12

How we can make vignette filter in opencv? Do we need to implement any algorithm for it or only to play with the values of BGR ? How we can make this type of filters. I saw its implementation here but i didn't understand it clearly . Anyone with complete algorithms guidance and implementation guidance is highly appriciated.

After Abid rehman K answer I tried this in c++

int main()
{
    Mat v;
    Mat img = imread ("D:\\2.jpg");
    img.convertTo(v, CV_32F);
    Mat a,b,c,d,e;
    c.create(img.rows,img.cols,CV_32F);
    d.create(img.rows,img.cols,CV_32F);
    e.create(img.rows,img.cols,CV_32F);

    a = getGaussianKernel(img.cols,300,CV_32F);

    b = getGaussianKernel(img.rows,300,CV_32F);


    c = b*a.t();

    double minVal;     
    double maxVal;          
    cv::minMaxLoc(c, &minVal, &maxVal);

        d = c/maxVal;
    e = v*d ;        // This line causing error
    imshow ("venyiet" , e);
    cvWaitKey();
}

d is displaying right but e=v*d line is causing runtime error of

OpenCV Error: Assertion failed (type == B.type() && (type == CV_32FC1 || type ==
CV_64FC1 || type == CV_32FC2 || type == CV_64FC2)) in unknown function, file ..
\..\..\src\opencv\modules\core\src\matmul.cpp, line 711
7
  • You didn't do c=b*a.T function. Apr 4, 2014 at 6:27
  • i did i forget to upload here , actually i upload d image , it shows vignete without image
    – AHF
    Apr 4, 2014 at 6:36
  • @Ahmad It's not that I don't want to help you, but Abid's answer is as good as it gets. Apr 4, 2014 at 19:32
  • Yes no doubt its answer is impressive but i am trying my work in c++ and i am just getting hurdle in coversion
    – AHF
    Apr 4, 2014 at 19:36
  • The problem is that v and d are both CV_32F which is not a format supported by that operation. Apr 4, 2014 at 21:02

5 Answers 5

18
+50

First of all, Abid Rahman K describes the easiest way to go about this filter. You should seriously study his answer with time and attention. Wikipedia's take on Vignetting is also quite clarifying for those that had never heard about this filter.

Browny's implementation of this filter is considerably more complex. However, I ported his code to the C++ API and simplified it so you can follow the instructions yourself.

#include <math.h>

#include <vector>

#include <cv.hpp>
#include <highgui/highgui.hpp>


// Helper function to calculate the distance between 2 points.
double dist(CvPoint a, CvPoint b)
{
    return sqrt(pow((double) (a.x - b.x), 2) + pow((double) (a.y - b.y), 2));
}

// Helper function that computes the longest distance from the edge to the center point.
double getMaxDisFromCorners(const cv::Size& imgSize, const cv::Point& center)
{
    // given a rect and a line
    // get which corner of rect is farthest from the line

    std::vector<cv::Point> corners(4);
    corners[0] = cv::Point(0, 0);
    corners[1] = cv::Point(imgSize.width, 0);
    corners[2] = cv::Point(0, imgSize.height);
    corners[3] = cv::Point(imgSize.width, imgSize.height);

    double maxDis = 0;
    for (int i = 0; i < 4; ++i)
    {
        double dis = dist(corners[i], center);
        if (maxDis < dis)
            maxDis = dis;
    }

    return maxDis;
}

// Helper function that creates a gradient image.   
// firstPt, radius and power, are variables that control the artistic effect of the filter.
void generateGradient(cv::Mat& mask)
{
    cv::Point firstPt = cv::Point(mask.size().width/2, mask.size().height/2);
    double radius = 1.0;
    double power = 0.8;

    double maxImageRad = radius * getMaxDisFromCorners(mask.size(), firstPt);

    mask.setTo(cv::Scalar(1));
    for (int i = 0; i < mask.rows; i++)
    {
        for (int j = 0; j < mask.cols; j++)
        {
            double temp = dist(firstPt, cv::Point(j, i)) / maxImageRad;
            temp = temp * power;
            double temp_s = pow(cos(temp), 4);
            mask.at<double>(i, j) = temp_s;
        }
    }
}

// This is where the fun starts!
int main()
{
    cv::Mat img = cv::imread("stack-exchange-chefs.jpg");
    if (img.empty())
    {
        std::cout << "!!! Failed imread\n";
        return -1;
    }

    /*
    cv::namedWindow("Original", cv::WINDOW_NORMAL);
    cv::resizeWindow("Original", img.size().width/2, img.size().height/2);
    cv::imshow("Original", img);
    */

What img looks like:

    cv::Mat maskImg(img.size(), CV_64F);
    generateGradient(maskImg);

    /*
    cv::Mat gradient;
    cv::normalize(maskImg, gradient, 0, 255, CV_MINMAX);
    cv::imwrite("gradient.png", gradient);
    */

