38

I have a List<bool> with lots of values. What is the most efficient way to check if every single item in the list equals false?

0
43

You can use Enumerable.Any it will find satisfy the condition on first match. As Habib rightly said better to use Any as Enumerable.All would return true for an Empty list of bool.

!lst.Any(c=> c == true);

OR use Enumerable.All

lst.All(c=> c == false);
11
  • 6
    +1, Better to use Any, since Enumerable.All would return true for an Empty list of bool.
    – Habib
    Mar 24 '14 at 19:06
  • +1 This performs better than All(), because it does always iterates the whole list; it stops when it find one Mar 24 '14 at 19:06
  • 1
    @AdrianCarneiro Uhm ..? That is not making sense to me. Both are lazy and require looking at the same number of elements in this case. Mar 24 '14 at 19:07
  • 1
    @user2864740, negated is just a short way of providing Any with the bool value, Consider the following code: List<bool> list = new List<bool>(); var b1 = list.All(r => r == false); var b2 = list.Any(r => r == false); , now b1 would be true and b2 would be false. It is just that Enumerable.All behaves differently on an empty list.
    – Habib
    Mar 24 '14 at 19:14
  • 1
    obviously the list contains some items.and these two statement are not the same.First return true if there is any item that equals to true Second return true if all item's equals to false.You need a negation operator on first statement. Mar 24 '14 at 19:20
29

A significantly faster solution, not mentioned here, is using Contains

if (!myList.Contains(true))
    // Great success - all values false! 

I have compared Contains against IEnumerable.Any and Contains returns faster. In my tests IEnumerable.All performed the same as IEnumerable.Any, perhaps a similar algorithm is used for both these functions under the hood. I also checked IEnumerable.Exists which performed better than IEnumerable.Any and IEnumerable.All, but was still slower than Contains.

Of a list of 10,000,000 bool entries (I also tried 0 and 1 entries, with similar results), I came up with the following metrics:

Elapsed via Any = 95ms

Elapsed via All = 88ms

Elapsed via Exists = 27ms

Elapsed via Contains = 17ms

Contains is ~5.59x faster than Any!

Tested with the following code:

// setup initial vars
var myList = new List<bool>();
for (int x = 0; x < 10000000; x++)
    myList.Add(false);  

var containsAllFalse = false;
Stopwatch sw = new Stopwatch();

// start test
sw.Start();
containsAllFalse = !myList.Any(x => x);
sw.Stop();

// get result for Any
var timeAny = sw.ElapsedMilliseconds;

// reset variable state (just in case it affects anything)
containsAllFalse = false;   

// start test 2
sw.Restart();
containsAllFalse = myList.All(x => x == false);
sw.Stop();

// get result for All
var timeAll = sw.ElapsedMilliseconds;

// reset variable state (just in case it affects anything)
containsAllFalse = false;   

// start test 3
sw.Restart();
containsAllFalse = !myList.Exists(x => x == true);
sw.Stop();

// get result for All
var timeExists = sw.ElapsedMilliseconds;

// reset variable state (just in case it affects anything)
containsAllFalse = false;   

// start test 4
sw.Restart();   
containsAllFalse = !myList.Contains(true);          
sw.Stop();

// get result from Contains
var timeContains = sw.ElapsedMilliseconds;

// print results
var percentFaster = Math.Round((double)timeAny / timeContains, 2);
Console.WriteLine("Elapsed via Any = {0}ms", timeAny);
Console.WriteLine("Elapsed via All = {0}ms", timeAll);
Console.WriteLine("Elapsed via Exists = {0}ms", timeExists);
Console.WriteLine("Elapsed via Contains = {0}ms", timeContains);
Console.WriteLine("Contains is ~{0}x faster than Any!", percentFaster);


Note this will only work with types where type can only have two states (i.e. it won't work variables of >2 states, such as Nullable<bool>)

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  • 1
    Nice performance comparison. Where there are many solutions performance takes priority.
    – WKara
    Jul 31 '18 at 7:54
  • Is there a way to perform this if the list isnt a bool but of a class that contains a boolean value ?
    – RyanN1220
    Feb 21 '19 at 13:01
  • 1
    "..as it can return early at the first occurrence of true.." so can (and do) both All and Any. While Contains may be faster, it is not faster due to early termination. Check the implementation of in the .NET Reference Source's IEnumerable.All which, as I would expect, is lazy and does not force evaluation of the entire sequence. Feb 21 '19 at 16:37
  • @user2864740 great point - thank you! I'll edit the OP to reflect this. Feb 22 '19 at 2:21
18

I agree with the use of IEnumerable.Any/All. However, I disagree with the currently most-voted answer (which was wrong at the time of writing this) and several of the associated comments of Any vs All.

These following operations are equivalent semantically. Note that the negations are applied both inside, on the predicate, and on the result of the operation.

!l.Any(x => f(x))
l.All(x => !f(x))

Now, in this case we are thus looking for:

If it is not the case that there is any true value.

!l.Any(x => x)  // f(x) = x == true

Or,

It is the case that every value is not true.

l.All(x => !x)  // f'(x) = !f(x) = !(x == true)

There is nothing special for empty lists the result is the same: e.g. !empty.Any(..) is false, as is empty.All(..) and the above equivalence relation remains valid.

In addition, both forms are lazily evaluated and require the same number of evaluations in LINQ To Objects; internally the difference, for a sequence implementation, is merely negating the check on the predicate and the result value.

2
  • Is there a way to perform this if the list isnt a bool but of a class that contains a boolean value ?
    – RyanN1220
    Feb 21 '19 at 12:07
  • @RyanN1220 Yes. LINQ's IEnumerable is flexible in this aspect as a function is accepted in many contexts (there are restrictions for certain providers such a LINQ-to-EF, eg.). The All/Any functions take an optional Func<T, bool>. In the above, f(x) is a "some code" (and/or a function) that accepts x and return a bool. Eg., given var a = new [] { Tuple.Create(1, true), Tuple.Create(1, false) }, then a.Any(x => x.Item2) is true and a.All(x => x.Item2) is false. Feb 21 '19 at 16:32
3

You can use LINQ's All method:

list.All(x => x == false);

This will return false immediately if it finds a value that equals to true.

2
  • Is there a way to perform this if the list isnt a bool but of a class that contains a boolean value ?
    – RyanN1220
    Feb 21 '19 at 13:01
  • 1
    @RyanN1220 the lambda variable "x" represents the object here. so all you need is to change the condition x.SomeBoolProperty == false or !x.SomeBoolProperty Feb 21 '19 at 13:03

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