102

I have an object, lets call it ObjectA, and that object has 10 properties that are all strings.

var myObject = new {Property1="",Property2="",Property3="",Property4="",...}

Is there anyway to check to see whether all these properties are null or empty?

Any built-in method that would return true or false?

If any single of them is not null or empty then the return would be false, and if all of them are empty it should return true.

I'd just like to avoid writing 10 if statements to control for each of the properties being empty or null.

5
  • 4
    Try it with reflection. Commented Mar 27, 2014 at 9:21
  • 1
    Reflection, but ask yourself...Is that data structure a good approach? Seems like myObject is really just an array. Commented Mar 27, 2014 at 9:22
  • 3
    The idea is in the web development that I have a viewmodel(search filters) and when they leave all filters empty the linq statement returns all the result from database. I somehow came up with the idea that if those filters are returned empty from viewmodel it should not apply the filter. But writing 10 if else doesnot sound good at all.
    – akd
    Commented Mar 27, 2014 at 9:25
  • 1
    This question is really confusing and ambiguous. Are you asking to check they are all null? all empty? none are null? none are empty? all are null or empty? none are null or empty?
    – Caltor
    Commented Mar 29, 2022 at 9:34
  • I think you mean whether "any" properties are null or empty...
    – J_L
    Commented Feb 10 at 23:03

11 Answers 11

153

You can do it using Reflection

bool IsAnyNullOrEmpty(object myObject)
{
    foreach(PropertyInfo pi in myObject.GetType().GetProperties())
    {
        if(pi.PropertyType == typeof(string))
        {
            string value = (string)pi.GetValue(myObject);
            if(string.IsNullOrEmpty(value))
            {
                return true;
            }
        }
    }
    return false;
}

Matthew Watson suggested an alternative using LINQ:

return myObject.GetType().GetProperties()
    .Where(pi => pi.PropertyType == typeof(string))
    .Select(pi => (string)pi.GetValue(myObject))
    .Any(value => string.IsNullOrEmpty(value));
3
  • 3
    if you have ID property or something that needs to be excluded you can check: if (pi.Name.Equals("InfoID") || pi.Name.Equals("EmployeeID") || pi.Name.Equals("LastUpdated")) continue; Commented Mar 18, 2015 at 18:07
  • 1
    Would this break for any other property types besides string if they're all nullable?
    – Lukas
    Commented Feb 15, 2021 at 20:36
  • perfect idea with linq
    – M.Kasaei
    Commented Jun 1, 2021 at 18:52
22

I suppose you want to make sure that all properties are filled in.

A better option is probably by putting this validation in the constructor of your class and throw exceptions if validation fails. That way you cannot create a class that is invalid; catch exceptions and handle them accordingly.

Fluent validation is a nice framework (http://fluentvalidation.codeplex.com) for doing the validation. Example:

public class CustomerValidator: AbstractValidator<Customer> 
{
    public CustomerValidator()
    {
        RuleFor(customer => customer.Property1).NotNull();
        RuleFor(customer => customer.Property2).NotNull();
        RuleFor(customer => customer.Property3).NotNull();
    }
}

public class Customer
{
    public Customer(string property1, string property2, string property3)
    {
         Property1  = property1;
         Property2  = property2;
         Property3  = property3;
         new CustomerValidator().ValidateAndThrow();
    }

    public string Property1 {get; set;}
    public string Property2 {get; set;}
    public string Property3 {get; set;}
}

Usage:

 try
 {
     var customer = new Customer("string1", "string", null);
     // logic here
 } catch (ValidationException ex)
 {
     // A validation error occured
 }

PS - Using reflection for this kind of thing just makes your code harder to read. Using validation as shown above makes it explicitly clear what your rules are; and you can easily extend them with other rules.

