225

How to disable logging on the standard error stream in Python? This does not work:

import logging

logger = logging.getLogger()
logger.removeHandler(sys.stderr)
logger.warning('foobar')  # emits 'foobar' on sys.stderr
7
  • For those wondering why anyone would want to disable logging: You wouldn't want to log private data like passwords or API keys.
    – Stevoisiak
    Commented Apr 27, 2018 at 20:01
  • 12
    @StevenVascellaro. Why are those being sent to a logger in the first place then? That doesn't sound right... Commented Jul 13, 2018 at 16:47
  • 2
    @MadPhysicist I have an application which sends XML requests to an external API. By default, these requests are logged to a file. However, the initial login requires authentication with a username and password, which I don't want logged.
    – Stevoisiak
    Commented Jul 13, 2018 at 16:53
  • @StevenVascellaro. I see. Thanks for the explanation. Commented Jul 13, 2018 at 17:17
  • 2
    You do not show how/where you add your handlers. If they were added to the root logger this would prevent logging from adding default StreamHandler as described at docs.python.org/3/library/logging.html#logging.basicConfig Also, per linked description, the default StreamHandler is only added during first call emitting log message so when you print logger.handlers it should be empty (as it precedes logger.debug() call). The code in question displays only [] (empty list of handlers). Verified with Python 2.7.15 and Python 3.6.6. Commented Aug 22, 2018 at 10:07

22 Answers 22

246

I found a solution for this:

logger = logging.getLogger('my-logger')
logger.propagate = False
# now if you use logger it will not log to console.

This will prevent logging from being sent to the upper logger that includes the console logging.

7
  • 20
    I don't think this is a good solution. Not propagating to higher loggers could have other undesirable consequences.
    – lfk
    Commented Aug 31, 2017 at 6:20
  • 6
    If you wanted to only filter message below a certain log level (say, all INFO messages), you could change the second line to something like logger.setLevel(logging.WARNING) Commented Jan 5, 2018 at 16:48
  • 2
    How would you re-enable the log afterwards?
    – Stevoisiak
    Commented Apr 27, 2018 at 19:57
  • 15
    Not an answer as blocking propagation effectively disables all handlers of the root logger and the question clearly states (…) but I may have other handlers there that I want to keep which suggests the intention is to disable default StreamHandler of the root logger only. Commented Aug 22, 2018 at 7:51
  • 3
    Stopping message propagation is not enough. Since Python 3.2, the logging.lastResort handler will still log messages of severity logging.WARNING and greater to sys.stderr in the absence of other handlers. See my answer.
    – Géry Ogam
    Commented Apr 20, 2020 at 22:34
156

I use:

logger = logging.getLogger()
logger.disabled = True
... whatever you want ...
logger.disabled = False
5
  • 21
    this also works at the logging module level to disable logging entirely, for example: import logging; logging.disable(logging.CRITICAL);: docs.python.org/2/library/logging.html#logging.disable
    – lsh
    Commented May 9, 2016 at 15:35
  • 1
    This is much better than disabling propagation. Commented Aug 17, 2018 at 12:38
  • 15
    Not an answer – the question asks how to disable default StreamHandler only. Commented Aug 22, 2018 at 7:29
  • 1
    The disabled attribute is not part of the public API. See bugs.python.org/issue36318.
    – Géry Ogam
    Commented Mar 28, 2019 at 11:59
  • should this be enclosed in try / finally ? What happens if the code rises one exception ? Does the logger remain disabled ?
    – yucer
    Commented Nov 25, 2020 at 9:23
84

You can use:

logging.basicConfig(level=your_level)

where your_level is one of those:

'debug': logging.DEBUG,
'info': logging.INFO,
'warning': logging.WARNING,
'error': logging.ERROR,
'critical': logging.CRITICAL

So, if you set your_level to logging.CRITICAL, you will get only critical messages sent by:

logging.critical('This is a critical error message')

Setting your_level to logging.DEBUG will show all levels of logging.

For more details, please take a look at logging examples.

