2

I want to make a table such that rows and columns are my variables and each cell shows the number of common values of two intersecting variables.

For example I have the following variables with the values.

 x    y    z
---  ---  ---
 *    b    #
 g    #    i
 #    *    l
 +    k    
      m    

Note that * and # are common in some variables. There is only one common value (i.e. #) between x and z, so the cell (x,z) will be one. The full table will look like the following.

    x    y    z
   ---  ---  ---
x | 4    2    1
y | 2    5    1
z | 1    1    3

How can I do it with SPSS and what are the keywords to describe this problem.

4
  • Interesting problem - do you know before hand what the symbol list will be? Will the list be relatively small?
    – Andy W
    Mar 26 '14 at 1:12
  • There will be 25 variables at least and 15 to 250 values in each variable. It is difficult to do by hand. I can highlight the duplicate values in excel but it doesn't help me count common values of any two variables and fill the 25x25 table.
    – sevenkul
    Mar 26 '14 at 8:46
  • Are all values distinct in each variable?
    – djhurio
    Mar 26 '14 at 11:44
  • yes, all the values in each variable are distinct in my case.
    – sevenkul
    Mar 26 '14 at 11:52
2

There is a solution using macro language.

Test data

*** Set the work directory.
cd "C:\temp".


*** Define the list of variable names.
* You can make it using Utilities / Variables... command.
define !varl() x y z !end.


*** Generate the test data.
data list free
 /x (a1) y (a1) z (a1).
begin data
* b #
g # i
# * l
+ k ""
"" m ""
end data.

save out "data.sav".


*** Open each variable in a new data file, drop blanks, sort and save.
define !get_sort_save(x = !cmdend)
!do !var !in (!x)

get "data.sav"
 /keep !var.

sel if !var <> "".

sort cases by !var.

save out !quote(!con(!var, ".sav")).

!doend
!end.


* Run.
!get_sort_save x = !varl.



*** Match each variable with all other variables and count the matched cases.
define !match_count(x = !cmdend)

!do !var1 !in (!x)

get !quote(!con(!var1, ".sav"))
 /ren !var1 = id.

!do !var2 !in (!x)

match files
 /file = *
 /table = !quote(!con(!var2, ".sav"))
 /ren !var2 = id
 /in !var2
 /by id.

!doend

agg out *
 /!x = sum(!x).

form !x (f8).

save out !quote(!con(!var1, "_n.sav")).

!doend
!end.


* Run.
!match_count x = !varl.


*** Add the counts.
define !add(x = !cmdend)
add files
!do !var !in (!x)
 /file = !quote(!con(!var, "_n.sav"))
!doend.
!end.


* Run.
!add x = !varl.

list.

The result is

       x        y        z

       4        2        1
       2        5        1
       1        1        3

Number of cases read:  3    Number of cases listed:  3

Real data

This is a code to run on real data. The data must be saved in a data file. There are three places in the code where you have to make changes. They are marked with TASK1, TASK2 and TASK3.

*** TASK1 - set the work directory - the directory where the data file is saved.
cd "C:\temp".


*** TASK2 -  Define the list of variable names.
define !varl() x y z !end.


*** Open each variable in a new data file, drop blanks, sort and save.
define !get_sort_save(x = !cmdend)
!do !var !in (!x)

*** TASK3 - change the file name.
get "data.sav"
 /keep !var.

sel if !var <> "".

sort cases by !var.

save out !quote(!con(!var, ".sav")).

!doend
!end.


* Run.
!get_sort_save x = !varl.



*** Match each variable with all other variables and count the matched cases.
define !match_count(x = !cmdend)

!do !var1 !in (!x)

get !quote(!con(!var1, ".sav"))
 /ren !var1 = id.

!do !var2 !in (!x)

match files
 /file = *
 /table = !quote(!con(!var2, ".sav"))
 /ren !var2 = id
 /in !var2
 /by id.

!doend

agg out *
 /!x = sum(!x).

form !x (f8).

save out !quote(!con(!var1, "_n.sav")).

!doend
!end.


* Run.
!match_count x = !varl.


*** Add the counts.
define !add(x = !cmdend)
add files
!do !var !in (!x)
 /file = !quote(!con(!var, "_n.sav"))
!doend.
!end.


* Run.
!add x = !varl.

list.
3
  • How can I apply this on the dataset that is already opened. Do I have to paste my data inside begin data and end data. Is there an easy way.
    – sevenkul
    Mar 27 '14 at 15:06
  • You do not have to copy the data in syntax. Save the data in a data file and use the code for real data. Change the working directory, variable names and file name accordingly. See the edited answer.
    – djhurio
    Mar 27 '14 at 19:56
  • @sevenkul, I recommend to save the data file in an empty folder. It is because other data files will be saved there as well. And do not make the data file name equal to any of variables names of interest.
    – djhurio
    Mar 27 '14 at 19:59
1

This was a bit of a challenge - so here is my attempt to code this up in a reasonable format. So first lets make a dataset that looks like yours.

DATA LIST FREE / x y z (3A1).
BEGIN DATA
 *    b    #
 g    #    i
 #    *    l
 +    k    ""
 ""   m    ""
END DATA.

Now what I do is make a consistent list of symbols and then a dummy variable signaling if that symbol is contained in the original variable.

