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Consider the following training data sets..

+-------+-------+----------+-------------+
| Size  | Color | Shape    | Class/Label |
+=======+=======+==========+=============+
| big   | red   | circle   | No          |
| small | red   | triangle | No          |
| small | red   | circle   | Yes         |
| big   | blue  | circle   | No          |
| small | blue  | circle   | Yes         |
+-------+-------+----------+-------------+

I would like to understand how the algorithm proceeds when it starts with a negative example and when two negative examples come together.

This is not an assignment question by the way.

Examples with other data sets are also welcome! This is to understand the negative part of the algorithm.

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  • the training set contains 3 attributes and the last one is the classification data whether +ve or -ve. Can you explain how the G,S sets expand as each training data is considered?? @YvesDaoust
    – Ravi
    Mar 25, 2014 at 9:12
  • 2
    @SeanOwen There actually is something special about "Yes" and "No". A "Yes" label results in a generalization of the Specific hypotheses, wheres "No" results in a specialization of the General hypotheses.
    – bogatron
    Mar 25, 2014 at 16:14
  • 1
    @bogatron can you explain how the minimal specialization is <?, ?, triangle> and not <?,?,circle> ? Oct 22, 2017 at 18:53
  • 1
    G1 = {<small, ? , ?>, <?, blue, ?>, <?, ?, triangle>} why not G1 = {<big, ? , ?>, <?, red, ?>, <?, ?, triangle>} Oct 23, 2017 at 17:27
  • 1
    @Tim, the "G" hypotheses are the most general hypotheses. <?, blue, ?> is in G1 because blue objects (of any shape or size) are still in the hypothesis space (they weren't ruled out by the negative example).
    – bogatron
    Mar 16, 2020 at 21:28

1 Answer 1

63

For your hypothesis space (H), you start with your sets of maximally general (G) and maximally specific (S) hypotheses:

G0 = {<?, ?, ?>}
S0 = {<0, 0, 0>}

When you are presented with a negative example, you need to remove from S any hypothesis inconsistent with the current observation and replace any inconsistent hypothesis in G with its minimal specializations that are consistent with the observation but still more general than some member of S.

So for your first (negative) example, (big, red, circle), the minimal specializations would make the new hypothesis space

G1 = {<small, ? , ?>, <?, blue, ?>, <?, ?, triangle>}
S1 = S0 = {<0, 0, 0>}

Note that S did not change. For your next example, (small, red, triangle), which is also negative, you will need to further specialize G. Note that the second hypothesis in G1 does not match the new observation so only the first and third hypotheses in G1 need to be specialized. That would yield

G2 = {<small, blue, ?>, <small, ?, circle>, <?, blue, ?>, <big, ?, triangle>, <?, blue, triangle>}

However, since the first and last hypotheses in G2 above are specializations of the middle hypothesis (<?, blue, ?>), we drop those two, giving

G2 = {<small, ?, circle>, <?, blue, ?>, <big, ?, triangle>}
S2 = S1 = S0 = {<0, 0, 0>}

For the positive (small, red, circle) observation, you must generalize S and remove anything in G that is inconsistent, which gives

G3 = {<small, ?, circle>}
S3 = {<small, red, circle>}

(big, blue, circle) is the next negative example. But since it in not consistent with G, there is nothing to do so

G4 = G3 = {<small, ?, circle>}
S4 = S3 = {<small, red, circle>}

Lastly, you have the positive example of (small, blue, circle), which requires you to generalize S to make it consistent with the example, giving

G5 = {<small, ?, circle>}
S5 = {<small, ?, circle>}

Since G and S are equal, you have learned the concept of "small circles".

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