renderDisplay ();
     }
     #pragma omp critical
     /* TERMINATE DISPLAY */ {
         cvDestroyAllWindows();
     }
     #pragma omp atomic
     status ++;
     #pragma omp flush(status)
 }
 /* READ */ if (tid is 1) {
     int finished = 0;
     while (not finished) {
         #pragma omp critical
         /* GET JOB STATUS */ {
             finished = status;
         }
         captureSignal ();
     }
 }
 #pragma omp barrier
}

At least, both the C and C++11 versions look equivalent to me, but I can't figure out why the stuttering is happening in the C++11 version.

I can't post a SSCCE because the daq.* routines all depend on the NI DAQ library, but it may be worth noting that daq.record () blocks until the physical device is finished reading, and the NI DAQ lib itself spawns several threads when it starts.

I've tried implementing atomic flags in various configurations and changing function call orders and nothing seems to have an effect.

What is going on here, and how can I control it?

update: increasing the sampling rate of the DAQ alleviates the problem, which leads me to strongly suspect that this does have something to do with the fact that daq.record () is a blocking call.

12
  • 3
    Only a real-time OS give control on the flow of a program. Trying to control and predict the thread scheduling will fail if not on that kind of OS. – galop1n Mar 24 '14 at 12:29
  • 3
    Is it really necessary to have each thread blocking the other? One's a producer, one's a consumer. Should be pretty straight forward to make it lockless (which is basically what you're using the atomic for) – Brent Mar 26 '14 at 22:23
  • The atomic isn't a lock in this context, its a "start/stop" signal between the threads. The producer only blocks the consumer until it has produced enough data for the consumer to display something meaningful. After that the threads work independently until the consumer reports that the user wants to quit. – evenex_code Mar 26 '14 at 23:07
  • What do you expect i --> 0 to do? You realize it tests i for being > 0 and then decrements the value of i? – kfsone Mar 31 '14 at 0:51
  • while (not rendering) {std::this_thread::yield ();}; is kind of brutal and it seems more like you might want a spinlock here. Also, in the C++11 version you are explicitly adding the overhead of references to the atomic. – kfsone Mar 31 '14 at 0:59
1

As people in the comments have mentioned you don't have much control of the scheduling. What probably can help you even more is to turn away from spin locks and use conditions. This will force put the render thread into sleep if it went too fast and processed all the data the capture thread has produced. You can look at this example for 1 iteration. In your case every time more data becomes available from the capture thread, you need to call notify_one(). You can use the version of wait that takes only 1 parameter for your case.

So your code will become something like this

std::mutex mutex;
std::condition_variable condition;
std::atomic <bool> rendering (false);
auto render = [&rendering, &display, &signal] (void)
    {
        // this while loop is not needed anymore because
        // we will wait for a signal before doing any drawing
        while (not rendering)
            {std::this_thread::yield ();};
        // first we lock. destructor will unlock for us
        std::unique_lock<std::mutex> lock(mutex);
        do {
               // this will wait until we have been signaled
               condition.wait(lock);
               // maybe check display.rendering() and exit (depending on your req.)
               // process all data available
               display.draw (signal);
           } while (display.rendering ()); // returns false when user quits
        rendering = false;
    };
auto capture = [&rendering, &daq] (void)
    {
        for (int i = daq.read_frequency (); i --> 0;)
            daq.record (); // fill the buffer before displaying the signal
        rendering = true;
        condition.notify_one();
        // special note; you can call notify_one() here with
        // the mutex lock not acquired.
        do {daq.record (); condition.notify_one();} 
            while (rendering);
        daq.stop ();
        // signal one more time as the render thread could have
        // been in "wait()" call
        condition.notify_one();
    };
std::thread rendering_thread (render);
std::thread capturing_thread (capture);

rendering_thread.join ();
capturing_thread.join ();

Doing it this way will also consume less CPU resources, as the render thread will go to sleep when there is no data to process.

3
  • I'll try this when I get back to my work computer. I feel I should mention that the rendering thread actually reads the buffer, oblivious to the capturing thread's activities. (the display tears a bit but the routine is just for rough visual debugging). So from the time it starts, it always has data to process, because it draws the entire buffer until it gets the "stop" signal... I'm not sure if that changes anything (or is part of the problem). – evenex_code Mar 31 '14 at 3:43
  • You need some sort of synchronization between your threads. Using boolean is the worst possible way, since it does not help the scheduler to know what your code intend is. Use primitives used for synchronization, it'll both help the scheduler and the reader of your code. It's clearly more obvious when you have a "condition" in your code than a bool that the former depends on some other thread. – xryl669 May 13 '14 at 13:11
  • I think you are bikeshedding. – evenex_code May 13 '14 at 21:49

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