73

I'm looking to create a hash with sha256 using openssl and C++. I know there's a similar post at Generate SHA hash in C++ using OpenSSL library, but I'm looking to specifically create sha256.

UPDATE:

Seems to be a problem with the include paths. It can't find any OpenSSL functions even though I included

#include "openssl/sha.h"

and I included the paths in my build

-I/opt/ssl/include/ -L/opt/ssl/lib/ -lcrypto 
6
  • Also as a bonus, it would be nice if it would output the hash in binary :)
    – stan
    Feb 14, 2010 at 19:29
  • 1
    I posted a new answer there which explains what you want. You could close this question as duplicate if that answer helps.
    – AndiDog
    Feb 14, 2010 at 20:01
  • @AndiDog - Everything seems to work right, except the compiler cannot find the functions. It could not even find a reference to SHA1. Also coudln't find any of the SHA256 functions like `SHA256_Final'. Not sure what I'm doing wrong, I included #include "openssl/sha.h" and I included the include and library during the compilation -I/opt/ssl/include/ -L/opt/ssl/lib/ -lcrypto
    – stan
    Feb 14, 2010 at 20:26
  • As you can see in the header (google.com/codesearch/p?hl=en#2CnO_mGaYOA/source/…), the SHA256 functions are only defined if OpenSSL is compiled with it. So check the value of OPENSSL_NO_SHA256 to see what's wrong. The -lcrypto parameter should be correct.
    – AndiDog
    Feb 14, 2010 at 21:07
  • It also doesn't work with any sha1 functions either :/
    – stan
    Feb 14, 2010 at 21:35

8 Answers 8

79

Here's how I did it:

void sha256_hash_string (unsigned char hash[SHA256_DIGEST_LENGTH], char outputBuffer[65])
{
    int i = 0;

    for(i = 0; i < SHA256_DIGEST_LENGTH; i++)
    {
        sprintf(outputBuffer + (i * 2), "%02x", hash[i]);
    }

    outputBuffer[64] = 0;
}


void sha256_string(char *string, char outputBuffer[65])
{
    unsigned char hash[SHA256_DIGEST_LENGTH];
    SHA256_CTX sha256;
    SHA256_Init(&sha256);
    SHA256_Update(&sha256, string, strlen(string));
    SHA256_Final(hash, &sha256);
    int i = 0;
    for(i = 0; i < SHA256_DIGEST_LENGTH; i++)
    {
        sprintf(outputBuffer + (i * 2), "%02x", hash[i]);
    }
    outputBuffer[64] = 0;
}

int sha256_file(char *path, char outputBuffer[65])
{
    FILE *file = fopen(path, "rb");
    if(!file) return -534;

    unsigned char hash[SHA256_DIGEST_LENGTH];
    SHA256_CTX sha256;
    SHA256_Init(&sha256);
    const int bufSize = 32768;
    unsigned char *buffer = malloc(bufSize);
    int bytesRead = 0;
    if(!buffer) return ENOMEM;
    while((bytesRead = fread(buffer, 1, bufSize, file)))
    {
        SHA256_Update(&sha256, buffer, bytesRead);
    }
    SHA256_Final(hash, &sha256);

    sha256_hash_string(hash, outputBuffer);
    fclose(file);
    free(buffer);
    return 0;
}

It's called like this:

static unsigned char buffer[65];
sha256("string", buffer);
printf("%s\n", buffer);
9
  • 1
    Hi, for everyone using the great QT :) - You can also use this, just add to your project file LIBS +=-lcrypto and then you can just convert the code to a class and everything will work fine ;)
    – TCB13
    Aug 29, 2011 at 23:58
  • 3
    -1: “SHA1_Init(), SHA1_Update() and SHA1_Final() return 1 for success, 0 otherwise.”, openssl.org/docs/crypto/sha.htm.
    – jww
    Jan 4, 2012 at 19:19
  • 1
    @Konrad Rudolph Its the same API interface, and the OpenSSL man pages lead back to the SHA1 stuff. Ignoring return values in high integrity software is very bad karma.
    – jww
    Mar 26, 2013 at 3:26
  • 14
    What the heck is sha256_hash_string(...) looks like you reference a non-existent function in your code...
    – UpAndAdam
    Aug 26, 2014 at 19:43
  • 3
    May I ask how to solve the 'byte' in second function was not declared
    – user2675516
    Aug 15, 2017 at 8:17
69

std based

#include <iostream>
#include <iomanip>
#include <sstream>
#include <string>

using namespace std;

