1

I have an advanced function

function Start-Executable {
    [CmdletBinding()]
    Param (
        [String]$Arg1,
        [String[]]$Arg2,
        [Parameter(ValueFromPipeline=$true)][String[]]$PipeValue
    )

Begin {
    # Setup code
}
Process {
    # What goes on here?
    foreach ($val in $PipeValue) {
        # Process val here
    }
}
End {
}
}

In my setup code, I need to do something different depending on whether the user supplied pipeline input. But I don't know how I can tell in my BEGIN block if there's pipeline input. Is there something I can check for that?

One other thing I tried was putting the setup code in the PROCESS block, before the loop over $PipeValue, but that doesn't work because it appears that the PROCESS block is called once for each pipeline value, with $PipeValue being an array of one item each time. Is that right? If PROCESS is being called repeatedly for each value, why do I need another loop inside the PROCESS block?

Update

To clarify, what I'm trying to do is create a process in BEGIN, feed it input in PROCESS and read the output in END. For this to work I need to set RedirectStandardInput to $true if there is pipeline input, but not otherwise.

As workarounds, I can either make the user specify with an extra argument (and if they get it wrong, things don't work) or I can set a $first_time flag in BEGIN, then create the process the first time PROCESS is called. If I get to END without having created the process, I create it there with RedirectStandardInput as $false. That's more code duplication than I like, but if it's the only option I may have to do it that way.

3

The Begin block runs before the pipeline is started, so there's no way for that code to know what's in the pipeline.

As far as needing another loop inside the Process block, you have to have that if the function needs to accept whatever $PipeValue is as either pipeline input or passed as a parameter. If it's only going to accept that as pipeline data, then there's no point in having a parameter for it. Just use $_ inside the process block.

| improve this answer | |
  • Exactly - well designed cmdlets support input via the pipeline or directly as a parameter. It's a little annoying to need the loop in your process block, but it's a better experience for users of the cmdlet. – Jason Shirk Mar 27 '14 at 16:39
  • Usually, yes. To pass data as a parameter, that data must be resident in memory. In some cases a function may be intended for use with a dataset that should only be handled via the pipeline to avoid memory exhaustion. – mjolinor Mar 27 '14 at 16:47
  • OK, thanks. So essentially there's no way to have setup code that depends on whether there's pipeline data. That's a nuisance (I'll edit my post to explain why, too much to add here) but I have a clumsy workaround I can use if I have to. – Paul Moore Mar 28 '14 at 13:26
4

$MyInvocation.ExpectingInput returns true if the function is invoked with pipeline input, and false otherwise.

This works in begin, process, and end blocks. It does not work in dynamicparam in PowerShell 5.1 or lower.

| improve this answer | |
2
function Start-Executable {
    [CmdletBinding()]
    Param (
        [String]$Arg1,
        [String[]]$Arg2,
        [Parameter(ValueFromPipeline=$true, parametersetname="nopipeline")][String[]]$PipeValue
    )

Begin {
    # Setup code
    if($PSCmdlet.ParameterSetName -eq "nopipeline")
    {
        Write-Host "No pipeline input"
    }
    else
    {
        Write-Host "Pipeline input"
    }
}
Process {
    $PipeValue
}
End {
}
}

This seems to do the trick.
Basically, the parameter is assigned to a parameter set.
If the parameter is used, $pscmdlet.ParameterSetName contains "nopipeline".
If using the pipeline, then $pscmdlet.ParameterSetName contains "__AllParameterSets"

Sample output:

PS H:\> @("a","b","c") | Start-Executable
Pipeline input
a
b
c

PS H:\> Start-Executable -PipeValue @("a","b","c")
No pipeline input
a
b
c

Edit: Note that this however won't tell you that there is pipeline input. It will tell you whether the named parameter was used. In other words, this happens:

PS H:\> Start-Executable
Pipeline input
| improve this answer | |
  • But this won't work if I just do Start-Executable without either pipeline input or an argument, presumably? I guess I could put together an even more complicated set of parameters declarations that might work, but it seems like a lot of effort... (BTW, I don't actually want Start-Executable -PipeValue @("a","b","c") to work, although I'm willing to put up with it if I can't avoid it. – Paul Moore Mar 27 '14 at 13:00
  • I actually amended my answer about this, you're right :) If you don't need "-Pipevalue" to work, why not go with mjolinor's answer, and remove the parameter altogether? – Poorkenny Mar 27 '14 at 13:04

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