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When I look at the assembly generated by gcc or icc there's a ton of pseudo-ops. Do they all do something?

Here's the example that raised the question. I have two simple C++ files. One calls a function and the other does it.

call.cpp:

#include <iostream>

void vadd(float* __restrict__ A, float* __restrict__ B, float* __restrict__ C);

int main(int argc, char* argv[]) {

    constexpr const size_t size      = 16;
    constexpr const size_t alignment = 16;

    float* A;
    posix_memalign((void**)&A, alignment, sizeof(float)*size);

    A[ 0] =  0;
    A[ 1] =  1;
    A[ 2] =  2;
    A[ 3] =  3;
    A[ 4] =  4;
    A[ 5] =  5;
    A[ 6] =  6;
    A[ 7] =  7;
    A[ 8] =  8;
    A[ 9] =  9;
    A[10] = 10;
    A[11] = 11;
    A[12] = 12;
    A[13] = 13;
    A[14] = 14;
    A[15] = 15;

    float* B;
    posix_memalign((void**)&B, alignment, sizeof(float)*size);

    B[ 0] =   0;
    B[ 1] =  10;
    B[ 2] =  20;
    B[ 3] =  30;
    B[ 4] =  40;
    B[ 5] =  50;
    B[ 6] =  60;
    B[ 7] =  70;
    B[ 8] =  80;
    B[ 9] =  90;
    B[10] = 100;
    B[11] = 110;
    B[12] = 120;
    B[13] = 130;
    B[14] = 140;
    B[15] = 150;

    float* C;
    posix_memalign((void**)&C, alignment, sizeof(float)*size);

    vadd(A, B, C);
    for (int i=0; i<(size-1); i++) {std::cout << C[i] << " ";}
    std::cout << C[(size-1)] << std::endl;
}

do.cpp:

void vadd(float* __restrict__ A, float* __restrict__ B, float* __restrict__ C) {
    C[ 0] = A[ 0] + B[ 0];
    C[ 1] = A[ 1] + B[ 1];
    C[ 2] = A[ 2] + B[ 2];
    C[ 3] = A[ 3] + B[ 3];
    C[ 4] = A[ 4] + B[ 4];
    C[ 5] = A[ 5] + B[ 5];
    C[ 6] = A[ 6] + B[ 6];
    C[ 7] = A[ 7] + B[ 7];
    C[ 8] = A[ 8] + B[ 8];
    C[ 9] = A[ 9] + B[ 9];
    C[10] = A[10] + B[10];
    C[11] = A[11] + B[11];
    C[12] = A[12] + B[12];
    C[13] = A[13] + B[13];
    C[14] = A[14] + B[14];
    C[15] = A[15] + B[15];
}

When I compile with icc and inspect the output for do.cpp, I see tons of pseudo-ops accompanying the assembly. This example is very mild compared to other files I've looked at that contain far more pseudo-ops than opcodes, often hundreds of lines of .byte ops.