What maskImg looks like:

    cv::Mat labImg(img.size(), CV_8UC3);
    cv::cvtColor(img, labImg, CV_BGR2Lab);

    for (int row = 0; row < labImg.size().height; row++)
    {
        for (int col = 0; col < labImg.size().width; col++)
        {
            cv::Vec3b value = labImg.at<cv::Vec3b>(row, col);
            value.val[0] *= maskImg.at<double>(row, col);
            labImg.at<cv::Vec3b>(row, col) =  value;
        }
    }

    cv::Mat output;
    cv::cvtColor(labImg, output, CV_Lab2BGR);
    //cv::imwrite("vignette.png", output);

    cv::namedWindow("Vignette", cv::WINDOW_NORMAL);
    cv::resizeWindow("Vignette", output.size().width/2, output.size().height/2);
    cv::imshow("Vignette", output);
    cv::waitKey();

    return 0;
}

What output looks like:

As stated in the code above, by changing the values of firstPt, radius and power you can achieve stronger/weaker artistic effects.

Good luck!

8
  • 1
    +1 - Haha... thanks karl... You reduced my job. After a recent format of my laptop, I had to setup all C++ environment once again (too busy and lazy for that right now). Apr 5, 2014 at 5:53
  • 1
    @karlphillip I enjoy your every answer on SO , well explained and well formated but the bad thing is I always need to address you for attention :P well thank you
    – AHF
    Apr 5, 2014 at 9:16
  • 1
    Oh... First I thought that image is from some movie. But they are the chefs at stackexchange, right? She looks like she is going to beat somebody :P Apr 5, 2014 at 9:20
  • Hehe :) This picture is really funny! Apr 5, 2014 at 13:12
  • 1
    nice answer +1 , but why we need to find which corner of rect is farthest from the line
    – Rocket
    May 5, 2014 at 8:24
13

You can do a simple implementation using Gaussian Kernels available in OpenCV.

  1. Load the image, Get its number of rows and columns
  2. Create two Gaussian Kernels of size rows and columns, say A,B. Its variance depends upon your needs.
  3. C = transpose(A)*B, ie multiply a column vector with a row vector such that result array should be same size as that of the image.
  4. D = C/C.max()
  5. E = img*D

See the implementation below (for a grayscale image):

import cv2
import numpy as np
from matplotlib import pyplot as plt

img = cv2.imread('temp.jpg',0)
row,cols = img.shape

a = cv2.getGaussianKernel(cols,300)
b = cv2.getGaussianKernel(rows,300)
c = b*a.T
d = c/c.max()
e = img*d

cv2.imwrite('vig2.png',e)

Below is my result:

enter image description here

Similarly for Color image:

enter image description here

NOTE : Of course, it is centered. You will need to make additional modifications to move focus to other places.

13
  • Can you please show me demo in c++ ? i am trying to convert it but its showing me error's
    – AHF
    Apr 3, 2014 at 19:33
  • what is the function of max ()
    – AHF
    Apr 4, 2014 at 6:10
  • max() finds the maximum in the image. I will try in C++ tonight. But it is pretty straight-forward. You can do it with help of docs.opencv.org. Apr 4, 2014 at 6:18
  • is A*B allowed in C++? isn't there something like cv::multiply for that? Apr 4, 2014 at 6:26
  • 1
    @Ahmad Edit the code in the question, share your C++ code and then inform the error message that you get. Don't forget to tell us the line that is causing the error. Apr 4, 2014 at 19:34
4

Similar one close to Abid's Answer. But the code is for the colored image

import cv2
import numpy as np
from matplotlib import pyplot as plt

img = cv2.imread('turtle.jpg',1)
rows,cols = img.shape[:2]
zeros = np.copy(img)
zeros[:,:,:] = 0
a = cv2.getGaussianKernel(cols,900)
b = cv2.getGaussianKernel(rows,900)
c = b*a.T
d = c/c.max()
zeros[:,:,0] = img[:,:,0]*d
zeros[:,:,1] = img[:,:,1]*d
zeros[:,:,2] = img[:,:,2]*d

cv2.imwrite('vig2.png',zeros)

Original Image (Taken from Pexels under CC0 Licence)

Original Image (Taken from Pexels under CC0 Licence)

After Applying Vignette with a sigma of 900 (i.e `cv2.getGaussianKernel(cols,900))

After Applying Vignette with a \sigma of 900 (Note that I have compressed the Image using Facebook. And hence the quality is low. Otherwise the filter has nothing to do in changing the quality or sharpness of the image )

After Applying Vignette with a sigma of 300 (i.e `cv2.getGaussianKernel(cols,300))

enter image description here

Additionally you can focus the vignette effect to the cordinates of your wish by simply shifting the mean of the gaussian to your focus point as follows.