VARSTOCASES /MAKE V from x TO z /INDEX OrigVar (V).
SORT CASES BY V OrigVar.
CASESTOVARS /ID = V /VIND ROOT = "D" /INDEX = OrigVar. 

You will see that the data now looks like below:

V Dx Dy Dz 
- -- -- --
*  1  1  0 
#  1  1  1 
+  1  0  0 
b  0  1  0 
g  1  0  0 
i  0  0  1 
k  0  1  0 
l  0  0  1 
m  0  1  0

Now if you multiply Dx and Dy and then sum the column that is the calculation of the intersection of your two sets. Here I make a macro to ease calculating all of those multiplications over a list. (Unfortunately you can not use the TO convention here, you will need to list out all 25 variables for your use application on this macro.)

DEFINE !PairInter (!POSITIONAL = !CMDEND).
!DO !I !IN (!1)
!DO !J !IN (!1)
  COMPUTE !CONCAT(!I,"_",!J) = !I*!J.
  FORMATS !CONCAT(!I,"_",!J) (F3.0).
!DOEND
!DOEND
!ENDDEFINE.

!PairInter Dx Dy Dz.

You will see you now have a list of variables Dx_Dx Dx_Dy Dx_Dz Dy_Dx ..... Dz_Dz that is the full set of interactions of those variables. I have intentionally written the redundant interactions as it makes making the table easier later on (although I might suggest when displaying the table to only display the lower half).

So now if we sum over the columns we will have the cardinality of each set along with its intersection. Here I use LAG and just keep the final value in the dataset.

DO REPEAT D = Dx_Dx TO Dz_Dz.
  IF ($casenum<>1) D = LAG(D) + D.
END REPEAT.
COMPUTE Order = $casenum.
SORT CASES BY Order (D).
SELECT IF ($casenum = 1).
MATCH FILES FILE = * /DROP V TO Dz Order.
EXECUTE.

Now you can write a MATRIX procedure to reshape the dataset and print out the table in a nicer format. Here I FLIP the dataset and then grab the original variable names.

STRING I (A1).
COMPUTE I = "I".
FLIP /NEWNAMES = I.
RENAME VARIABLES (CASE_LBL = V).
COMPUTE V = CHAR.SUBSTR(V,LENGTH(V)).
EXECUTE.

MATRIX.
GET I /FILE = * /VARIABLE = I.
GET V /FILE = * /VARIABLE = V.
COMPUTE I2 = RESHAPE(I,3,3).
COMPUTE V2 = V(1:3).
PRINT I2 /RNAMES =V2 /CNAMES = V2.
END MATRIX.

The printed MATRIX statement then reads the table of intersections you wanted.

Run MATRIX procedure: 

I2 
   x  y  z 
x  4  2  1 
y  2  5  1 
z  1  1  3 

------ END MATRIX -----

I've made this into a macro, available here. After defining the macro you can simply run

!InterSet x y z.

and it will print the table.

1
  • Thanks for showing how to make blanks in begin data - end data statement!
    – djhurio
    Mar 26 '14 at 14:01
1

Here is a simple Python solution. It creates a pivot table with the counts.

DATA LIST FREE / x (A1) y (A5) z (A8).
BEGIN DATA
 *    b    #
 g    #    i
 #    *    l
 +    k    ""
 ""   m    ""
END DATA.

begin program.
import spss, spssaux, spssdata

alldata = spssdata.Spssdata(names=False).fetchall()
nvars = len(alldata[0])
ncases = len(alldata)
vnames = [spss.GetVariableName(i) for i in range(nvars)]
empty = set([''])
varsets = {}
for v in range(nvars):
    varsets[v] = set([alldata[i][v].strip() for i in range(ncases)]).difference(empty)
rows = []
for v1 in range(nvars):
    counts = []
    for v2 in range(nvars):
        counts.append(len(varsets[v1].intersection(varsets[v2])))
    rows.append(counts)
spss.StartProcedure("ValuesInCommon")
table = spss.BasePivotTable("Values in Common", "COMMON")
table.SetDefaultFormatSpec(spss.FormatSpec.Count)
table.SimplePivotTable(rowdim = "Variable",
    rowlabels=vnames,
    coldim="Variables ",
    collabels=vnames,
    cells=rows)
spss.EndProcedure()
end program.
7
  • Thanks for this Jon. I updated the code slightly to difference out the empty string from the sets (so an empty strings isn't counted in the intersection). Now the counts are as the same as the OP initially stated.
    – Andy W
    Mar 26 '14 at 15:57
  • Thank you for this solution. This produces a nice table but its values are not correct. I don't know python to understand where the bug is.
    – sevenkul
    Mar 27 '14 at 14:48
  • The answers were correct in my tests. Tell us more about what you are seeing and what kinds of data you are feeding it.
    – JKP
    Mar 28 '14 at 2:03
  • I tried on SPSS 20 and fed the data in the question and I get 5 2 2 in the first row, 2 5 1 in the second and the 2 1 4 in the last one. Only the second row is correct. The data and the output is here.
    – sevenkul
    Mar 28 '14 at 8:47
  • @sevenkul - the data you uploaded has the strings set to A8, so it counts empty strings towards the intersections in the set of lists. In the above code if you change the line empty = set([' ']) to empty = set([' ']) it will not count them. There is probably a more direct way in Python, but as long as all the variables are of the same length setting the empty string to that length should work for this code.
    – Andy W
    Mar 28 '14 at 13:57

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