1

I found a few links regarding rolling back a SQL Server query but have had problems implementing it. Since the information I am inserting and updating needs to always be correct I need to make sure this is working beforehand. Now, I already have a try/catch block, and I know the rollback goes into the catch block. For example, this is my code:

using (SqlConnection conn5 = new SqlConnection(connString)) 
{
    try 
    {
        string query = "INSERT QUERY";
        SqlCommand cmd = new SqlCommand(query, conn5);
        // PARAMETERS

        conn5.open();
        cmd.ExecuteNonQuery();
    }
    catch 
    { 
        cmd.Rollback();
    }
}

I tried cmd.RollBack() but it just blew in my face.

  • 1
    have a look at transaction scope. – Daniel A. White Mar 24 '14 at 20:21
  • 2
    You need to start a transaction, before attempting a COMMIT. – abhi Mar 24 '14 at 20:22
  • 1
    @abhi: Or a rollback. – Robert Harvey Mar 24 '14 at 20:22
  • 4
    MSDN has a nice example showing how to begin a transaction and control it: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/86773566(v=vs.110).aspx – Cᴏʀʏ Mar 24 '14 at 20:23
  • Oh! Transaction. I was missing that term (although i saw it everywhere). Will read into MSDN. Will check, thanks :) – Lord Relix Mar 24 '14 at 20:24
5

You open a transaction scope. It will automatically perform a rollback unless the Complete() method is called.

using (var tScope = new TransactionScope())
using (SqlConnection conn5 = new SqlConnection(connString)) 
{
  string query = "INSERT QUERY";
  SqlCommand cmd = new SqlCommand(query, conn5);
  PARAMETERS

  conn5.open();
  cmd.ExecuteNonQuery();

  // If an exception is thrown, the call to Complete() will never be reached and the
  // changes will be rolled back.
  tScope.Complete();
}
  • 2
    TransactionScope is the answer, but not like this. Mandatory read using new TransactionScope() Considered Harmful – Remus Rusanu Mar 24 '14 at 20:48
  • I don't agree. I think that Serializable is a resonable default, as it is fool proof. Lower isolation levels requires understanding of drawbacks. The timeout issue is not a problem for small apps. – Anders Abel Mar 24 '14 at 20:51
  • Is it far from fool proof. It causes far more problems that is solves. Blocking, deadlocks. If SERIALIZABLE would be a decent default, the engine would default to it. It does not, it defaults to READ COMMITTED, and for good reason. Even if you don't agree with that, there is still the issue of unadvertised change of implicit behavior (principle of least astonishment) and that alone should be enough of a warning. – Remus Rusanu Mar 24 '14 at 20:58
  • Tried the tScope approach you posted Anders and received some errors, but seems to be settings related. For example: Attempted to access an unloaded appdomain. (Exception from HRESULT: 0x80131014) was one of them. Will see if this approach works, but taking into cosnideration Remus's reply. Thanks! – Lord Relix Mar 24 '14 at 21:11
  • This worked. Thanks Anders. I am still having an issue with a part of my logic and this but I will get to work around it. Thanks a lot, this is vastly simpler and works. Thanks Remus for the artcile :) – Lord Relix Mar 25 '14 at 14:14

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