import cv2
import numpy as np

img = cv2.imread('turtle.jpg',1)

fx,fy = 1465,180 # Add your Focus cordinates here
fx,fy = 145,1000 # Add your Focus cordinates here
sigma = 300 # Standard Deviation of the Gaussian
rows,cols = img.shape[:2]
fxn = fx - cols//2 # Normalised temperory vars
fyn = fy - rows//2

zeros = np.copy(img)
zeros[:,:,:] = 0

a = cv2.getGaussianKernel(2*cols ,sigma)[cols-fx:2*cols-fx]
b = cv2.getGaussianKernel(2*rows ,sigma)[rows-fy:2*rows-fy]
c = b*a.T
d = c/c.max()
zeros[:,:,0] = img[:,:,0]*d
zeros[:,:,1] = img[:,:,1]*d
zeros[:,:,2] = img[:,:,2]*d

zeros = add_alpha(zeros)
cv2.imwrite('vig4.png',zeros)

The size of the turtle image is 1980x1200 (WxH). The following is an example focussing at the cordinate 1465,180 (i.e fx,fy = 1465,180) (Note that I have reduced the variance to exemplify the change in focus)

enter image description here

The following is an example focussing at the cordinate 145,1000 (i.e fx,fy = 145,1000)

enter image description here

2
  • I love the simplicity and will give you a +1 if you are able to share the resulting image. Nov 26, 2019 at 17:45
  • 1
    @karlphillip Have made some more additions. The focus of the vignette can be manually fixed. With a simple (and obvious) trick of shifting the gaussians
    – Trect
    Nov 27, 2019 at 20:44
1

Here is my c++ implementation of Vignette filter on Colored Image using opencv. It is faster than the accepted answer.

#include "opencv2/core/core.hpp"
#include "opencv2/highgui/highgui.hpp"
#include "opencv2/imgproc/imgproc.hpp"
#include <iostream>

using namespace cv;
using namespace std;

double fastCos(double x){
    x += 1.57079632;
    if (x >  3.14159265)
        x -= 6.28318531;
    if (x < 0)
        return 1.27323954 * x + 0.405284735 * x * x;
    else
        return 1.27323954 * x - 0.405284735 * x * x;
}

double dist(double ax, double ay,double bx, double by){
    return sqrt((ax - bx)*(ax - bx) + (ay - by)*(ay - by));
}

int main(int argv, char** argc){
    Mat src = cv::imread("filename_of_your_image.jpg");
    Mat dst = Mat::zeros(src.size(), src.type());
    double radius; //value greater than 0, 
                   //greater the value lesser the visible vignette
                   //for a medium vignette use a value in range(0.5-1.5) 
    cin << radius;
    double cx = (double)src.cols/2, cy = (double)src.rows/2;
    double maxDis = radius * dist(0,0,cx,cy);
    double temp;
    for (int y = 0; y < src.rows; y++) {
        for (int x = 0; x < src.cols; x++) {
            temp = fastCos(dist(cx, cy, x, y) / maxDis);
            temp *= temp;
            dst.at<Vec3b>(y, x)[0] =
                    saturate_cast<uchar>((src.at<Vec3b>(y, x)[0]) * temp);
            dst.at<Vec3b>(y, x)[1] =
                    saturate_cast<uchar>((src.at<Vec3b>(y, x)[1]) * temp );
            dst.at<Vec3b>(y, x)[2] =
                    saturate_cast<uchar>((src.at<Vec3b>(y, x)[2]) * temp);

        }
    }
    imshow ("Vignetted Image", dst);
    waitKey(0);
}
1
  • 1
    That's a bold statement. Mind showing any benchmarks?
    – iehrlich
    Jul 11, 2017 at 20:49
0

Here is a C++ implementation of Vignetting for Grayscale Image

#include "opencv2/opencv.hpp"
#include "opencv2/core/core.hpp"
#include "opencv2/highgui/highgui.hpp"
#include "opencv2/imgproc/imgproc.hpp"
#include <iostream>

using namespace cv;
using namespace std;

int main(int argv, char** argc)
 {
     Mat test = imread("test.jpg", IMREAD_GRAYSCALE);

     Mat kernel_X = getGaussianKernel(test.cols, 100);
     Mat kernel_Y = getGaussianKernel(test.rows, 100);
     Mat kernel_X_transpose;
     transpose(kernel_X, kernel_X_transpose);
     Mat kernel = kernel_Y * kernel_X_transpose;

     Mat mask_v, proc_img;
     normalize(kernel, mask_v, 0, 1, NORM_MINMAX);
     test.convertTo(proc_img, CV_64F);
     multiply(mask_v, proc_img, proc_img);
     convertScaleAbs(proc_img, proc_img);
     imshow ("Vignette", proc_img);
     waitKey(0);

     return 0;
 }

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