50

I would like my Gradle build script to add the complete Classpath to the manifest file contained in JAR file created after the build.

Example:

Manifest-Version: 1.0
Class-Path: MyProject.jar SomeLibrary.jar AnotherLib.jar

My build script already add some information to the manifest this way:

jar {
    manifest {
        attributes("Implementation-Title": project.name,
            "Implementation-Version": version,
            "Main-Class": mainClassName,
    }
}

How do I get the list of dependencies to add to the manifest?


This page of Java tutorials describes more in detail how and why adding classpath to the manifest: Adding Classes to the JAR File's Classpath

75

Found a solution on Gradle's forum:

jar {
  manifest {
    attributes(
      "Class-Path": configurations.compile.collect { it.getName() }.join(' '))
  }
}

Source: Manifest with Classpath in Jar Task for Subprojects

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  • 15
    This may be more obvious to some people than it is to others.. But make sure the jar target rules are called after your dependency rules. This minor detail got me stuck for quite a while today.. See this gist for an example. – user909694 Nov 12 '14 at 8:31
  • 3
    ..and then if ya'll want to package the application together with external dependencies see this gist. The distribution zip will go to folder build\distributions. – Martin Andersson Mar 3 '15 at 6:00
  • I needed to remove the collect {} portion to make it work for me. That assumes that all the dependencies are in the same folder as your main class, which wasn't true for me. – AutonomousApps Feb 13 '17 at 18:43
  • As per the linked post in the old Gradle forums it should use configurations.runtime rather than configurations.compile. Using up-to-date gradle it would be configurations.runtimeClasspath – swpalmer Nov 28 '17 at 21:20
  • 1
    if it doesn't work, try replacing name with absolutePath. – Vikas Dec 14 '17 at 23:22
24

In the latest versions of gradle, compile and runtime becomes deprecated. Instead, use runtimeClasspath as follows:

'Class-Path': configurations.runtimeClasspath.files.collect { it.getName() }.join(' ')

EDIT:

Note that if you are using Kotlin DSL, you can configure the manifest as follows:

configure<JavaPluginConvention> {
    sourceCompatibility = JavaVersion.VERSION_1_8
    targetCompatibility = JavaVersion.VERSION_1_8
    manifest {
        attributes(
                "Manifest-Version" to "1.0",
                "Main-Class" to "io.fouad.AppLauncher")
    }
}

tasks.withType(Jar::class) {
    manifest {
        attributes["Manifest-Version"] = "1.0"
        attributes["Main-Class"] = "io.fouad.AppLauncher"
    }
}
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  • for gradle 4.0+ for compileOnly jar { doFirst { manifest.attributes( 'Dependencies': configurations.compileOnly.files.collect { it.name }.join(' '), ) } } – Mr00Anderson May 23 '18 at 16:57
  • I have to use it.canonicalPath – sify Oct 27 at 9:25
7

Place this at the end of the buid.gradle file. Change the com.example.Main to your own Main class.

jar {
    doFirst {
        manifest {
            if (!configurations.compile.isEmpty()) {
                attributes(
                        'Class-Path': configurations.compile.collect{it.toURI().toString()}.join(' '),
                        'Main-Class': 'com.example.Main')
            }
        }
    }
}
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5

The top answers her helped me a lot. Here is what worked for me:

jar {
manifest {
    attributes "Main-Class": "your.package.classWithMain"
    attributes "Class-Path": configurations.compile.collect { it.absolutePath }.join(" ")
}
}

So, instead of name, I had to use absolutePath. This may or may not work for you. Some suggest using runtime instead of compile. I used compile because, I have a compile section in dependencies in my build.gradle. So, the jar step picks up dependencies from there. The best thing to do is pick up something that you think will work, do a gradle build, then find the JAR file and expand it to find the META-INF/MANIFEST.MF file. You should be able to see all the directories separated by spaces. If not, you should try something different. Autocomplete feature of your IDE should be helpful in seeing what all methods or fields are available under configurations/compile etc. All this can be done easily in IntelliJ.

Oh.. and if you want to see where the library JARs are physically located on your disk, right click on your project->open module settings->Libraries and then click on any library.