In the same manner to change level for each Handler use Handler.setLevel() function.

import logging
import logging.handlers

LOG_FILENAME = '/tmp/logging_rotatingfile_example.out'

# Set up a specific logger with our desired output level
my_logger = logging.getLogger('MyLogger')
my_logger.setLevel(logging.DEBUG)

# Add the log message handler to the logger
handler = logging.handlers.RotatingFileHandler(
          LOG_FILENAME, maxBytes=20, backupCount=5)

handler.setLevel(logging.CRITICAL)

my_logger.addHandler(handler)
5
  • 9
    This is generally useful info, but the question asked how t o disable console logging, not how to add an additional handler. if you were to examine my_logger.handlers with the above code applied to the original example, you'd see two handlers -- your new file handler and the original stream handler.
    – Joe
    Commented Jul 12, 2017 at 18:07
  • 1
    CRITICAL was the word I was looking for. Thanks.
    – Nishant
    Commented Apr 29, 2019 at 12:59
  • 1
    I would love to see a debug level of OFF. It is unambiguous and simple. Commented Aug 21, 2019 at 19:53
  • 2
    logging.CRITICAL+1
    – Piotr
    Commented Dec 20, 2021 at 17:00
  • This does not address the question. They want to know how to disable it, which means the level can still be set. Commented Feb 6 at 14:13
60

Using Context manager - [ most simple ]

import logging 

class DisableLogger():
    def __enter__(self):
       logging.disable(logging.CRITICAL)
    def __exit__(self, exit_type, exit_value, exit_traceback):
       logging.disable(logging.NOTSET)

Example of use:

with DisableLogger():
    do_something()

If you need a [more COMPLEX] fine-grained solution you can look at AdvancedLogger

5
  • I really like this idiom, but I would rather be able to disable a particular namespace. For example, I just want the root logger temporarily disabled. Although using this idiom, we should be able to just temporarily add/remove handlers and the such.
    – Chris
    Commented Feb 12, 2014 at 18:21
  • 3
    The question asks how to disable default StreamHandler only. Commented Aug 21, 2018 at 14:06
  • 1
    You don’t need to roll your own class, you can use @contextmanager from contextlib and write a yielding function
    – KristianR
    Commented Oct 24, 2018 at 23:24
  • 2
    If you are into exotic fruits on your pizza. Sure. Commented Apr 27, 2019 at 22:55
  • @PiotrDobrogost i have added a link to AdvancedLogger which allows to temporary disable output to console (StreamHandler)
    – pymen
    Commented Aug 16, 2020 at 21:37
50

(long dead question, but for future searchers)

Closer to the original poster's code/intent, this works for me under python 2.6

#!/usr/bin/python
import logging

logger = logging.getLogger() # this gets the root logger

lhStdout = logger.handlers[0]  # stdout is the only handler initially

# ... here I add my own handlers 
f = open("/tmp/debug","w")          # example handler
lh = logging.StreamHandler(f)
logger.addHandler(lh)

logger.removeHandler(lhStdout)

logger.debug("bla bla")

The gotcha I had to work out was to remove the stdout handler after adding a new one; the logger code appears to automatically re-add the stdout if no handlers are present.

IndexOutOfBound Fix: If you get a IndexOutOfBound Error while instantiating lhStdout, move the instantiation to after adding your file handler i.e.

...
logger.addHandler(lh)

lhStdout = logger.handlers[0]
logger.removeHandler(lhStdout)
1
  • 4
    The sequence logger = logging.getLogger(); lhStdout = logger.handlers[0] is wrong as the root logger initially has no handlers – python -c "import logging; assert not logging.getLogger().handlers". Verified with Python 2.7.15 and Python 3.6.6. Commented Aug 21, 2018 at 14:31
46

To fully disable logging:

logging.disable(sys.maxint) # Python 2

logging.disable(sys.maxsize) # Python 3

To enable logging:

logging.disable(logging.NOTSET)

Other answers provide work arounds which don't fully solve the problem, such as

logging.getLogger().disabled = True

and, for some n greater than 50,

logging.disable(n)

The problem with the first solution is that it only works for the root logger. Other loggers created using, say, logging.getLogger(__name__) are not disabled by this method.

