4

I am tasked to create a data structure that holds a boolean for every minute of the last 24hrs. (Did event X occur?) I need to keep the last 24hrs all the time. (That is, data will constantly be added, old data popped off.) The data is to be persisted to a flash drive. We are on an embedded platform, but memory isn't that limited (I have 128MB available), fragmentation might become a problem, though. This is a realtime system, but since the record is per minute, there's little runtime constraints.

The interface could look something like this:

class x_record {
  public:
    // record whether or not x occurred this minute
    void record_entry(bool x_occured);

    // how many minutes has x occured in the last 24hrs? 
    unsigned int x_occurance_minutes() const;

  private:
    // HERE BE DRAGONS 
};

What would be a good data structure to store the actual data in? My current favorites are std::deque<bool> and an array of 24 long long, with 60 of their 64 bits each used for the 60mins of an hour. The latter is the current favorite for persistence.

I think I have a pretty good idea about the pros and cons of both ideas, but would hope some of you could provide additional insides and maybe even more ideas.

P.S.: This is strictly C++03 + TR1 + Boost 1.52, no C++11/14 available.

22
  • 5
    Sounds like you need a ring buffer. Mar 24, 2014 at 14:51
  • 2
    @Frédéric It should be maintainable, fast, compact, beautiful, and well-behaved. If it brews good coffee, then that's a nice extra. :)
    – sbi
    Mar 24, 2014 at 14:53
  • 2
    @sbi My understanding is that you wouldn't need either one of them: you allocate a vector<bool>(24*60, false), and run with it. Internally, it would have the same footprint as an array of longs, plus two pointers. The chance of it fragmenting your heap would be pretty slim, too, because all allocations would happen in the same exact size of 180 bytes. Mar 24, 2014 at 14:59
  • 2
    An alternative is to use std::bitset. Mar 24, 2014 at 15:08
  • 8
    @Alec: Please do not change my code in such a controversial fashion. I do not believe protected data is a good design. In fact, I consider protected an evil that is sometimes necessary (like friend), but should be used as little as possible.
    – sbi
    Mar 24, 2014 at 15:09

7 Answers 7

9

To elaborate on the vector<bool> version, I think it's quite a good idea, since you always store the same amount of data (that's at least what I understood):

class x_record {
   vector<bool> data;
   unsigned int currentMinute;

public:
   x_record(): data(24*60, false), currentMinute(0){}

   // record whether or not x occurred this minute
   void record_entry(bool x_occured){
      data[currentMinute] = x_occured;
      currentMinute = (currentMinute+1)%data.size();
   }

};

This way, the vector size is constant so it shouldn't be fragmented (since it's allocated all at the same time). You can keep track of the current minute with the currentMinute variable. When you fill all the fields, you just set it to 0 with %(24*60) and overwrite the old data, since you don't need it.

You could also use a normal array instead of a vector<bool>, but that would require either more space (since normally C++ stores bool values the same way as a char), or some bit manipulation which is - in my opinion - reinventing the wheel, when we got the vector<bool> specialization.

4
  • I don't think this is a bad idea. +1 from me.
    – sbi
    Mar 24, 2014 at 15:28
  • +1 I would have given the same answer. Instead of hardcoding 24*60 in record_entry though, I would have just used data.size(). Also, the unsigned int x_occurance_minutes() const; method requested by the OP would be just return std::count( data.begin(), data.end(), true ); Mar 24, 2014 at 15:36
  • This is just an ordinary ring buffer and it is a bit tricky to look an event up, because you have to figure out where it is in the ring buffer, first the vector element, then the bit in question.
    – ypnos
    Mar 24, 2014 at 15:48
  • 1
    You could construct the data member with the correct size straight away, using data(24*60, false) in the initializer list. Mar 24, 2014 at 15:51
6

A circular buffer:

int countBits(std::uint32_t v) {
  // source: http://graphics.stanford.edu/~seander/bithacks.html#CountBitsSetParallel
  typedef std::uint32_t T;
  v = v - ((v >> 1) & (T)~(T)0/3);                           // temp
  v = (v & (T)~(T)0/15*3) + ((v >> 2) & (T)~(T)0/15*3);      // temp
  v = (v + (v >> 4)) & (T)~(T)0/255*15;                      // temp
  return (T)(v * ((T)~(T)0/255)) >> (sizeof(T) - 1) * CHAR_BIT; // count
}

class x_record {
  public:
    x_record() { std::memset(&history, 0, sizeof(history)); }

    // record whether or not x occurred this minute
    void record_entry(bool x_occured) {
      uint64_t mask = 1 << (bit % 32);
      uint64_t set = x_occured ? mask : 0;
      history[bit / 32] = (history[bit / 32] & ~mask) | set;

      bit = (bit + 1) % (24*60);
    }

    // how many minutes has x occured in the last 24hrs? 
    int x_occurance_minutes() const {
      int count = 0;
      for (int i=0; i<45; ++i) {
        count += countBits(history[i]);
      }
      return count;
    }

  private:
    std::uint32_t history[45];
    short bit = 0;
};
2
  • That's the bit hackery I thought I'd use long long for. Is there any advantage in using a 32bit integer over a 64bit one? (Oh, and +1, since this, too, answers the question.)
    – sbi
    Mar 24, 2014 at 16:00
  • @sbi 24 * 60 is evenly divisible by 32, so there's no extra space used. You could use uint64_t as well, but I found that this bit counting routine only works for types up to 32 bits. You'd have to update both countBits() and the constants used in x_record.
    – bames53
    Mar 24, 2014 at 16:13
3

I would have a std::vector<bool> for every hour and only ditch hourly. So you could have a std::deque<std::vector<bool> >. Likewise it could be a std::deque<long long> but I don't see a benefit as compared to the vector.

