213

I have a collection of BigDecimals (in this example, a LinkedList) that I would like to add together. Is it possible to use streams for this?

I noticed the Stream class has several methods

Stream::mapToInt
Stream::mapToDouble
Stream::mapToLong

Each of which has a convenient sum() method. But, as we know, float and double arithmetic is almost always a bad idea.

So, is there a convenient way to sum up BigDecimals?

This is the code I have so far.

public static void main(String[] args) {
    LinkedList<BigDecimal> values = new LinkedList<>();
    values.add(BigDecimal.valueOf(.1));
    values.add(BigDecimal.valueOf(1.1));
    values.add(BigDecimal.valueOf(2.1));
    values.add(BigDecimal.valueOf(.1));

    // Classical Java approach
    BigDecimal sum = BigDecimal.ZERO;
    for(BigDecimal value : values) {
        System.out.println(value);
        sum = sum.add(value);
    }
    System.out.println("Sum = " + sum);

    // Java 8 approach
    values.forEach((value) -> System.out.println(value));
    System.out.println("Sum = " + values.stream().mapToDouble(BigDecimal::doubleValue).sum());
    System.out.println(values.stream().mapToDouble(BigDecimal::doubleValue).summaryStatistics().toString());
}

As you can see, I am summing up the BigDecimals using BigDecimal::doubleValue(), but this is (as expected) not precise.

Post-answer edit for posterity:

Both answers were extremely helpful. I wanted to add a little: my real-life scenario does not involve a collection of raw BigDecimals, they are wrapped in an invoice. But, I was able to modify Aman Agnihotri's answer to account for this by using the map() function for stream:

public static void main(String[] args) {

    LinkedList<Invoice> invoices = new LinkedList<>();
    invoices.add(new Invoice("C1", "I-001", BigDecimal.valueOf(.1), BigDecimal.valueOf(10)));
    invoices.add(new Invoice("C2", "I-002", BigDecimal.valueOf(.7), BigDecimal.valueOf(13)));
    invoices.add(new Invoice("C3", "I-003", BigDecimal.valueOf(2.3), BigDecimal.valueOf(8)));
    invoices.add(new Invoice("C4", "I-004", BigDecimal.valueOf(1.2), BigDecimal.valueOf(7)));

    // Classical Java approach
    BigDecimal sum = BigDecimal.ZERO;
    for(Invoice invoice : invoices) {
        BigDecimal total = invoice.unit_price.multiply(invoice.quantity);
        System.out.println(total);
        sum = sum.add(total);
    }
    System.out.println("Sum = " + sum);

    // Java 8 approach
    invoices.forEach((invoice) -> System.out.println(invoice.total()));
    System.out.println("Sum = " + invoices.stream().map((x) -> x.total()).reduce((x, y) -> x.add(y)).get());
}

static class Invoice {
    String company;
    String invoice_number;
    BigDecimal unit_price;
    BigDecimal quantity;

    public Invoice() {
        unit_price = BigDecimal.ZERO;
        quantity = BigDecimal.ZERO;
    }

    public Invoice(String company, String invoice_number, BigDecimal unit_price, BigDecimal quantity) {
        this.company = company;
        this.invoice_number = invoice_number;
        this.unit_price = unit_price;
        this.quantity = quantity;
    }

    public BigDecimal total() {
        return unit_price.multiply(quantity);
    }

    public void setUnit_price(BigDecimal unit_price) {
        this.unit_price = unit_price;
    }

    public void setQuantity(BigDecimal quantity) {
        this.quantity = quantity;
    }

    public void setInvoice_number(String invoice_number) {
        this.invoice_number = invoice_number;
    }

    public void setCompany(String company) {
        this.company = company;
    }

    public BigDecimal getUnit_price() {
        return unit_price;
    }

    public BigDecimal getQuantity() {
        return quantity;
    }

    public String getInvoice_number() {
        return invoice_number;
    }

    public String getCompany() {
        return company;
    }
}
1
  • The // Classical Java approach is the best one. Jul 1 at 16:33

5 Answers 5

418

Original answer

Yes, this is possible:

List<BigDecimal> bdList = new ArrayList<>();
//populate list
BigDecimal result = bdList.stream()
        .reduce(BigDecimal.ZERO, BigDecimal::add);

What it does is:

  1. Obtain a List<BigDecimal>.
  2. Turn it into a Stream<BigDecimal>
  3. Call the reduce method.

    3.1. We supply an identity value for addition, namely BigDecimal.ZERO.

    3.2. We specify the BinaryOperator<BigDecimal>, which adds two BigDecimal's, via a method reference BigDecimal::add.

Updated answer, after edit

I see that you have added new data, therefore the new answer will become:

List<Invoice> invoiceList = new ArrayList<>();
//populate
Function<Invoice, BigDecimal> totalMapper = invoice -> invoice.getUnit_price().multiply(invoice.getQuantity());
BigDecimal result = invoiceList.stream()
        .map(totalMapper)
        .reduce(BigDecimal.ZERO, BigDecimal::add);

It is mostly the same, except that I have added a totalMapper variable, that has a function from Invoice to BigDecimal and returns the total price of that invoice.

Then I obtain a Stream<Invoice>, map it to a Stream<BigDecimal> and then reduce it to a BigDecimal.

Now, from an OOP design point I would advice you to also actually use the total() method, which you have already defined, then it even becomes easier:

List<Invoice> invoiceList = new ArrayList<>();
//populate
BigDecimal result = invoiceList.stream()
        .map(Invoice::total)
        .reduce(BigDecimal.ZERO, BigDecimal::add);

Here we directly use the method reference in the map method.

6
  • 16
    +1 for Invoice::total vs invoice -> invoice.total().
    – ryvantage
    Mar 25, 2014 at 18:50
  • 12
    +1 for method references and for adding line breaks between stream operations, both of which IMHO improve readability considerably. Mar 26, 2014 at 0:37
  • how would it work if i wanted to add lets say Invoice::total and Invoice::tax into a new array Nov 13, 2015 at 5:26
  • Java standard library already have functions for summing integers/doubles like Collectors.summingInt(), but misses them for BigDecimals. Instead of writing reduce(blah blah blah) that is hard to read it would be better to write missing collector for BigDecimal and have .collect(summingBigDecimal()) at the end of your pipeline.
    – csharpfolk
    May 22, 2017 at 17:13
  • 2
    This approach can lead to NullponterException Sep 20, 2017 at 12:17
17

This post already has a checked answer, but the answer doesn't filter for null values. The correct answer should prevent null values by using the Object::nonNull function as a predicate.

BigDecimal result = invoiceList.stream()
    .map(Invoice::total)
    .filter(Objects::nonNull)
    .filter(i -> (i.getUnit_price() != null) && (i.getQuantity != null))
    .reduce(BigDecimal.ZERO, BigDecimal::add);

This prevents null values from attempting to be summed as we reduce.

1
  • The OP says "I have a collection of BigDecimal", null is not a BigDecimal. Jul 1 at 16:32
12

You can sum up the values of a BigDecimal stream using a reusable Collector named summingUp:

BigDecimal sum = bigDecimalStream.collect(summingUp());

The Collector can be implemented like this:

public static Collector<BigDecimal, ?, BigDecimal> summingUp() {
    return Collectors.reducing(BigDecimal.ZERO, BigDecimal::add);
}
7

Use this approach to sum the list of BigDecimal:

List<BigDecimal> values = ... // List of BigDecimal objects
BigDecimal sum = values.stream().reduce((x, y) -> x.add(y)).get();

This approach maps each BigDecimal as a BigDecimal only and reduces them by summing them, which is then returned using the get() method.