The second solution does affect all logs. But it limits output to levels above that given, so one could override it by logging with a level greater than 50.

That can be prevented by

logging.disable(sys.maxint)

which as far as I can tell (after reviewing the source) is the only way to fully disable logging.

2
28

There are some really nice answers here, but apparently the simplest is not taken too much in consideration (only from infinito).

root_logger = logging.getLogger()
root_logger.disabled = True

This disables the root logger, and thus all the other loggers. I haven't really tested but it should be also the fastest.

From the logging code in python 2.7 I see this

def handle(self, record):
    """
    Call the handlers for the specified record.

    This method is used for unpickled records received from a socket, as
    well as those created locally. Logger-level filtering is applied.
    """
    if (not self.disabled) and self.filter(record):
        self.callHandlers(record)

Which means that when it's disabled no handler is called, and it should be more efficient that filtering to a very high value or setting a no-op handler for example.

4
  • 1
    Unless I am doing something wrong, this only disables the root logger and not any created like log = logging.getLogger(__name__)
    – starfry
    Commented May 21, 2017 at 16:03
  • 2
    This could be problematic if you're dealing with multiple loggers or multiple handlers. If, for example, you still want to log to a file but want to disable the stream handler in a specific case.
    – Joe
    Commented Jul 12, 2017 at 18:10
  • 2
    This disables the root logger, and thus all the other loggers – strictly speaking disabling the root logger does not disable any other loggers. Besides the question asks about disabling default StreamHandler only. Commented Aug 21, 2018 at 14:03
  • 1
    The disabled attribute is not part of the public API. See bugs.python.org/issue36318.
    – Géry Ogam
    Commented Mar 28, 2019 at 12:00
23

Logging has the following structure:

  • loggers are arranged according to a namespace hierarchy with dot separators;
  • each logger has a level (logging.WARNING by default for the root logger and logging.NOTSET by default for non-root loggers) and an effective level (the first level of the logger and its ancestors different from logging.NOTSET, logging.NOTSET otherwise);
  • each logger has a list of filters;
  • each logger has a list of handlers;
  • each handler has a level (logging.NOTSET by default);
  • each handler has a list of filters.

Logging has the following process (represented by a flowchart):

Logging flow.

Therefore to disable a particular logger you can adopt one of the following strategies:

  1. Set the level of the logger to logging.CRITICAL + 1.

    • Using the main API:

      import logging
      
      logger = logging.getLogger("foo")
      logger.setLevel(logging.CRITICAL + 1)
      
    • Using the config API:

      import logging.config
      
      logging.config.dictConfig({
          "version": 1,
          "loggers": {
              "foo": {
                  "level": logging.CRITICAL + 1
              }
          }
      })
      
  2. Add a filter lambda record: False to the logger.

    • Using the main API:

      import logging
      
      logger = logging.getLogger("foo")
      logger.addFilter(lambda record: False)
      
    • Using the config API:

      import logging.config
      
      logging.config.dictConfig({
          "version": 1,
          "filters": {
              "all": {
                  "()": lambda: (lambda record: False)
              }
          },
          "loggers": {
              "foo": {
                  "filters": ["all"]
              }
          }
      })
      
  3. Remove the existing handlers of the logger, add a logging.NullHandler() handler to the logger (to prevent records from being passed to the logging.lastResort handler when no handler is found in the logger and its ancestors, which is a logging.StreamHandler handler with a logging.WARNING level that emits to the sys.stderr stream) and set the propagate attribute of the logger to False (to prevent records from being passed to the handlers of the logger’s ancestors).

    • Using the main API:

      import logging
      
      logger = logging.getLogger("foo")
      for handler in logger.handlers.copy():
          try:
              logger.removeHandler(handler)
          except ValueError:  # in case another thread has already removed it
              pass
      logger.addHandler(logging.NullHandler())
      logger.propagate = False
      
    • Using the config API:

      import logging.config
      
      logging.config.dictConfig({
          "version": 1,
          "handlers": {
              "null": {
                  "class": "logging.NullHandler"
              }
          },
          "loggers": {
              "foo": {
                  "handlers": ["null"],
                  "propagate": False
              }
          }
      })
      

Warning. — Contrary to strategies 1 and 2 which only prevent records logged by the logger (e.g. logging.getLogger("foo")) from being emitted by the handlers of the logger and its ancestors, strategy 3 also prevents records logged by the descendants of the logger (e.g. logging.getLogger("foo.bar")) to be emitted by the handlers of the logger and its ancestors.