#include <openssl/sha.h>
string sha256(const string str)
{
    unsigned char hash[SHA256_DIGEST_LENGTH];
    SHA256_CTX sha256;
    SHA256_Init(&sha256);
    SHA256_Update(&sha256, str.c_str(), str.size());
    SHA256_Final(hash, &sha256);
    stringstream ss;
    for(int i = 0; i < SHA256_DIGEST_LENGTH; i++)
    {
        ss << hex << setw(2) << setfill('0') << (int)hash[i];
    }
    return ss.str();
}

int main() {
    cout << sha256("1234567890_1") << endl;
    cout << sha256("1234567890_2") << endl;
    cout << sha256("1234567890_3") << endl;
    cout << sha256("1234567890_4") << endl;
    return 0;
}
9
  • 10
    Haven't tested this out, but this definitely looks cleaner than all the other "C++" versions.
    – stan
    May 23, 2012 at 4:58
  • 4
    This code compiles and produced the expected output. On ubuntu, you can use: sudo apt-get install libssl-dev && g++ -lcrypto main.cc to compile it.
    – Homer6
    Jan 12, 2013 at 4:03
  • 1
    This solution is actually better than the accepted one, as ostringstream is much, much safer than messing with arrays and sprintf.
    – omni
    Jul 19, 2016 at 22:26
  • 7
    According to the OpenSSL docs, "The EVP interface to message digests should almost always be used in preference to the low level interfaces. This is because the code then becomes transparent to the digest used and much more flexible." So keep that in mind when deciding to use this code, i.e. make sure you're positive that you'll only ever use SHA256. Otherwise, it's more worth your time to learn the EVP interface.
    – villapx
    Oct 20, 2016 at 12:36
  • 3
    @Homer6 for g++, technically the dependency should be after the src file that depends on it (caused complication issues for me on Ubuntu 16.04.1). Should be: g++ main.cc -lcrypto Jan 4, 2017 at 18:39
33

Using OpenSSL's EVP interface (the following is for OpenSSL 1.1):

#include <iomanip>
#include <iostream>
#include <sstream>
#include <string>
#include <openssl/evp.h>

bool computeHash(const std::string& unhashed, std::string& hashed)
{
    bool success = false;

    EVP_MD_CTX* context = EVP_MD_CTX_new();

    if(context != NULL)
    {
        if(EVP_DigestInit_ex(context, EVP_sha256(), NULL))
        {
            if(EVP_DigestUpdate(context, unhashed.c_str(), unhashed.length()))
            {
                unsigned char hash[EVP_MAX_MD_SIZE];
                unsigned int lengthOfHash = 0;

                if(EVP_DigestFinal_ex(context, hash, &lengthOfHash))
                {
                    std::stringstream ss;
                    for(unsigned int i = 0; i < lengthOfHash; ++i)
                    {
                        ss << std::hex << std::setw(2) << std::setfill('0') << (int)hash[i];
                    }

                    hashed = ss.str();
                    success = true;
                }
            }
        }

        EVP_MD_CTX_free(context);
    }

    return success;
}

int main(int, char**)
{
    std::string pw1 = "password1", pw1hashed;
    std::string pw2 = "password2", pw2hashed;
    std::string pw3 = "password3", pw3hashed;
    std::string pw4 = "password4", pw4hashed;

    hashPassword(pw1, pw1hashed);
    hashPassword(pw2, pw2hashed);
    hashPassword(pw3, pw3hashed);
    hashPassword(pw4, pw4hashed);

    std::cout << pw1hashed << std::endl;
    std::cout << pw2hashed << std::endl;
    std::cout << pw3hashed << std::endl;
    std::cout << pw4hashed << std::endl;

    return 0;
}

The advantage of this higher level interface is that you simply need to swap out the EVP_sha256() call with another digest's function, e.g. EVP_sha512(), to use a different digest. So it adds some flexibility.