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2

I know this is likely trivial for the groovy people here, but in my case, I wanted to change the location of the Class-Path in the manifest file depending on whether I was going to run in the production environment or local environment. I did this by making my build.gradle's jar section look like this:

jar {
  from configurations.runtime
  manifest {
    attributes ('Main-Class': 'com.me.Main',
                'Class-Path': configurations.runtime.files.collect { jarDir+"/$it.name" }.join(' ')
               )
  }
}

In this case, the argument to gradle build is passed like so:

$ gradle build -PjarDir="/opt/silly/path/"
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0

I had a similar yet not identical problem. I was publishing my lib jar L in the artifactory, and later fetching it as a dependency of module M, but the transitive dependencies, the ones which L need for compile and runtime, did not arrive with it. It took me sometime to realize that my jar was published into the artifactory with an empty pom file, hence gradle was not able to know which are L's transitive dependencies to be fetched. The missing piece was an instruction, in the L's build.gradle, to publish the pom. As often with gradle, the connection between the name of the insturction, and its meaning, is completely:

apply plugin: 'maven'

uploadArchives {
    repositories {
        mavenDeployer {
            repository(url: "file://localhost/tmp/myRepo/")
        }
    }
} 

Source: uploading_to_maven_repositories

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0

Looks like gradle has evolved. This is another answer that looks similar to others, but there is a key difference: if you use a new keyword implementation in the dependencies, none of the other answers will work and you'll get an empty class path

dependencies {
    // ensure the keyword here matches what 
    // you have in the jar->manifest->attributes
    // that is "implementation"
    implementation 'org.jetbrains.kotlinx:kotlinx-coroutines-core:1.3.3'
    // ...
}

// by default, implementation cannot be referenced, 
// this allows us to use it below
project.configurations.implementation.setCanBeResolved(true)

jar{
    manifest {
        attributes(
                "Main-Class": "app.Program",                
                "Class-Path":  configurations.implementation.collect { it.name }.join(' ')              
        )
    }
    dependsOn ('dependencies')
}
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0

I tried to create a simple java application with gradle with the following requirements

  1. The application has external jar dependencies
  2. Create a runnable fat jar with all dependent classes copied to the jar
  3. Create a runnable jar with all dependent libraries copied to a directory "dependencies" and add the classpath in the manifest.

Here is my solution.
Runnable fat Jar

task fatJar(type: Jar) {
 clean
 println("Creating fat jar")
 manifest {
    attributes 'Main-Class': 'com.abc.gradle.hello.App'
 }
 archiveName "${runnableJar}"
 from {
    configurations.compile.collect { it.isDirectory() ? it : zipTree(it) }
    configurations.runtimeClasspath.collect { it.isDirectory() ? it : zipTree(it) }
 } with jar
 println("Fat jar is created")
}

Copy Dependencies

task copyDepends(type: Copy) {
   from configurations.default
   into "${dependsDir}"
}

Create jar with classpath dependecies in manifest

task createJar(type: Jar) {
   println("Cleaning...")
   clean
   manifest {
    attributes('Main-Class': 'com.abc.gradle.hello.App',
            'Class-Path': configurations.default.collect { 'dependencies/' + 
             it.getName() }.join(' ')
    )
}
  from {
      configurations.compile.collect { it.isDirectory() ? it : zipTree(it) }
  } with jar
  println "${outputJar} created"
}

Here is the complete build.gradle

plugins {
    id 'java'
   id 'application'
}
repositories {
    mavenCentral()
}
dependencies {
  implementation 'org.slf4j:slf4j-api:1.7.30'
  implementation 'ch.qos.logback:logback-classic:1.2.3'
  implementation 'ch.qos.logback:logback-core:1.2.3'
  testImplementation 'junit:junit:4.13'
}
def outputJar = "${buildDir}/libs/${rootProject.name}.jar"
def dependsDir = "${buildDir}/libs/dependencies/"
def runnableJar = "${rootProject.name}_fat.jar";

//Create runnable fat jar
task fatJar(type: Jar) {
   clean
   println("Creating fat jar")
   manifest {
    attributes 'Main-Class': 'com.abc.gradle.hello.App'
  }
  archiveName "${runnableJar}"
  from {
    configurations.compile.collect { it.isDirectory() ? it : zipTree(it) }
    configurations.runtimeClasspath.collect { it.isDirectory() ? it : zipTree(it) }
  } with jar
  println("Fat jar is created")
}

//Copy dependent libraries to directory.
task copyDepends(type: Copy) {
 from configurations.default
 into "${dependsDir}"
}

//Create runnable jar with dependencies
task createJar(type: Jar) {
 println("Cleaning...")
 clean
 manifest {
    attributes('Main-Class': 'com.abc.gradle.hello.App',
            'Class-Path': configurations.default.collect { 'dependencies/' + 
            it.getName() }.join(' ')
    )
 }
 from {
     configurations.compile.collect { it.isDirectory() ? it : zipTree(it) }
 } with jar
  println "${outputJar} created"
}

Gradle build commands
Create fat jar : gradle fatJar
Copy dependencies : gradle copyDepends
Create runnable jar with dependencies : gradle createJar

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