I would like to add a cumulative sum column to my Pandas dataframe so that:

name | day       | no
-----|-----------|----
Jack | Monday    | 10
Jack | Tuesday   | 20
Jack | Tuesday   | 10
Jack | Wednesday | 50
Jill | Monday    | 40
Jill | Wednesday | 110

becomes:

Jack | Monday     | 10  | 10
Jack | Tuesday    | 30  | 40
Jack | Wednesday  | 50  | 90
Jill | Monday     | 40  | 40
Jill | Wednesday  | 110 | 150

I tried various combos of df.groupby and df.agg(lambda x: cumsum(x)) to no avail. Thanks in advance!

  • Are you really sure that you want aggregation over week days? That loses the index, and also the cumulative sum makes less sense if there are multiple weeks. The answers by dmitry-andreev and @vjayky calculates cumsum over the sequence of days for each name instead. Think of how this could be extended if there were a date column too, that the entries could be sorted by before grouping and aggregating. – Elias Hasle Nov 8 at 8:09

This should do it, need groupby() twice.

In [52]:

print df
   name        day   no
0  Jack     Monday   10
1  Jack    Tuesday   20
2  Jack    Tuesday   10
3  Jack  Wednesday   50
4  Jill     Monday   40
5  Jill  Wednesday  110
In [53]:

print df.groupby(by=['name','day']).sum().groupby(level=[0]).cumsum()
                 no
name day           
Jack Monday      10
     Tuesday     40
     Wednesday   90
Jill Monday      40
     Wednesday  150

Note, the resulting DataFrame has MultiIndex.

  • 3
    Thanks for the answer. I did have some queries though: 1. Can you please explain what does 'level = [0]' mean? 2. Also, as you can see, you had row numbers in your data frame before and these row numbers go away once you do the cumulative sum. Is there a way to have them back? – user3694373 Oct 16 '14 at 21:31
  • 2
    1), The index number has to go, as the cumsums are from multiple rows, like the 2nd number, 40, is 10+20+10, which index value should it get? 1, 2 or 3? So, let's keep using name and day as multiIndex, which make better sense (reset_index() to get int index, if desired). 2), the level=[0] means groupby is to operate by the 1st level of MultiIndex, namely column name. – CT Zhu Oct 17 '14 at 0:23
  • Thanks CT. I understood that later and tried reset_index() to solve my issue. Thanks for the detailed explanation! – user3694373 Oct 17 '14 at 1:59
  • 1
    There's a subtle bug: the first groupby() defaults to sorting the keys, so if you add a Jack-Thursday row at the bottom of the input dataset you'll get unexpected results. And since groupby() can work with level names I find df.groupby(['name', 'day'], sort=False).sum().groupby(by='name').cumsum().reset_index() less cryptic. – Nickolay May 27 at 22:57

This works in pandas 0.16.2

In[23]: print df
        name          day   no
0      Jack       Monday    10
1      Jack      Tuesday    20
2      Jack      Tuesday    10
3      Jack    Wednesday    50
4      Jill       Monday    40
5      Jill    Wednesday   110
In[24]: df['no_cumulative'] = df.groupby(['name'])['no'].apply(lambda x: x.cumsum())
In[25]: print df
        name          day   no  no_cumulative
0      Jack       Monday    10             10
1      Jack      Tuesday    20             30
2      Jack      Tuesday    10             40
3      Jack    Wednesday    50             90
4      Jill       Monday    40             40
5      Jill    Wednesday   110            150
  • Showing how to add it back to the df is really helpful. I tried using a transform, but that didn't play nicely with cumsum(). – zerovector May 26 '16 at 10:09
  • Note that this answer (seems equivalent to the simpler solution by @vjayky) does not aggregate by name and day before calculating the cumulative sum by name (note: there are 2 rows for Jack+Tuesday in the result). This is what makes it simpler than the answer by CT Zhu. – Nickolay May 27 at 22:09

Modification to @Dmitry's answer. This is simpler and works in pandas 0.19.0:

print(df) 

 name        day   no
0  Jack     Monday   10
1  Jack    Tuesday   20
2  Jack    Tuesday   10
3  Jack  Wednesday   50
4  Jill     Monday   40
5  Jill  Wednesday  110

df['no_csum'] = df.groupby(['name'])['no'].cumsum()

print(df)
   name        day   no  no_csum
0  Jack     Monday   10       10
1  Jack    Tuesday   20       30
2  Jack    Tuesday   10       40
3  Jack  Wednesday   50       90
4  Jill     Monday   40       40
5  Jill  Wednesday  110      150

Instead of df.groupby(by=['name','day']).sum().groupby(level=[0]).cumsum() (see above) you could also do a df.set_index(['name', 'day']).groupby(level=0, as_index=False).cumsum()

  • df.groupby(by=['name','day']).sum() is actually just moving both columns to a MultiIndex
  • as_index=False means you do not need to call reset_index afterwards
  • Thanks for posting this, it helped me understand what's going on here! Note that groupby().sum() is not just moving both columns to MultiIndex -- it also sums up the two values for Jack+Tuesday. And as_index=False doesn't seem to have any effect in this case, since the index was already set before the groupby. And since groupby().cumsum() nukes the name/day from the data frame's columns, you have to either add the resulting numeric column to the original data frame (like vjayky and Dmitry suggested), or move name/day to index, and reset_index afterwards. – Nickolay May 27 at 22:39

you should use

df['cum_no'] = df.no.cumsum()

http://pandas.pydata.org/pandas-docs/version/0.19.2/generated/pandas.DataFrame.cumsum.html

Another way of doing it

import pandas as pd
df = pd.DataFrame({'C1' : ['a','a','a','b','b'],
           'C2' : [1,2,3,4,5]})
df['cumsum'] = df.groupby(by=['C1'])['C2'].transform(lambda x: x.cumsum())
df

enter image description here

  • 1
    This calculates a global running total, instead of a separate sum for each group separately. So Jill-Monday gets assigned a value of 130 (90, as the sum of all Jack's values, + 40, the value for Jill-Monday). – Nickolay May 27 at 22:46
  • @Nickolay just added another answer let me know if it works – sushmit May 30 at 17:42

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