Note. — Setting the disabled attribute of the logger to True is not yet another strategy, as it is not part of the public API (cf. https://bugs.python.org/issue36318):

import logging

logger = logging.getLogger("foo")
logger.disabled = True  # DO NOT DO THIS
9
  • Excellent, but the question also asked how to re-enable it? For example, would you do a removeFilter and how? Commented Aug 29, 2020 at 19:53
  • 1
    @NealWalters For the 1st solution, you would create a handler: handler = logging.NullHandler(), add it to the logger and disable propagation to disable logging: logger.addHandler(handler); logger.propagate = False, and remove it from the logger and re-enable propagation to re-enable logging: logger.removeHandler(handler); logger.propagate = True. For the 2nd solution, you would create a filter: def filter(record): return False, add it to the logger to disable logging: logger.addFilter(filter), and remove it from the logger to re-enable logging: logger.removeFilter(filter).
    – Géry Ogam
    Commented Aug 29, 2020 at 21:26
  • This does not do what the questioner wants: stop the logging to console (stdout/stderr). Even if you just have a root logger (or non-root logger) with ZERO handlers, these STILL output to console. Commented Jun 18, 2023 at 8:09
  • @mikerodent It does disable logging for a specific logger ("foo" in the solutions). If you want to disable logging for any logger, use the same solutions but on the root logger.
    – Géry Ogam
    Commented Jun 18, 2023 at 16:22
  • @GéryOgam This is not what the OP asked about. Please reread the question. He wants to suppress console output. You have answered another question. You need to reread the question and then probably have a look at my answer. Commented Jun 18, 2023 at 17:08
11

No need to divert stdout. Here is better way to do it:

import logging
class MyLogHandler(logging.Handler):
    def emit(self, record):
        pass

logging.getLogger().addHandler(MyLogHandler())

An even simpler way is:

logging.getLogger().setLevel(100)
2
  • 5
    In Python 2.7+ this is available as NullHandler()
    – Pierre
    Commented May 20, 2014 at 17:19
  • 2
    The reason why this works (disables default StreamHandler) can be seen when reading description of logging.basicConfig() function (emphasis mine): Does basic configuration for the logging system by creating a StreamHandler with a default Formatter and adding it to the root logger. The functions debug(), info(), warning(), error() and critical() will call basicConfig() automatically if no handlers are defined for the root logger.docs.python.org/3/library/logging.html#logging.basicConfig Commented Aug 21, 2018 at 13:42
3

The answers here are confused. The OP could hardly be clearer: he wants to stop output to the console for a given logger. In his example, this is actually the root logger, but for most purposes this won't be the case. This is not about disabling handlers, or whatever. Nor about changing from stderr to stdout.

The confusing truth is that a non-root logger with ZERO handlers where the root logger also has ZERO handlers will still output to console (stderr rather than stdout). Try this:

import logging

root_logger = logging.getLogger()

root_logger.warning('root warning')
my_logger = logging.getLogger('whatever')
my_logger.warning('whatever warning')

# handlers situation?
my_logger.warning(f'len(root_logger.handlers) {len(root_logger.handlers)}, len(my_logger.handlers) {len(my_logger.handlers)}')
# ... BOTH ZERO 

# is the parent of my_logger root_logger?
my_logger.warning(f'my_logger.parent == root_logger? {my_logger.parent == root_logger}')
# yes indeed

# what happens if we add a (non-console) handler to my_logger?
my_logger.addHandler(logging.FileHandler('output.txt'))
# ... for example. Another example would be my_logger.addHandler(logging.NullHandler())

# solution 2, see below:
# root_logger.addHandler(logging.FileHandler('output.txt'))

# solution 3, see below:
# logging.lastResort = logging.NullHandler()

# failure, see below:
# my_logger.propagate = False

root_logger.warning('root warning 2')
# success: this is output to the file but NOT to console:
my_logger.warning('whatever warning 2') 

I looked at the source code*. When the framework discovers that a Logger has no handlers it behaves in a funny way. In this case the logging framework will simply use a lastResort handler with any logger where it is found to have no handlers (including any from its parent or higher loggers). lastResort.stream() outputs to sys.stderr.

