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I'm trying to launch PHP site with apache on fedora and I have a problem about writting permissions. It looks like apache does not have write permissions to some folders, but I canno understand why.

I've checked httpd.conf and it has group: apache, user: apache. I then made: chown -R apache:apache www and set 777 permissions to the folders, but it still says:

Warning: file_put_contents(/var/www/public/temp.txt) [function.file-put-contents]: failed to open stream: Permission denied in /var/www/public/newtest.php on line 8

Please advice.

UPDATE: Btw, if I make "php newtest.php" from command line, the file temp.txt is created with group root and user root. It just doest not work from the browser.

  • 1
    What about the permission of the file temp.txt? – Felix Kling Feb 14 '10 at 19:03
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    temp.txt is a new file which I want to be created, it does not exist yet – Pavel Dubinin Feb 14 '10 at 19:35
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Warning: file_put_contents(/var/www/public/temp.txt) [function.file-put-contents]: failed to open stream: Permission denied in /var/www/public/newtest.php on line 8

There is so much bad stuff here.

Lets start with the fact that you really want to keep httpd writeable files well away from your code - certainly in a seperate directory, preferably outside the document root altogether.

chown -R apache:apache www and set 777 permissions to the folders

And did you check afterwards what the permissions actually were? BTW see also the point above - if you've made your entire website writeable by the everybody then you're just asking for trouble. You certainly chouldn't change BOTH the owner AND the permissions.

Have you got SELinux enabled? (run sestatus as root). If so then you either need to disable it or learn how to configure it - but I'd recommend you get to grips with old-fashioned permissions first, then disable SELinux.

C.

  • Ok, I know that 777 is not the way to store files, but in order to solve the problem I had to try everything. I've disabled SELinux now. sestatus root now shows "SELinux status: disabled", but the problem is still there :( Any ideas? – Pavel Dubinin Feb 15 '10 at 19:56
  • Ah no, actually it helped, just had the old file with root permissions here. thanks alot – Pavel Dubinin Feb 15 '10 at 20:08
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make chmod 775 to newtest.php ;)

  • As I already mentioned, I made 777 to the entire folder (including newtest.php of course). temp.txt is a new file which I want to be created, it does not exist yet. – Pavel Dubinin Feb 14 '10 at 19:34
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ls -la /var/www/public

Just to check :-)

  • Ok, the folder itself has this: drwxrwxrwx 8 apache apache 4096 2010-02-13 04:08 public The file I'm executing: -rwxrwxrwx 1 apache apache 213 2010-02-14 06:34 newtest.php – Pavel Dubinin Feb 14 '10 at 20:42
  • Weird. Are you sure that temp.txt is not already there? Also, what will happen if you try "sudo -u apache echo test > /var/www/public/temp.txt" ? – Qwerty Feb 14 '10 at 20:56
  • yes, it was not there. When I launced the command you suggested (under root), it have created it, but when I try my PHP script again, it still shows the same error even though the file is there. I'm certain it has something to do with apache permissions, but not sure what exactly.. – Pavel Dubinin Feb 14 '10 at 21:11
  • Hmm. Other reasons could be safe_mode or open_basedir options enabled in php.ini or in apache config or in .htaccess. But I think they should produce slightly different warnings. – Qwerty Feb 14 '10 at 21:24
  • no.. this is not the case. both are off. – Pavel Dubinin Feb 14 '10 at 21:48
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I'd recommend switching apache to mod_itk as mpm and running the particular vhost with permissions of the owner document root directory and contained php scripts.

  • how should this help with my issue? I don't really need vhost here.. – Pavel Dubinin Feb 14 '10 at 22:25
  • In Apache there is at least a default vhost configured usually. You probably want to try to set the vhost owner there. But you probably also want to improve your question because mod_itk is overkill in single vhost setups and I would not have suggested it then. ;-) – hurikhan77 Feb 14 '10 at 22:27

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