3
  • 2
    if statements without else clauses ... so ... deep ... cannot see light ... Upvoted nonetheless because it uses the recommended EVP interface! May 13, 2019 at 14:03
  • 2
    @LimitedAtonement Indeed, I left "proper" error checking as an exercise to the end developer :) but at a minimum, I made sure I did all the if-checks just to highlight where they're required. Thanks for the +1!
    – villapx
    May 13, 2019 at 14:27
  • 2
    for anybody else coming here: EVP_MD_CTX could be a unique ptr with custom deleter . much cleaner code. just to nitpick here. std::unique_ptr<EVP_MD_CTX, std::function<void(EVP_MD_CTX*)>> mdCtx(EVP_MD_CTX_new(), [](EVP_MD_CTX* g) { EVP_MD_CTX_free(g); });
    – Csuszmusz
    Jan 25, 2022 at 19:04
1

A more "C++"ish version

#include <iostream>
#include <sstream>

#include "openssl/sha.h"

using namespace std;

string to_hex(unsigned char s) {
    stringstream ss;
    ss << hex << (int) s;
    return ss.str();
}   

string sha256(string line) {    
    unsigned char hash[SHA256_DIGEST_LENGTH];
    SHA256_CTX sha256;
    SHA256_Init(&sha256);
    SHA256_Update(&sha256, line.c_str(), line.length());
    SHA256_Final(hash, &sha256);

    string output = "";    
    for(int i = 0; i < SHA256_DIGEST_LENGTH; i++) {
        output += to_hex(hash[i]);
    }
    return output;
}

int main() {
    cout << sha256("hello, world") << endl;

    return 0;
}
6
  • 1
    -1: “SHA1_Init(), SHA1_Update() and SHA1_Final() return 1 for success, 0 otherwise.”, openssl.org/docs/crypto/sha.htm.
    – jww
    Jan 4, 2012 at 19:22
  • 3
    didn't want to obscure the code with C-style return value checks. DIY if you care
    – Max
    Feb 8, 2012 at 22:24
  • 16
    "DIY if you care" - sorry to inconvenience you. Folks will blindly copy/paste it. Ignoring return values is a dangerous practice, and should not be demonstarated (especially in high integrity code).
    – jww
    Feb 14, 2012 at 23:58
  • 2
    @jww I cried reading your comment because it's true, people will write "secure" applications by copy-and-paste programming. But I also agree to some degree with Max only because it shouldn't be on our shoulders to prevent stupid people from incorrectly using our knowledge, or stupid people from using "secure" software written by a copy and paste programmer.
    – user562566
    Mar 10, 2015 at 20:12
  • 1
    "DIY if you care" But seriously now, who cares about error conditions? Feb 10, 2020 at 2:11
1

Here's the function I personally use - I simply derived it from the function I used for sha-1 hashing:

char *str2sha256( const char *str, int length ) {
  int n;
  SHA256_CTX c;
  unsigned char digest[ SHA256_DIGEST_LENGTH ];
  char *out = (char*) malloc( 33 );

  SHA256_Init( &c );

  while ( length > 0 ) {
    if ( length > 512 ) SHA256_Update( &c, str, 512 );
    else SHA256_Update( &c, str, length );

    length -= 512;
    str += 512;
  }

  SHA256_Final ( digest, &c );

  for ( n = 0; n < SHA256_DIGEST_LENGTH; ++n )
    snprintf( &( out[ n*2 ] ), 16*2, "%02x", (unsigned int) digest[ n ] );

  return out;
}
0

If you want to compute the sha256 hash of a file...