A first solution, therefore, is to give your non-root logger a non-console handler such as FileHandler (NB not all StreamHandlers necessarily output to console!)...

A second solution (for the simple example above) is to stop this lastResort output by giving your root logger a handler which does not output to console. In this case it is not necessary to stop propagation, my_logger.propagate = False. If there is a complex hierarchy of loggers, of course, you may have to follow the path of propagation upwards to identify any loggers with handlers outputting to console.

A third solution would be to substitute logging.lastResort:

logging.lastResort = logging.NullHandler()

Again, in a complex hierarchy, there may be handlers in higher loggers outputting to console.

NB just setting my_logger.propagate = False is NOT sufficient: in that case the framework will see that my_logger has no handlers, and call upon lastResort: try it in the above snippet.

NB2 if you did want to suppress console output for the root logger, solutions 2) or 3) would work. But they wouldn't suppress console output for other loggers, necessarily. (NB usually they would because parent ... parent ... parent almost always leads to the root logger. But conceivably you might want to set a logger's parent to None).
It's necessary to understand the mechanism, and then to rationalise. Once you understand the mechanism it's really quite easy.


* Source code (NB Python 3.10) is not in fact that difficult to follow. If you look at method Logger._log (where all messages get sent) this ends with self.handle(record), which calls self.callHandlers(record) which counts the number of handlers found, including by climbing upwards using Logger.parent, examining the handlers of ancestor loggers ... and then:

if (found == 0):
    if lastResort:
        if record.levelno >= lastResort.level:
            lastResort.handle(record)
    elif raiseExceptions and not self.manager.emittedNoHandlerWarning:
        sys.stderr.write("No handlers could be found for logger"
                         " \"%s\"\n" % self.name)
        self.manager.emittedNoHandlerWarning = True

This lastResort is itself a StreamHandler, which outputs to sys.stderr in method stream.

3
  • +1 for setting the logging.lastResort handler to logging.NullHandler(). For the other solutions why don’t you add the same handler instead of logging.FileHandler('output.txt')?
    – Géry Ogam
    Commented Jun 18, 2023 at 19:13
  • At your suggestion I added that possibility. The thing about a FileHandler though is that it leaves some evidence that logging has actually taken place, which is helpful I think. Commented Jun 18, 2023 at 19:41
  • Yes logging.FileHandler might be helpful, so you can also use it for the logging.lastResort solution for consistency.
    – Géry Ogam
    Commented Jun 18, 2023 at 19:50
2

This will prevent all logging from a third library which it used as decribed here https://docs.python.org/3/howto/logging.html#configuring-logging-for-a-library

logging.getLogger('somelogger').addHandler(logging.NullHandler())
2

Considering you have created your own handlers, then right before you add them to the logger, you can do:

logger.removeHandler(logger.handlers[0])

Which will remove the default StreamHandler. This worked for me on Python 3.8 after encountering unwanted emitting of logs to stderr, when they should have been only recorded onto a file.

2

It is not 100% solution, but none of the answers here solved my issue. I have custom logging module which outputs colored text according to severity. I needed to disable stdout output since it was duplicating my logs. I'm OK with critical logs being outputted to console since I almost don't use it. I didn't test it for stderr since I don't use it in my logging, but should work same way as stdout. It sets CRITICAL as minimal severity just for stdout (stderr if requested).

logger = logging.getLogger()
logger.setLevel(logging.DEBUG)