18

The following code returns if any property is not null.

  return myObject.GetType()
                 .GetProperties() //get all properties on object
                 .Select(pi => pi.GetValue(myObject)) //get value for the property
                 .Any(value => value != null); // Check if one of the values is not null, if so it returns true.
0
12

Here you go

var instOfA = new ObjectA();
bool isAnyPropEmpty = instOfA.GetType().GetProperties()
     .Where(p => p.GetValue(instOfA) is string) // selecting only string props
     .Any(p => string.IsNullOrWhiteSpace((p.GetValue(instOfA) as string)));

and here's the class

class ObjectA
{
    public string A { get; set; }
    public string B { get; set; }
}
6
  • 1
    it says cannot resolve p.GetValue(myObj) in both place?
    – akd
    Commented Mar 27, 2014 at 9:38
  • Try copy-paste my answer. The class itself and then the code and run it again, please. Commented Mar 27, 2014 at 9:48
  • 1
    Please, if you downvote my answer, tell me why. How else could I improve them if I don't know why they are being downvoted. Commented Mar 27, 2014 at 10:02
  • I didnt downvote your answer but your answer doesnt work for me. the object I am talking is something ActionResult SearchResult(MyObjectViewModel myObj) {}
    – akd
    Commented Mar 27, 2014 at 10:16
  • 2
    Edit your questions and add there the exact code you are trying and explain clearly what error are you getting, please. I posted a general answer because you askwed a general question. There's nothing about views and controllers in your question. Commented Mar 27, 2014 at 11:00
6

A slightly different way of expressing the linq to see if all string properties of an object are non null and non empty:

public static bool AllStringPropertyValuesAreNonEmpty(object myObject)
{
    var allStringPropertyValues = 
        from   property in myObject.GetType().GetProperties()
        where  property.PropertyType == typeof(string) && property.CanRead
        select (string) property.GetValue(myObject);

    return allStringPropertyValues.All(value => !string.IsNullOrEmpty(value));
}
4
  • this works, but suppose object has property ID , can i get ID's whose properties are null or empty ?
    – Shaiju T
    Commented Dec 21, 2016 at 11:52
  • @stom You could add filters to check the Name and the value. Commented Dec 22, 2016 at 7:32
  • Thanks, i didn't understand what filters you mean, but i will do some research.
    – Shaiju T
    Commented Dec 24, 2016 at 10:18
  • remeber to give property get; set; or the GetProperties will not work, see stackoverflow.com/questions/7838189/… Commented Apr 7, 2017 at 7:52
3

Note if you've got a data structural hierarchy and you want to test everything in that hierarchy, then you can use a recursive method. Here's a quick example:

static bool AnyNullOrEmpty(object obj) {
  return obj == null
      || obj.ToString() == ""
      || obj.GetType().GetProperties().Any(prop => AnyNullOrEmpty(prop.GetValue(obj)));
}
3

To only check if all properties are null:

bool allPropertiesNull = !myObject.GetType().GetProperties().Any(prop => prop == null);
1
  • 1
    This actually tells you if all of the properties are not null.
    – Caltor
    Commented Mar 29, 2022 at 9:24
2

you can use reflection and extension methods to do this.

using System.Reflection;
public static class ExtensionMethods
{
    public static bool StringPropertiesEmpty(this object value)
    {
        foreach (PropertyInfo objProp in value.GetType().GetProperties())
        {
            if (objProp.CanRead)
            {
                object val = objProp.GetValue(value, null);
                if (val.GetType() == typeof(string))
                {
                    if (val == "" || val == null)
                    {
                        return true;
                    }
                }
            }
        }
        return false;
    }
}

then use it on any object with string properties

test obj = new test();
if (obj.StringPropertiesEmpty() == true)
{
    // some of these string properties are empty or null
}
0

No, I don't think there is a method to do exactly that.

You'd be best writing a simple method that takes your object and returns true or false.

Alternatively, if the properties are all the same, and you just want to parse through them and find a single null or empty, perhaps some sort of collection of strings would work for you?

0
0

You can try the following query :

if the object is "referenceKey" (where few properties may be null )

referenceKey.GetType().GetProperties().Where(x => x.GetValue(referenceKey) == null)

I need to count the properties where the value is set to not Null, so I have used the following query :

 var countProvidedReferenceKeys = referenceKey.GetType().GetProperties().Where(x => x.GetValue(referenceKey) != null).Count();
0

In my case all properties where nullable and had to check if all null, so I did the count compare, created this extension method:

public static bool IsObjectNull(this object obj)
{
  return obj.GetType().GetProperties().Count() == obj.GetType().GetProperties().Where(x => x.GetValue(obj) == null).Count();
}

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