Here's another simple way to do the same summing:

List<BigDecimal> values = ... // List of BigDecimal objects
BigDecimal sum = values.stream().reduce(BigDecimal::add).get();

Update

If I were to write the class and lambda expression in the edited question, I would have written it as follows:

import java.math.BigDecimal;
import java.util.LinkedList;

public class Demo
{
  public static void main(String[] args)
  {
    LinkedList<Invoice> invoices = new LinkedList<>();
    invoices.add(new Invoice("C1", "I-001", BigDecimal.valueOf(.1), BigDecimal.valueOf(10)));
    invoices.add(new Invoice("C2", "I-002", BigDecimal.valueOf(.7), BigDecimal.valueOf(13)));
    invoices.add(new Invoice("C3", "I-003", BigDecimal.valueOf(2.3), BigDecimal.valueOf(8)));
    invoices.add(new Invoice("C4", "I-004", BigDecimal.valueOf(1.2), BigDecimal.valueOf(7)));

    // Java 8 approach, using Method Reference for mapping purposes.
    invoices.stream().map(Invoice::total).forEach(System.out::println);
    System.out.println("Sum = " + invoices.stream().map(Invoice::total).reduce((x, y) -> x.add(y)).get());
  }

  // This is just my style of writing classes. Yours can differ.
  static class Invoice
  {
    private String company;
    private String number;
    private BigDecimal unitPrice;
    private BigDecimal quantity;

    public Invoice()
    {
      unitPrice = quantity = BigDecimal.ZERO;
    }

    public Invoice(String company, String number, BigDecimal unitPrice, BigDecimal quantity)
    {
      setCompany(company);
      setNumber(number);
      setUnitPrice(unitPrice);
      setQuantity(quantity);
    }

    public BigDecimal total()
    {
      return unitPrice.multiply(quantity);
    }

    public String getCompany()
    {
      return company;
    }

    public void setCompany(String company)
    {
      this.company = company;
    }

    public String getNumber()
    {
      return number;
    }

    public void setNumber(String number)
    {
      this.number = number;
    }

    public BigDecimal getUnitPrice()
    {
      return unitPrice;
    }

    public void setUnitPrice(BigDecimal unitPrice)
    {
      this.unitPrice = unitPrice;
    }

    public BigDecimal getQuantity()
    {
      return quantity;
    }

    public void setQuantity(BigDecimal quantity)
    {
      this.quantity = quantity;
    }
  }
}
4
  • Isn't .map(n -> n) useless there? Also get() is not needed.
    – Rohit Jain
    Mar 25, 2014 at 13:48
  • @RohitJain: Updated. Thanks. I used get() as it returns the value of the Optional which is returned by the reduce call. If one wants to work with the Optional or just print out the sum, then yeah, get() isn't needed. But printing the Optional directly prints Optional[<Value>] based syntax which I doubt the user would need. So get() is needed in a way to get the value from the Optional. Mar 25, 2014 at 13:56
  • @ryvantage: Yes, your approach is exactly how I would have done it. :) Mar 25, 2014 at 18:09
  • Don't use an unconditional get call! If values is an empty list the optional will contain no value and will throw a NoSuchElementException when get is called. You can use values.stream().reduce(BigDecimal::add).orElse(BigDecimal.ZERO) instead.
    – eee
    Apr 2, 2016 at 10:31
5

If you don't mind a third party dependency, there is a class named Collectors2 in Eclipse Collections which contains methods returning Collectors for summing and summarizing BigDecimal and BigInteger. These methods take a Function as a parameter so you can extract a BigDecimal or BigInteger value from an object.

List<BigDecimal> list = mList(
        BigDecimal.valueOf(0.1),
        BigDecimal.valueOf(1.1),
        BigDecimal.valueOf(2.1),
        BigDecimal.valueOf(0.1));

BigDecimal sum =
        list.stream().collect(Collectors2.summingBigDecimal(e -> e));
Assert.assertEquals(BigDecimal.valueOf(3.4), sum);

BigDecimalSummaryStatistics statistics =
        list.stream().collect(Collectors2.summarizingBigDecimal(e -> e));
Assert.assertEquals(BigDecimal.valueOf(3.4), statistics.getSum());
Assert.assertEquals(BigDecimal.valueOf(0.1), statistics.getMin());
Assert.assertEquals(BigDecimal.valueOf(2.1), statistics.getMax());
Assert.assertEquals(BigDecimal.valueOf(0.85), statistics.getAverage());

Note: I am a committer for Eclipse Collections.

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