5

I am trying find an efficient way of creating a list of dates only including the first day of the month for a given period. Something like this but better:

import datetime
dates = [
  datetime.date (2014, 4, 1),
  datetime.date (2014, 5, 1),
  datetime.date (2014, 6, 1),
  datetime.date (2014, 7, 1),
  datetime.date (2014, 8, 1),
  datetime.date (2014, 9, 1),
  datetime.date (2014, 10, 1),
  datetime.date (2014, 11, 1),
  datetime.date (2014, 12, 1),
  datetime.date (2015, 1, 1),
  datetime.date (2015, 2, 1)]

Alternatively, some direction on what to Google for this. Cheers!

  • 1
    How the date period is given ? 2 datetime.date objects ? – Roberto Mar 27 '14 at 18:57
  • Whatever is easier, I'm working on a iPython notebook and my code looked ridiculous with that array :) – Gregology Mar 27 '14 at 19:28
6
>>> startyear = 2014
>>> startmonth = 4
>>> endyear = 2015
>>> endmonth = 2
>>> [datetime.date(m/12, m%12+1, 1) for m in xrange(startyear*12+startmonth-1, endyear*12+endmonth)]
[datetime.date(2014, 4, 1), datetime.date(2014, 5, 1), datetime.date(2014, 6, 1), datetime.date(2014, 7, 1), datetime.date(2014, 8, 1), datetime.date(2014, 9, 1), datetime.date(2014, 10, 1), datetime.date(2014, 11, 1), datetime.date(2014, 12, 1), datetime.date(2015, 1, 1), datetime.date(2015, 2, 1)]

For Python 3, you'll need to use range instead of xrange, and // (floor division) instead of / (which does float division in Python 3):

[datetime.date(m//12, m%12+1, 1) for m in range(startyear*12+startmonth-1, endyear*12+endmonth)]
  • 2
    I agree with Andrew on this one (except for the bruteforce) - this is imo. too complex. – Steinar Lima Mar 27 '14 at 19:40
  • I'll be sure to ask codereview.stackexchange next time. – Joe Frambach Mar 27 '14 at 19:44
  • 1
    There's no reason to get grumpy when someone disagrees with your solution to a particular problem. You don't even have to reply if don't feel like it. – Steinar Lima Mar 27 '14 at 19:45
3

With pandas :

   dates= pd.date_range('2018-01-01','2020-01-01' , freq='1M')-pd.offsets.MonthBegin(1)

result :

`DatetimeIndex(['2018-01-01', '2018-02-01', '2018-03-01', '2018-04-01',
               '2018-05-01', '2018-06-01', '2018-07-01', '2018-08-01',
               '2018-09-01', '2018-10-01', '2018-11-01', '2018-12-01',
               '2019-01-01', '2019-02-01', '2019-03-01', '2019-04-01',
               '2019-05-01', '2019-06-01', '2019-07-01', '2019-08-01',
               '2019-09-01', '2019-10-01', '2019-11-01', '2019-12-01'],
              dtype='datetime64[ns]', freq='MS')
  • Nice, but you should specify that it will includes the start of the range (that is '2018-01-01') but not the end (i.e. '2020-01-01') – Igor Fobia Mar 1 at 10:24
2

If you're only creating the list for a few years then efficiency should not be a concern. Clarity of code is the most important aspect.

dates = []
date = datetime.date.today()
while date.year < 2015:
    if date.day == 1:
        dates.append(date)
    date += datetime.timedelta(days=1)
  • Yes, this will handle the case of leap years (when we skip a year). – Joe Frambach Mar 27 '14 at 19:21
2

There is no reason to bruteforce this:

import datetime
from pprint import pprint

dt = datetime.date.today()
end = datetime.date(2015, 2, 1)
dates = []

while dt < end:
    if not dt.month % 12:
        dt = datetime.date(dt.year+1, 1, 1)
    else:
        dt = datetime.date(dt.year, dt.month+1, 1)
    dates.append(dt)

pprint(dates)

Output:

[datetime.date(2014, 4, 1),
 datetime.date(2014, 5, 1),
 datetime.date(2014, 6, 1),
 datetime.date(2014, 7, 1),
 datetime.date(2014, 8, 1),
 datetime.date(2014, 9, 1),
 datetime.date(2014, 10, 1),
 datetime.date(2014, 11, 1),
 datetime.date(2014, 12, 1),
 datetime.date(2015, 1, 1),
 datetime.date(2015, 2, 1)]
1

You can use relativedelta from dateutil, and then create a function to use any date range:

from datetime import date
from dateutil.relativedelta import relativedelta

def mthStList(start_date, end_date):
    stdt_list = []
    cur_date = start_date.replace(day=1) # sets date range to start of month
    while cur_date <= end_date:
        stdt_list.append(cur_date)
        cur_date += relativedelta(months=+1)
    return stdt_list

mthStList(date(2012, 5, 26), date.today())

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.