It makes things efficient, easy to understand and less error prone.

5
  • That is two vastly different ideas, presented only as skeletons, and pros and cons not addressed at all. Sorry, but that's a -1 from me.
    – sbi
    Mar 24, 2014 at 15:12
  • Why cant we statically allocate (see my answer)
    – Alec Teal
    Mar 24, 2014 at 15:14
  • @sbi Where do I present two vastly different ideas? I only see one idea in my answer, and that is to have one dequeue item per hour. It is basically a compromise between your two suggestions.
    – ypnos
    Mar 24, 2014 at 15:46
  • @ypnos: A vector<bool> allows accessing the booleans as (if they were) actual bool objects, while std::deque<long long> (note the spelling of the container, BTW) requires me to fiddle with the bits myself. Basically, that boils down to the two opposite suggestions I made in my question.
    – sbi
    Mar 24, 2014 at 16:50
  • Maybe you should word your question more carefully and I also think you didn't get the quintessence of my answer, the long long is only a sidenote.
    – ypnos
    Mar 25, 2014 at 10:18
3

As suggested in the comments, std::bitset might be a good choice. It's a fixed-size sequence of bits that can be manipulated independently. It takes less memory than a std::vector<bool> (even thought you said this is not a problem for you). You might however need to wrap it in another container if you need to make the sequence circular, so that you always keep the last 24*60 minutes, not the 24*60 minutes of a day.

2
  • I suggested boost.dynamic_bitset because I mistakenly thought that std::bitset had a maximum size (as suggested by the constructor and the to_ulong() function), but this is not the case and the number of bits is known at startup, so std::bitset is a better fit.
    – stefaanv
    Mar 27, 2014 at 12:14
  • In the end, I posted (and accepted) my own answer, since yours what a bit vague, but you certainly turned me into the right direction. Thanks!
    – sbi
    Apr 8, 2014 at 14:05
1

When you are only concerned on how often the event occurred in the last 24 hours, and can completely neglect the time when it occurred, you can simply record the occurences.

Consider the following (not tested):

class x_record {
public:
  // record whether or not x occurred this minute
  void record_entry(bool x_occured) {
    if (x_occured) {
      m_records.insert(getTime());
    }
  }

  // how many minutes has x occured in the last 24hrs? 
  unsigned int x_occurance_minutes() {
    clearRecords();
    return m_records.size();
  }

private:
    time_t getTime() const {
      return time(NULL) / 60; // Get Minute time stamp
    }

    void clearRecords() {
      // Erase all records that happend before the last 24 hours
      time_t frameStart = getTime() - 60*60*24;
      for (std::set<time_t>::iterator it = m_recods.begin(); it != m_records.end(); ++it) {
        if (*it < frameStart) {
          m_records.erase(it);
        } else {
          break;
        }
      }
    }

private:
    std::set<time_t> m_records;
};

This is suitable best if events occur sparsely.

It uses the constrain that sets store their elements in a strict weak ordering, so that elements with lower time stamp will be listed first. Also

You should consider a different key type for inserting into the set, as time_t is not guaranteed to represent seconds.

1
  • This is an interesting idea (+1). But the event can occur for up to several dozen minutes in 24hrs, it's not unlikely that it occurs several dozen times, and the timestamp on this platform is 64bit. Given these circumstances (which I believe I hadn't stated that clearly in my question), I guess using your idea would be inferior.
    – sbi
    Mar 24, 2014 at 15:55
1

I would suggest a class containing boost.dynamic_bitset, a counter for handling the storing of the new value and a conversion function for accessing via hour/minute.

The dynamic_set handles most of the requirements:

  • boost, no C++11
  • compact
  • handles 24*60 bits
  • has a count() function for counting set bits
  • returns blocks for storing as bits
  • doesn't have the "container" issues of std::vector
3
  • Sounds interesting (+1). How would I push to/pop from such a beast?
    – sbi
    Mar 24, 2014 at 18:23
  • Just increment and modulo the counter and use it to index the next bit. After the first iteration, the oldest value will be overwritten. BTW, boost also has circular buffer, but not optimized for bits...
    – stefaanv
    Mar 24, 2014 at 20:57
  • Actually, that part is the same as for the vector<bool> solution.
    – stefaanv
    Mar 24, 2014 at 21:02
1

As was suggested by Marius Bancila first in a comment and then in an answer (please go and upvote that answer, he gave the hint that turned out to be the solution), std::bitset<> is ideal for this. However, since his answer is rather vague, I decided to post a more concrete description of what I ended up using:

class x_record {
  public:
    void record_entry(bool x_occured) {
      record_ <<= 1;
      record_[0] = x_occurred;
    }

    unsigned int x_occurance_minutes() const {
      return record_.count();
    }

    void write_to(std::ostream& os) const {
      os << m_overload_minutes.to_string();
    }

    void read_from(std::istream& is) const {
      std::string bits;
      is >> std::setw(minutes_to_keep) >> bits;
      if( !is || bits.size()!=minutes_to_keep )
        throw std::runtime_error("invalid file format");

      record_ = std::bitset<60*24>(bits);
    }

  private:
    std::bitset<60*24>  record_;
};

As you can see, std::bitset<> is pretty much exactly what I needed. Also, persisting the data is very easy.

Of course, in reality, this was a bit more complex1, but in principle this is indeed the whole thing.

Thanks to everyone for trying to help me!

1 It turned out that it was easier to call x_occurance_minutes() every few msecs, for which record_.count() seemed quite some overhead, so I called it in record_entry() (called once per minute only) instead and cached the result.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.