L_TXTST0:
# -- Begin  __Z4vaddPfS_S_
# mark_begin;
       .align    4
    .globl __Z4vaddPfS_S_
__Z4vaddPfS_S_:
# parameter 1: %rdi
# parameter 2: %rsi
# parameter 3: %rdx
L_B1.1:                         # Preds L_B1.0
L____tag_value___Z4vaddPfS_S_.1:                                #1.80
        movups    (%rdi), %xmm1                                 #2.10
        movups    16(%rdi), %xmm3                               #2.10
        movups    32(%rdi), %xmm5                               #2.10
        movups    48(%rdi), %xmm7                               #2.10
        movups    (%rsi), %xmm0                                 #2.18
        movups    16(%rsi), %xmm2                               #2.18
        movups    32(%rsi), %xmm4                               #2.18
        movups    48(%rsi), %xmm6                               #2.18
        addps     %xmm0, %xmm1                                  #2.18
        addps     %xmm2, %xmm3                                  #2.18
        addps     %xmm4, %xmm5                                  #2.18
        addps     %xmm6, %xmm7                                  #2.18
        movups    %xmm1, (%rdx)                                 #2.2
        movups    %xmm3, 16(%rdx)                               #2.2
        movups    %xmm5, 32(%rdx)                               #2.2
        movups    %xmm7, 48(%rdx)                               #2.2
        ret                                                     #18.1
        .align    4
L____tag_value___Z4vaddPfS_S_.3:                                #
                                # LOE
# mark_end;
    .section    __DATA, __data
# -- End  __Z4vaddPfS_S_
    .section    __DATA, __data
    .globl __Z4vaddPfS_S_.eh
// -- Begin SEGMENT __eh_frame
    .section __TEXT,__eh_frame,coalesced,no_toc+strip_static_syms+live_support
__eh_frame_seg:
L.__eh_frame_seg:
EH_frame0:
L_fde_cie_0:
    .long 0x0000001c
    .long 0x00000000
    .long 0x52507a01
    .long 0x10780100
    .short 0x9b06
    .long ___gxx_personality_v0@GOTPCREL+0x4
    .long 0x08070c10
    .long 0x01900190
    .short 0x0000
__Z4vaddPfS_S_.eh:
    .long 0x0000001c
    .long 0x00000024
    .quad L____tag_value___Z4vaddPfS_S_.1-__Z4vaddPfS_S_.eh-0x8
    .set L_Qlab1,L____tag_value___Z4vaddPfS_S_.3-L____tag_value___Z4vaddPfS_S_.1
    .quad L_Qlab1
    .long 0x00000000
    .long 0x00000000
# End
    .subsections_via_symbols

However, most of these pseudo-ops can be removed and the program seems to run just fine. Here's a stripped down version of the assembly from do.cpp that I can successfully link and run:

    .text
    .align    4
    .globl __Z4vaddPfS_S_
__Z4vaddPfS_S_:
    movups    (%rdi), %xmm1
    movups    16(%rdi), %xmm3
    movups    32(%rdi), %xmm5
    movups    48(%rdi), %xmm7
    movups    (%rsi), %xmm0
    movups    16(%rsi), %xmm2
    movups    32(%rsi), %xmm4
    movups    48(%rsi), %xmm6
    addps     %xmm0, %xmm1
    addps     %xmm2, %xmm3
    addps     %xmm4, %xmm5
    addps     %xmm6, %xmm7
    movups    %xmm1, (%rdx)
    movups    %xmm3, 16(%rdx)
    movups    %xmm5, 32(%rdx)
    movups    %xmm7, 48(%rdx)
    ret

gcc also generates tons of pseudo-ops but they seem to have a distinct flavor with a different preponderance of instructions. Here's a typical example:

LASFDE3:
    .long   LASFDE3-EH_frame1
    .quad   LFB1402-.
    .set L$set$8,LFE1402-LFB1402
    .quad L$set$8
    .byte   0
    .byte   0x4
    .set L$set$9,LCFI4-LFB1402
    .long L$set$9
    .byte   0xe
    .byte   0x10
    .byte   0x4
    .set L$set$10,LCFI5-LCFI4
    .long L$set$10
    .byte   0xe
    .byte   0x8
    .align 3

I realize this single question is actually hundreds of little questions, each with very specific answers, but what sorts of behind the scenes work are these "extra" instructions doing?

3
  • 1
    Have you looked at the documentation? sourceware.org/binutils/docs/as
    – Cubbi
    Mar 27 '14 at 3:34
  • 3
    They are not instructions, they are data. You can see the reason for it from the identifier name, EH means Exception Handling. Google "GCC unwind tables" to learn more. Mar 27 '14 at 3:50
  • @HansPassant Thanks. How can I figure out what these labels mean in general? Google hasn't been much help. This is on a Mac, I typically compile with gcc, and I have gcc using clang's assembler (because it will compile AVX instructions). Who would be the documenter? Mar 27 '14 at 5:15

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