# disable terminal output - it is handled by this module
stdout_handler = logging.StreamHandler(sys.stdout)

# set terminal output to critical only - won't output lower levels
stdout_handler.setLevel(logging.CRITICAL)

# add adjusted stream handler
logger.addHandler(stdout_handler)
1
import logging

log_file = 'test.log'
info_format = '%(asctime)s - %(levelname)s - %(message)s'
logging.config.dictConfig({
    'version': 1,
    'disable_existing_loggers': False,
    'formatters': {
        'info_format': {
            'format': info_format
        },
    },
    'handlers': {
        'console': {
            'level': 'INFO',
            'class': 'logging.StreamHandler',
            'formatter': 'info_format'
        },
        'info_log_file': {
            'class': 'logging.handlers.RotatingFileHandler',
            'level': 'INFO',
            'filename': log_file,
            'formatter': 'info_format'
        }
    },
    'loggers': {
        '': {
            'handlers': [
                'console',
                'info_log_file'
            ],
            'level': 'INFO'
        }
    }
})


class A:

    def __init__(self):
        logging.info('object created of class A')

        self.logger = logging.getLogger()
        self.console_handler = None

    def say(self, word):
        logging.info('A object says: {}'.format(word))

    def disable_console_log(self):
        if self.console_handler is not None:
            # Console log has already been disabled
            return

        for handler in self.logger.handlers:
            if type(handler) is logging.StreamHandler:
                self.console_handler = handler
                self.logger.removeHandler(handler)

    def enable_console_log(self):
        if self.console_handler is None:
            # Console log has already been enabled
            return

        self.logger.addHandler(self.console_handler)
        self.console_handler = None


if __name__ == '__main__':
    a = A()
    a.say('111')
    a.disable_console_log()
    a.say('222')
    a.enable_console_log()
    a.say('333')

Console output:

2018-09-15 15:22:23,354 - INFO - object created of class A
2018-09-15 15:22:23,356 - INFO - A object says: 111
2018-09-15 15:22:23,358 - INFO - A object says: 333

test.log file content:

2018-09-15 15:22:23,354 - INFO - object created of class A
2018-09-15 15:22:23,356 - INFO - A object says: 111
2018-09-15 15:22:23,357 - INFO - A object says: 222
2018-09-15 15:22:23,358 - INFO - A object says: 333
1
  • 2
    Add some description about the code. It would help much better Commented Sep 15, 2018 at 7:45
1

The reason is all loggers you create with

my_logger = logging.getLogger('some-logger')

have a parent field/attribute set to the root logger (which is the logger you get with:

root_logger = logging.getLogger()

when you call

my_logger.debug('something')

It will call all the handlers of your logger, and also, the handlers of the parent logger of your logger (in a recursive manner). And so, in few words it will call the root logger which will print in the std.err. How do you solve it? two solutions, global:

root_logger = logging.getLogger()
# Remove the handler of root_logger making the root_logger useless
# Any logger you create now will have parent logger as root_logger but
# root_logger has been muted now as it does not have any handler to be called
root_logger.removeHandler(root_logger.handlers[0])

My preferred solution is to mute root logger only for my logger:

my_logger = logging.getLogger('some-logger')
my_logger.parent = None

This is the code that gets called when you call .info, .debug, etc: https://github.com/python/cpython/blob/44bd3fe570da9115bec67694404b8da26716a1d7/Lib/logging/init.py#L1758

notice how it goes through all handlers of your logger, and parents loggers too. Line 1766 it uses the parent.

0
0

I don't know the logging module very well, but I'm using it in the way that I usually want to disable only debug (or info) messages. You can use Handler.setLevel() to set the logging level to CRITICAL or higher.

Also, you could replace sys.stderr and sys.stdout by a file open for writing. See http://docs.python.org/library/sys.html#sys.stdout. But I wouldn't recommend that.

1
  • This could work if logger.handlers would be contain something, currently is [].
    – sorin
    Commented Feb 15, 2010 at 15:58
0

You could also:

handlers = app.logger.handlers
# detach console handler
app.logger.handlers = []
# attach
app.logger.handlers = handlers
1
  • Why are you using app.logger which you don't even specify instead of the root logger explicitly mentioned in the question (logging.getLogger()) and most answers? How do you know you can safely modify handlers property instead of calling Logger.addHandler method? Commented Aug 21, 2018 at 13:58
0

By changing one level in the "logging.config.dictConfig" you'll be able to take the whole logging level to a new level.

