42

I would like to have three plots in single figure. The figure should have a subplot layout of two by two, where the first plot should occupy the first two subplot cells (i.e. the whole first row of plot cells) and the other plots should be positioned underneath the first one in cells 3 and 4. I know that matlab allows this by using the subplot command like so

subplot(2,2,[1,2]) % the plot will span subplots 1 and 2

Is it also possible in pyplot to have a single axes occupy more than one subplot? The docstring of pyplot.subplot doesn't talk about it.

Anyone got an easy solution? Thanks in advance

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49

You can simply do:

import numpy as np
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt

x = np.arange(0, 7, 0.01)
    
plt.subplot(2, 1, 1)
plt.plot(x, np.sin(x))
    
plt.subplot(2, 2, 3)
plt.plot(x, np.cos(x))
    
plt.subplot(2, 2, 4)
plt.plot(x, np.sin(x)*np.cos(x))

i.e., the first plot is really a plot in the upper half (the figure is only divided into 21 = 2 cells), and the following two smaller plots are done in a 22=4 cell grid. The third argument to subplot() is the positon of the plot inside the grid: for example in the second subplot (subplot(2, 2, 3)), the axes will go to the third section of the 2*2 matrix i.e, to the bottom-left corner.

enter image description here

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  • 7
    While this answers the specific example given in the question, it's unclear how this applies to layouts which are not powers of 2. For my code I would like to split the layout into thirds. A plot to fill right 2 thirds and another plot filling a left third. – AnnanFay Mar 24 '16 at 17:45
  • 2
    This answer actually applies to regular layouts (no "power of 2" constraint): subplot(3, 1, 1), for instance, cuts in thirds. Now, what you want is handled by the axes_grid toolkit. – Eric O Lebigot Mar 25 '16 at 20:52
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    @EOL, I'm thinking of 2 thirds, not 1 thirds. For example, I have two subplot , with only 1 column, the 1st spans 2/3, the 2nd spans 1/3. How could this be done? THanks. – StayFoolish Dec 10 '17 at 12:04
  • I am not fully sure, but it looks like the appropriate method is described in a specific Matplotlib toolkit (axes_grid1): matplotlib.org/2.0.2/mpl_toolkits/axes_grid/users/…. – Eric O Lebigot Dec 11 '17 at 22:03
38

To have multiple subplots with an axis occupy, you can simply do:

from matplotlib import pyplot as plt
import numpy as np

b=np.linspace(-np.pi, np.pi, 100)

a1=np.sin(b)

a2=np.cos(b)

a3=a1*a2

plt.subplot(221)
plt.plot(b, a1)
plt.title('sin(x)')

plt.subplot(222)
plt.plot(b, a2)
plt.title('cos(x)')

plt.subplot(212)
plt.plot(b, a3)
plt.title('sin(x)*cos(x)')

plt.show()

enter image description here

Another way is

plt.subplot(222)
plt.plot(b, a1)
plt.title('sin(x)')

plt.subplot(224)
plt.plot(b, a2)
plt.title('cos(x)')

plt.subplot(121)
plt.plot(b, a3)
plt.title('sin(x)*cos(x)')

plt.show()

enter image description here

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13

For finer-grained control you might want to use the subplot2grid module of matplotlib.pyplot.

http://matplotlib.org/users/gridspec.html

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    very cool, didn't know about this, exactly what I need, especially the colspan and rowspan features. – mxmlnkn Nov 26 '17 at 23:42
12

The Using Gridspec to make multi-column/row subplot layouts shows a way to do this with GridSpec. A simplified version of the example with 3 subplots would look like

import matplotlib.pyplot as plt

fig = plt.figure()

gs = fig.add_gridspec(2,2)
ax1 = fig.add_subplot(gs[0, 0])
ax2 = fig.add_subplot(gs[0, 1])
ax3 = fig.add_subplot(gs[1, :])

plt.show()

enter image description here

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  • so so so SO. awesome! thanks a million. this is necessary if you have for instance 6 rows... and you want one plot on row 1. and another plot to span rows 2,3,4. you can't use the usual subplot tricks (i.e. subplot(611) and subplot(612)... because subplot doesn't have any idea of span). – Trevor Boyd Smith Jun 7 '19 at 18:38
1

There are three main options in matplotlib to make separate plots within a figure:

  1. subplot: access the axes array and add subplots
  2. gridspec: control the geometric properties of the underlying figure (demo)
  3. subplots: wraps the first two in a convenient api (demo)

The posts so far have addressed the first two options, but they have not mentioned the third, which is the more modern approach and is based on the first two options. See the specific docs Combining two subplots using subplots and GridSpec.

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