3

Why is the following syntax valid?

BackgroundWorker bw = new BackgroundWorker();
String one = resultFromSomeMethod();
String two = resultFromOtherMethod();
String three = resultFromThirdMethod();
bw.DoWork += (a,b) => TestMethod(one, two, three);

where TestMethod is defined as:

private void TestMethod(String one, String two, String three){
   //Do Stuff!!
}

The DoWorkEventHandler is defined as a delegate that takes two parameters: object sender and EventArgs e. However, the TestMethod above takes no such parameters. By my understanding of a delegate, to create a new delegate the method has to conform to the delegate's declaration. I seem to have bypassed that restriction by using a lambda. How and why does the syntax above work, even though if I try to create a new DoWorkEventHandler(TestMethod) it most certainly would not work?

I read Eric White's blog on Lambda Expressions but it didn't seem to answer this question.

10

Let me clarify lambda's for you:

(a,b) => TestMethod("", "", "");

Translates to:

private void AnonymousLambda(object a, EventArgs b)
{
    TestMethod("", "", "");
}

The syntax of a lambda is:

implicit method arguments => method body

The implicit method arguments are determined by the expected signature of what the method is being assigned to (or called from). Because you're assigning this lambda expression to the DoWorkEventHandler delegate, it automatically interprets a and b as object and EventArgs respectively.

In some cases, the compiler cannot infer the implicit types for the parameters of the lambda, so you could also have written them explicitly:

(object a, EventArgs b) => TestMethod("", "", "");

So you're really calling your TestMethod in the body of another method which you anonymously created! And the outer method has the DoWorkEventHandler method signature.

EDIT

Per the additional question details about the string variables, the compiler is creating a closure over your code to include the variables in the scope of the method. The code basically becomes a new class which holds the variables as private fields and then references them in the call:

public class AnonymousClosureClass
{
    public void AnonymousLambda(object a, EventArgs b)
    {
        // Note the reference to the original class instance
        String one = originalClassReference.one;
        String two = originalClassReference.two;
        String three = originalClassReference.three;
        TestMethod(one, two, three);
    }
}

And your main code effectively becomes:

BackgroundWorker bw = new BackgroundWorker();

// Note: these may become field members to remain visible to the closure class
String one = resultFromSomeMethod();
String two = resultFromOtherMethod();
String three = resultFromThirdMethod();

var closure = new AnonymousClosureClass();
bw.DoWork += closure.AnonymousLambda;

Finally, worth noting, this is not how the actual generated closure code is named or looks, at all.

  • 3
    You wrapped the TestMethod parameters in the function that matches the signature of the delegate, so it works. This is also known as an Adapter Pattern, though a loose example of one. – Haney Mar 27 '14 at 19:22
  • 1
    @KyleM "the TestMethod parameters would not be in scope." That's called a closure. The anonymous method is a member of an anonymous class. That class will contain fields that reference whatever variables will be needed to call the TestMethod. It's said that the lambda "closes over your local variables". – dcastro Mar 27 '14 at 19:24
  • 1
    The arguments are all string literals. They don't really have a scope. If you're actually passing different values, not just string literals, then in that case they do have scope, they will be closed over, and that comment is relevant. – Servy Mar 27 '14 at 19:26
  • 1
    @DavidHaney I think you're referring to the foreach issue. For the following code, the code generated by the compiler would reuse the variable x for all 10 iterations: foreach(var x in tenItems){ ... }. So, if lambdas were created inside the loop, and they referred to x, all 10 lambdas would close over x and be pointing to the same variable x. I'm pretty sure that issue has been fixed with the release of either C# 4.0 or 5.0. foreach now creates a brand new variable for each iteration. – dcastro Mar 27 '14 at 19:42
  • 2
    @DavidHaney You don't want to avoid closures. Closures are an amazing tool that provide a lot of power, and can greatly simplify code. You simply need to realize that closures close over variables, not values, and code accordingly. Avoiding such an amazing feature simply because of that is extremely wasteful. – Servy Mar 27 '14 at 19:43
5

The TestMethod is being called from the (a,b) function.

Look at it this way instead:

BackgroundWorker bw = new BackgroundWorker();
bw.DoWork += DoWorkFunc;

void DoWorkFunc(object a, EventArgs b)
{
    TestMethod("", "", "");
}
5

The parameters are defined in the (a,b) portion of your code. These correspond to object sender and DoWorkEventArgs e. That is, your lambda is similar to the following code:

BackgroundWorker bw = new BackgroundWorker();
bw.DoWork += new DoWorkEventHandler(MyFunction);


void MyFunction(object a, DoWorkEventArgs b)
{
    TestMethod("", "", "");
}

The fact that you're not using the parameters, or returning the value of TestMethod, is irrelevant.

(compare to a Func<int, int>myFunc = c => c + 1 lambda equivalent)

int MyFunction(int c)
{
    return c + 1;
}
5

The delegate's arguments are simply unused. Lambda is an equivalent of the following method:

void LambdaMethod(object a, DoWorkEventArgs b)
{
    TestMethod("", "", "");
}

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