logging.config.dictConfig({
'version': 1,
'disable_existing_loggers': False,
'formatters': {
    'console': {
        'format': '%(name)-12s %(levelname)-8s %(message)s'
    },
    'file': {
        'format': '%(asctime)s %(name)-12s %(levelname)-8s %(message)s'
    }
},
'handlers': {
    'console': {
        'class': 'logging.StreamHandler',
        'formatter': 'console'
    },
#CHANGE below level from DEBUG to THE_LEVEL_YOU_WANT_TO_SWITCH_FOR
#if we jump from DEBUG to INFO
# we won't be able to see the DEBUG logs in our logging.log file
    'file': {
        'level': 'DEBUG',
        'class': 'logging.FileHandler',
        'formatter': 'file',
        'filename': 'logging.log'
    },
},
'loggers': {
    '': {
        'level': 'DEBUG',
        'handlers': ['console', 'file'],
        'propagate': False,
    },
}

})

0

Found an elegant solution using decorators, which addresses the following problem: what if you are writing a module with several functions, each of them with several debugging messages, and you want to disable logging in all functions but the one you are currently focusing on?

You can do it using decorators:

import logging, sys
logger = logging.getLogger()
logging.basicConfig(stream=sys.stderr, level=logging.DEBUG)


def disable_debug_messages(func):
    def wrapper(*args, **kwargs):
        prev_state = logger.disabled
        logger.disabled = True
        result = func(*args, **kwargs)
        logger.disabled = prev_state
        return result
    return wrapper

Then, you can do:

@disable_debug_messages
def function_already_debugged():
    ...
    logger.debug("This message won't be showed because of the decorator")
    ...

def function_being_focused():
    ...
    logger.debug("This message will be showed")
    ...

Even if you call function_already_debugged from within function_being_focused, debug messages from function_already_debugged won't be showed. This ensures you will see only the debug messages from the function you are focusing on.

Hope it helps!

0

You can change the level of debug mode for specific handler instead of completely disable it.

So if you have a case you want to stop the debug mode for console only but you still need to keep the other levels like the Error. you can do this like the following

# create logger
logger = logging.getLogger(__name__)

def enableConsoleDebug (debug = False):
    #Set level to logging.DEBUG to see CRITICAL, ERROR, WARNING, INFO and DEBUG statements
    #Set level to logging.ERROR to see the CRITICAL & ERROR statements only
    logger.setLevel(logging.DEBUG)

    debugLevel = logging.ERROR
    if debug:
        debugLevel = logging.DEBUG

    for handler in logger.handlers:
        if type(handler) is logging.StreamHandler:
            handler.setLevel (debugLevel)

0

Yet another way of doing this (at least in Python 3, I didn't check Python 2), is to first create your FileHandler and then call the basicConfig method, like this:

import logging

template_name = "testing"
fh = logging.FileHandler(filename="testing.log")
logger = logging.getLogger(template_name)
logging.basicConfig(
    format="%(asctime)s,%(msecs)d %(name)s %(levelname)s %(message)s",
    level=logging.INFO,
    handlers=[fh],
)
logger.info("Test")
-2

subclass the handler you want to be able to disable temporarily:

class ToggledHandler(logging.StreamHandler):
"""A handler one can turn on and off"""

def __init__(self, args, kwargs):
    super(ToggledHandler, self).__init__(*args, **kwargs)
    self.enabled = True  # enabled by default

def enable(self):
    """enables"""
    self.enabled = True

def disable(self):
    """disables"""
    self.enabled = False

def emit(self, record):
    """emits, if enabled"""
    if self.enabled:
        # this is taken from the super's emit, implement your own
        try:
            msg = self.format(record)
            stream = self.stream
            stream.write(msg)
            stream.write(self.terminator)
            self.flush()
        except Exception:
            self.handleError(record)

finding the handler by name is quite easy:

_handler = [x for x in logging.getLogger('').handlers if x.name == your_handler_name]
if len(_handler) == 1:
    _handler = _handler[0]
else:
    raise Exception('Expected one handler but found {}'.format(len(_handler))

once found:

_handler.disable()
doStuff()
_handler.enable()

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