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New to R, and I have two data sets -- they have the same x-axis values, but the y-axis varies.

I'm trying to find the correlation between the two. When I use R to draw the ablines through the scatter plot, it gives me two lines-of-best-fit that seemingly makes one data set higher than the other -- but I'd really like to know the p-value between these two data sets to know the effect.

After looking it up, it seems like I should use t.test -- but I'm unsure how to run them against each other.

For example, if I run:

t.test(t1$xaxis,t1$yaxis1)
t.test(t2$xaxis,t2$yaxis2)

It gives me the right means of x and y (t1: 16.84, 88.58 and t2: 14.79, 86.14) -- but for the rest, I'm not sure:

t1: t = -43.8061, df = 105.994, p-value < 2.2e-16

t2: t = -60.1593, df = 232.742, p-value < 2.2e-16

Obviously the p-values given are (a) microscopic, and (b) I don't know how to make it tell me about the data sets relationship with each other -- and not individually.

Any help is greatly appreciated -- thanks!

  • Are you talking about a two-sample t-test? – Rich Scriven Mar 26 '14 at 2:57
  • the question doesn't make (statistical) sense. correlation between 2 datasets? p-value between two data sets? what are the two "lines-of-best-fit"? – djas Mar 26 '14 at 2:58
  • Do you want the p-values or the correlation matrix? I'm thinking cor might be what you want. – Rich Scriven Mar 26 '14 at 2:59
  • @RichardScriven I believe I am -- but I only suggested using a t-test, because after researching R (self-taught, if you couldn't tell), it seemed like the closest thing. I noticed that when I ran code like t.test(t1$xaxis,t1$yaxis) the result was a Welch Two Sample t-test, which I posted above. – Ryan Mar 26 '14 at 3:06
  • @djas Sorry -- you might be right. Essentially, I just want to know if my alternate hypothesis (which is that the y-values of t1 are greater than the y-values of t2) has a low enough p-value to reject the null hypothesis (that there's no difference). Does that make more sense? – Ryan Mar 26 '14 at 3:08
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Since you asked for it, here is how I understand your problem.

You have two groups of y values corresponding to identical x values. Here I assume that the relationship between y and x is linear. If it isn't you could transform your variables, use a non-linear model, an additive model, ...

First let's simulate some data since you don't provide any:

set.seed(42)
x <- 1:20
y1 <- 2.5 + 3 * x +rnorm(20)
y2 <- 4 + 2.5 * x +rnorm(20)

plot(y1~x, col="blue", ylab="y")
points(y2~x, col="red")
legend("topleft", legend=c("y1", "y2"), col=c("blue", "red"), pch=1)

enter image description here

Now, we want to know if the two samples differ. We can find out by fitting a model:

DF <- cbind(stack(cbind.data.frame(y1, y2)), x)
names(DF) <- c("y", "group", "x")

fit <- lm(y~x*group, data=DF)
summary(fit)

Call:
lm(formula = y ~ x * group, data = DF)

Residuals:
    Min      1Q  Median      3Q     Max 
-2.2585 -0.4603 -0.1899  0.9008  2.2127 

Coefficients:
            Estimate Std. Error t value Pr(>|t|)    
(Intercept)  3.51769    0.55148   6.379 2.17e-07 ***
x            2.92136    0.04604  63.457  < 2e-16 ***
groupy2      0.67218    0.77991   0.862    0.394    
x:groupy2   -0.46525    0.06511  -7.146 2.11e-08 ***
---
Signif. codes:  0 ‘***’ 0.001 ‘**’ 0.01 ‘*’ 0.05 ‘.’ 0.1 ‘ ’ 1

Residual standard error: 1.187 on 36 degrees of freedom
Multiple R-squared:  0.9949,    Adjusted R-squared:  0.9945 
F-statistic:  2333 on 3 and 36 DF,  p-value: < 2.2e-16

The intercepts are not significantly different, but the slopes are. If group is a significant effect, we can test best by comparing with a model that doesn't consider group:

fit0 <- lm(y~x, data=DF)
anova(fit0, fit)

Analysis of Variance Table

Model 1: y ~ x
Model 2: y ~ x * group
  Res.Df     RSS Df Sum of Sq      F    Pr(>F)    
1     38 300.196                                  
2     36  50.738  2    249.46 88.498 1.267e-14 ***
---
Signif. codes:  0 ‘***’ 0.001 ‘**’ 0.01 ‘*’ 0.05 ‘.’ 0.1 ‘ ’ 1

As you see, the samples are different.

1

Did you thought about merging the datasets based on x axis so that you data structure becomes like:

X Y1 Y2

Then you can find correlation between any of the columns you want.

1

You can easily find the correlation between variables with the cor function. In this case, I use a data frame first, then a matrix. We can easily see the strength of the relationships between variables.

> d <- data.frame(y1 = runif(10), y2 = rnorm(10), y3 = rexp(10))
> cor(d)
##            y1         y2         y3
## y1  1.0000000 -0.3319495 -0.4013154
## y2 -0.3319495  1.0000000  0.1370312
## y3 -0.4013154  0.1370312  1.0000000

Using a matrix,

> m <- matrix(c(runif(10), rnorm(10), rexp(10)), 10, 3)
> cor(m)
##            [,1]       [,2]      [,3]
## [1,]  1.0000000 -0.1971826 0.3622307
## [2,] -0.1971826  1.0000000 0.4973368
## [3,]  0.3622307  0.4973368 1.0000000

Please see example(cor) for more.

  • Thanks! This is very helpful -- is there also a similar way to do this if I don't have the same x variable in the future? – Ryan Mar 26 '14 at 3:24
  • Sure, just leave it out. That part really isn't relevant. I'll edit. – Rich Scriven Mar 26 '14 at 3:27
  • Thanks again! One more thing -- is there a similar way to do this if there are more/less rows in one data set over another? – Ryan Mar 26 '14 at 3:34
  • Yes, you can add NA values the shorter vector(s) to make them the same length, then use the use argument of cor to determine how to handle the NA values. – Rich Scriven Mar 26 '14 at 3:45
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Judging by your comments above, looks like you are after a 2-sample test of means. Is this what you are after? If so,

set.seed(1)
y1 = rnorm(100)
y2 = rnorm(120, mean=0.1)

results = t.test(y1,y2)
results$p.value
  • Thanks! This gave me a very small p-value as well -- but that could just be a good thing. And two questions just to be clear: (1) The set.seed(1) and defining y1 and y2 was just to give yourself 100 random variables [with different means] to run the t.test, right? And (2) Would this work differently in the future if I had different x-axes and/or more/less y values in one table than another? – Ryan Mar 26 '14 at 3:29
  • yes, it works for any two samples -- in fact, I just edited the answer to make this point. set.seed() just makes this example replicable. – djas Mar 26 '14 at 3:36

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