auto sha256 = [](std::string fname, 
                 std::vector<unsigned char>& hash) -> bool {
   std::unique_ptr<EVP_MD_CTX, void (*)(EVP_MD_CTX *)>
            evpCtx(EVP_MD_CTX_new(), EVP_MD_CTX_free);
   EVP_DigestInit_ex(evpCtx.get(), EVP_sha256(), nullptr);

   constexpr size_t buffer_size { 1 << 12 };
   std::vector<char> buffer(buffer_size,'\0');

   std::ifstream fp(fname, std::ios::binary);
   if (!fp.is_open()) {
        std::cerr << "Unable to open '" << fname << "'!\n";
        return false;
   }
   while (fp.good()) {
        fp.read(buffer.data(), buffer_size);
        EVP_DigestUpdate (evpCtx.get(), buffer.data(), fp.gcount());
   }
   fp.close();

   hash.resize(SHA256_DIGEST_LENGTH);
   std::fill(hash.begin(), hash.end(), 0);
   unsigned int len;
   EVP_DigestFinal_ex (evpCtx.get(), hash.data(), &len);

   return true;
};

...

std::vector<unsigned char> hash;
sha256("/etc/profile", hash);
std::stringstream out;
for (size_t i = 0; i < hash.size(); i++)
    out << std::setfill('0') << std::setw(2) 
        << std::hex << int(hash[i]);
std::string hashStr = out.str();
std::cout << hashStr << std::endl;
...
a3fe9f414586c0d3cacbe3b6920a09d8718e503bca22e23fef882203bf765065
0

With the OpenSSL update to 3.0 most of the solution won't work (as the APIs deprecated) and it's recommended to use the EVP functions. Below code shows my take with EVP based on OpenSSL's official documentation

This implementation uses pure C and verified on Ubuntu 22.04

/**
 * Simple program to calculate message digest using openssl'l new EVP method
 *
 * Verified on Ubuntu 22.04 on Jan 29, 2023
 *
 * Install dependency:
 * sudo apt install make gcc libssl-dev -y
 *
 * To compile:
 * gcc sha256sum.c -o shasum.out -lcrypto
 *
 * To cross verify:
 * echo -n "Hello world" | sha256sum
 *
 * Author: Daniel Selvan D. <danilselvan@gmail.com>
 */

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>

#include <openssl/evp.h>

// OpenSSL engine implementation
#define OPENSSL_ENGINE NULL

/**
 * Returns the SHA256 value of the input string
 *
 * @param string input string for which the hash to be calculated
 * @returns string (32 bytes) - SHA256 hash
 */
static const unsigned char *getShaSum(const unsigned char *string)
{
    EVP_MD_CTX *mdCtx = EVP_MD_CTX_new();
    unsigned char mdVal[EVP_MAX_MD_SIZE], *md;
    unsigned int mdLen, i;

    if (!EVP_DigestInit_ex(mdCtx, EVP_sha256(), OPENSSL_ENGINE))
    {
        printf("Message digest initialization failed.\n");
        EVP_MD_CTX_free(mdCtx);
        exit(EXIT_FAILURE);
    }

    // Hashes cnt bytes of data at d into the digest context mdCtx
    if (!EVP_DigestUpdate(mdCtx, string, strlen((const char *)string)))
    {
        printf("Message digest update failed.\n");
        EVP_MD_CTX_free(mdCtx);
        exit(EXIT_FAILURE);
    }

    if (!EVP_DigestFinal_ex(mdCtx, mdVal, &mdLen))
    {
        printf("Message digest finalization failed.\n");
        EVP_MD_CTX_free(mdCtx);
        exit(EXIT_FAILURE);
    }
    EVP_MD_CTX_free(mdCtx);

    printf("DEBUG: Digest is: ");
    for (i = 0; i < mdLen; i++)
        printf("%02x", mdVal[i]);
    printf("\n");

    md = mdVal;

    return md;
}

int main()
{
    // To calculate the hash of a file, read it and pass the pointer
    getShaSum("Hello world");

    exit(EXIT_SUCCESS);
}

The advantage of this higher level interface is that you simply need to swap out the EVP_sha256() call with another digest's function, e.g. EVP_sha512(), to use a different digest.

-1

I think that you only have to replace SHA1 function with SHA256 function with tatk code from link in Your post

0

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.